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Tab for walking bass lines?


Gruuve

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Hey folks:

 

I used to have a book filled with walking bass lines (every flavor you can imagine), but I can't find the blasted thing now. There's obviously tons of tablature sites on the web...has anyone run across a collection of walking bass line tabs?

 

TIA,

Dave

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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Isn't that like braille guide to masturbation?

 

Get a method (like Ed's ferinstance), or just learn theory and chords and start making your own. And STUDY the masters. By recordings, and by your own transcriptions in REAL NOTATION.

 

Just my opinion.

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Subass, I should rebuff you. You are definitely in that inferior category. I gave my opinion on what Dave asked, without however considering him in that category.

 

The issue, not the PERSON, you fricking douche bag : }

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I'll give the same answer that my esteemed colleague gave but in different words.

 

If you are planning on playing walking bass, you are entering a world in which tab is not only not used, but its use is scorned.

 

Lines are either written out in notes or the chord symbols are supplied are in every big band in the world. In small jazz groups nearly all the time all you are given is chord symbols.

 

If you learn the theory behind walking bass lines you can make up your own. It's not very hard. If you learn how to read notes you can read written examples and you might be ready to play in high school jazz ensemble. If you learn how to hear notes that other people play and play something that sounds the same you will begin to become a jazz musician.

 

Ed Friedland's books on walking bass are excellent. Study them.

 

Give a man a fish and he'll eat for one day.

Give a man a fishing rod and he'll poke you in the eye with it.

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Hey Eddie,

 

If one wants to learn how to walk, Ray Brown is a better study than the Beatles - who I love, but they aren't about THAT. Beatles lines are pretty much predetermined and played note for note, and as you get into the harmonically more complex music of theirs, you can pretty much guess that the lines are painstakingly constructed to a blueprint that is altered until it is just so.

 

Walking however is more an act of jazz improv, in that the lines you hear on the recording or at the gig may be built out of a way of thinking but not frozen into a production model. They change. If you look at one take it is often different than another. And as long as you do your job nobody complains ifd you see a new path through the changes. Indeed, you are helping your soloists and section to apporach the song differently too, and maybe that elusive magic may be heightened.

 

Summary: one is [close to] spontaneous, the other is usually more like part of the writing process. They serve different musical goals.

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Dave,

 

One of the differences in the studying/learning process - when you are sitting there staring at a transcription - is that a tab just doesn't show harmonic relationships (let alone rhythmic) readily.

 

Musical notation on the other hand, can reveal much about the composition and the way a player was thinking. If you have no chord changes indicated in the transcription, but have each actual note, you can often determine what the changes are in most if not every passage. Looking at the notes, you can see chords being outlined, often tell when chromatic passing tones are being used, see anticipations, and even think of alternate changes - substitutions. This in turn teaches you more about theory.

 

Tab is just opaque. With tab you don't have easily grouped relationships or any sense of progression. It's a dead end for study.

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Originally posted by jeremyc lugosi:

If you learn the theory behind walking bass lines you can make up your own. It's not very hard.

I'm sure you're right. So why do I suck so bad at it? (There's an obvious answer...but I prefer not to think about it.) I have Ed's book, & it's great, but I've started it many times & then just blanked. Maybe I just need a more concerted effort.
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I'd say more concerted effort (same applies for me BTW) - but also I think one needs an immersive listening environment. Music with walking lines, usually REAL jazz, from the masters. That'll give you a feel for jazz that will internalize. I know sometimes my lines are "correct" enough but sound a little like FAKE jazz. Much pop music that features walking has that veneer feeling.

 

But in jazz you see feel and hear the real wood.

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The other part of the immersive experience is to actually get chances to WALK in gigs and jams. I rarely get the chance; but in extended songs/solo sections at rock-oriented gigs I do sometimes decide to take it into walking territory, and that little bit helps immensely. Sometimes I also take the blues-oriented stuff into more uptown territory when I see that the soloist and drummer or another comper can go with it.

 

Still more rare, being around people who can do newgrass/dawg music or real jazz.

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Well, if you find the hardcore study of music notation less than inspiring, realize that Jaco had to do it too. And Chuck Rainey.

 

Both guys learned how to play before they learned to read. And both guys had to kinda go to square one and learn reading.

 

If you struggle with the book, you need help. A good teacher can get you reading fairly quickly if you are motivated.

 

In fact, a good teacher can get you motivated!

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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Thanks for all the posts you guys. Actually, you've impressed a good point upon me...I can sight read even complex rhythms and odd time signatures in notation all day long (started my musical adventures as a drummer and percussionist!), but I am quite slow at reading pitches in notation. So, point taken...this is probably an opportunity to get better at reading the melodic part of music.

 

Thx,

Dave

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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Hey Dave,

 

Even though I talked about reading, it was more in the context of reading in order to study what masters of walking have going on in their lines. So, yeah if you are reading good transcriptions it will help your sight reading. But the real point is to be able to analyze (and transcribe too - and THEN analyze) what is going on there - what makes the good ones work - so you can do what THEY do. Which is MAKING IT UP AS YOU GO.

 

This is especially true of jazz.

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Originally posted by greenboy:

I'd say more concerted effort (same applies for me BTW) - but also I think one needs an immersive listening environment.

I think you're dead right. (Mark your calendar.) :D

 

I like jazz, I appreciate jazz, I enjoy when I hear it...but I don't love it, I don't make a point of listening to it, and I came to it very late in life. So I think I approach walking as, "I should be able to do this, so I should study." I suppose it's no surprise I still can't really do it. :cry: Not sure how to fix that one.

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