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Almost reaching a new level, but not quite ...


EddiePlaysBass

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This past few days, with the recent audition and the fact that I'll have to learn a sh*tload of new music in a relatively short timespan, I realised that I've reached the final stage of one level in my playing, but that I can't get past that stage to move on to the next one :(

 

I know I should focuss more on theory. I mean, I know what changes a minor chord imply, I sort of know the I-II-III-IV-V and VII thingie (funnily enough not the VI, nor beyond the VII) but I don't know enough about scales, know far too less about arpeggio's etc etc.

 

I mean I do practice scales from time to time, with a metronome (you need to warm up with something I guess) but when it comes down to actually applying them, I draw a blank.

 

I guess I'm in a phase where I just KNOW that there is more cool stuff to be done on my fretboard, but I can't do it ... And THAT is just too annoying :mad:

"I'm a work in progress." Micky Barnes

 

The Ross Brown Shirt World Tour

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Eddie, I don't know how well you can read music, but the F.Simandl Method for Double Bass is an excellent source. It covers just about every aspect of technique on a URB, but its every bit as applicable to bass guitar... (it worked for Jaco)....

As far as learning the songs for the band, I would get recordings of all the songs, and learn to play along with them, til you have the bass lines nailed. While this method doesn't teach you the theory behind what you're playing, as you work your way thru the tunes, you learn new techniques....

It may sound unorthodox, but I personally feel that if you are learning to play songs you couldn't play before, you're progressing, and the patterns you learn can be applied to other songs as well.

 

If you read tab, you could always consider finding an instructor who can transcribe the bass lines into tab. He can also teach you the whys and such of the bass lines, and help you get to that next level you're reaching for.

 

Above all man, DON'T get discouraged, and lose the word "can't" from your vocabulary.... you CAN do this. All it takes is the desire and determination to succeed.

 

You'll do fine... :thu:

 

Rock on.....

 

Tommy

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I would get recordings of all the songs, and learn to play along with them, til you have the bass lines nailed. While this method doesn't teach you the theory behind what you're playing, as you work your way thru the tunes, you learn new techniques....
Amen to thst brother!! I didn't even learn to sight read till I was in my 20's. I still play with a new song to learn it.

"He is to music what Stevie Wonder is to photography." getz76

 

I have nothing nice to say so . . .

 

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If you read tab, you could always consider finding an instructor who can transcribe the bass lines into tab. He can also teach you the whys and such of the bass lines
You were doing all right til you said "TAB". If someone REALLY wants to get to the next plateau they shouldn't use climbing rope that's ROTTEN. And the truth is, there's a lot more that can be learned about the construction of music / a part if regular notation is the medium for study.
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No disagreement here GB.... I don't read TAB.... its never made any sense to me... maybe because I've been reading notes since I was a kid... but if one is unable to read notes, tab can be helpful... but it's definately not a substitute for knowing standard notation.

 

Tommy

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Yeah, just learn the tunes, write out the verse progression of something for hints later on and practice away! And don't worry too much about little fills or little extra unneeded notes. Just get the gist and run along.

 

Don't worry! Playing out is one of the most experience laden events in a bass playing career. I've learned a ton from that and I still have plenty of studying to do!

 

Good luck man!

In Skynyrd We Trust
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Thanks everyone :thu: I was a bit down when I posted that ... Actually I am progressing in several areas (like finally getting some rudimentary form of slapping down - you should hear me slap "Sweet Home Alabama" :D ) but I guess I want to run before I can walk.

 

About TAB, it's all I've ever used. Either tab or a lyrics sheet with guitar chords. I do intend to learn to read, but it'll be at the very earliest a year from now. Right now school is the top priority for me ... As weird as that would sound to anyone who knows me in person ;)

 

Playing along with songs => have been doing that from day one also. Never figured out why people (especially guitarists) will only learn a riff or two, or an intro ... Gimme the song !!!

 

Thanks for the encouragement, time to let this post sink now (because I feel better :D )

"I'm a work in progress." Micky Barnes

 

The Ross Brown Shirt World Tour

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Hey Eddie, I'm 28- I tried to learn to read music and ya know I should have never stopped. I have a ton of books on reading music with exercises and all of this and that but the truth is, I HEAR the note before I see it, you know what I mean? I play by ear. I can hear something once and remember it in my head, days, months later, and play it. But still, there are certain times when my ear isn't as sharp, like the other night - I was playing in a new cover band for the first time, 5 guys in a small room all blastin away and I was suppsoed to keep up while playing songs I never, ever, played before. But I heard the songs before on the radio so I knew the grooves. But with all the noise going on it was hard for me to distinguish note from note so the guitar player handed me a chord chart with notation for each song.

You would think in a cover band he would have handed me TAB. But this guy was a real stickler.

So, needless to say, I was thrown off, confused, reduced to playing roots, 5ths, and octaves until I finally knew what to do by the end of the song. And by then the band leader was ripping into China Grove. This was my first audition with these guys too, and they were all older, more experienced blokes, ya know? I thought I sucked the whole way through but they were real happy to have me.

Which brings me to the next thing - KEEPING TIME. Since the drummer and I were locked rock solid all rehearsal/audition long, I guess they figured they could keep me.

Cheers

"The world will still be turning when you've gone." - Black Sabbath

 

Band site: www.finespunmusic.com

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I'd recommend finding a teacher, someone good to get you a program to learn what you need to get to the "next level."

 

If you're learning songs, you're progressing..sort of. I mean, you're learning something, & it's something you can take to other contexts. BUT if you are learning the songs by rote, it will be MUCH harder and take MUCH longer than if you could understand how the lines are part of the musical structure of the song they're in. You can learn series of notes, but it's harder, & you learn less. You really need to understand the line musically. It's the difference between saying, "The line is G B D E D C" (or "this fret then that one") and saying, "It's a G major triad, then the 6th, back to the 4th from a whole step above." Obviously, once you've learned a line you'll just play it without thinking at all.

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I'm still learning a bunch of new tunes for church. Get a Tascam CD-BT1 Bass Trainer...this little gadget plays CD's, can change the tempo without changing the key, change the key without changing the tempo, or change both the tempo and key. It lets you set loops so you can cycle through difficult parts until you have it. There's other similar devices, but this one gets my vote for about $150 or less.

 

If you can just get chord charts for the songs, that cuts the time in half (or it does for me). I haven't stumbled across any site that has simple chord charts, but I'm sure if you do a search on Google, you'll probably find a bunch.

 

Dave

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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