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Upcoming audition - moral dilemma?


EddiePlaysBass

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So I got this audition next week, for a band nearby. Everything tells me that these guys mean really serious business: they have their own website, a huge repertoire of coversongs and quite an impressive repertoire of originals also.

They're also in their 40's, all of them. Me, I'm 23.

 

Now, I assume that if I'd get the gig, this would mean rehearsing several times a week and probably gigging every weekend. Which sounds like a lot of fun :D:thu::D

 

BUTI'm still a student ... This is my final year, my thesis year. I hardly have any time to work on my thesis as it is, and would definitely not have the time to do a gig like that one.

 

So here's my dilemma: I'm confident that I'll at least have a good shot at getting the gig; but if I do and it's like I said above, I'll have to turn it down :(

 

Should I go to the audition regardless? I think JeremyC once said that "auditions count as experience, sitting in your room playing to cd's doesn't" (correct me if I'm wrong) ...

 

Thoughts?

"I'm a work in progress." Micky Barnes

 

The Ross Brown Shirt World Tour

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If they have not already told you what the schedule will be like, then go ahead & audition. If it comes to it, they'll make an offer & explain what they'll expect from you. If you really can do it, then fine. If not, then don't. No harm done. (Keep in mind that your college course requirements are fixed--they won't adjust themselves to accommodate your outside schedule.)

 

If they have already told you what the schedule will be like, you really should decide whether you can do it before you audition, & don't do the audition if you can't take the gig, says I. Interviewing also counts as experience, but I do not interview for jobs I know I couldn't get or wouldn't want or couldn't take. It is wrong to waste a person's time.

 

It sounds from your post that you're in the first situation--you're assuming but they've not told you their schedule--in which case, yeah, why not audition? If they've chosen to audition people before disclosing expectations, then they may have decided to waste some of their own time; but that's their lookout, not yours. So why not go?

 

Or do I misunderstand your situation?

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Time is at a premium for lots of people. Many would feel they were getting jerked off if you were taking "vanity" audition time without intention to follow through anyway. Their time could be better spent auditioning others, working on their website, or even changing their strings... Worse yet would be if they CHOSE YOU and you then were not prepared to follow through.

 

On the other, er, hand: maybe they are not entirely adverse to auditioning people who might LATER prove to be good contacts. So perhaps you should talk to them first and honestly tell them the situ.

.
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Eddie,

 

I've spent some time auditioning some people here and there. Some of them I already knew were good players. Though they'd have to play to show that they can do the gig and make sure writing and playing was compatible. If I knew them from a band, the scene, or if they were already a friend; I'd make sure we are on the same page, schedule, attitude, and goal wise. It's a situation of, "I don't want to waste your time, I don't want you to waste mine". Sometimes, we will even love the same bands but want to put a different ration of certain styles into the music. Example: Maybe we both like to listen and play Entombed, Dream Theater, Arch Enemy, and Rush. But one wants more of a progressive edge, and the other may be shooting for a more death metal edge. Sometimes it does get that silly, and you don't find out later. There's always a lot to talk about. Sometimes, people want to play, do shows, but will never in the long run consider going on tour because of family, job or whatever. Also financial obligations. I've always been in a band where we have had a lock out studio, web site, promotion, shirts, recordings. Not all at once, but at least $150/mo per member. Sorry to throw in some extras here, but it's all relevant to me, even beyond scheduling.

 

Surely your school stuff should take priority for now. Seems like you don't have too far to go. Then you can do whatever. I have a friend in Illinois who went to med school. His band mates were always waiting on him to do things until he graduated. I didn't think graduating would make him more committed, thought he'd be trying to build a career. Not the story, he went into full blow band mode after graduation. You should talk to the band before you show up to play and be 100% strait. You are very interested, but you have a few limitations for now. What can be done if anything? And go from there. Obviously they won't be considered asses for wanting someone more full speed ahead for now. But it can't hurt for asking.

Mike Bear

 

Artisan-Vocals/Bass

Instructor

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Think about what you could do. Think about flexibility and availablility. Then see what they are looking for.

 

Let's say you decide you can swing 4 rehearsals and 2 gigs a month. If they say "we usually rehearse on Wednesday but you meet your advisor on Wednesdays, see how flexible they can be. Have the conversation up front, but don't let it be a two sentence thing (unless they immediately want much more than you can do).

 

If you can't fit their sched, you can ask to audition anyway (or just jam a bit). If they say yes, you may earn a spot as their favorite sub.

 

I'm in a band that had a website and 50 cover tunes down, and we're old. But we only rehearse once a month and gig a few times a year. You never know until you ask.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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Eddie, I hate to be the naysayer, but...

 

1. did you see them play a paid gig yet? I have an audition coming up in 2.5 weeks for a band I got to see last Friday. Because they had most of the audience singing along (60s/70s covers) and it was SRO from the first note, I'm psyched to get ready for this audition. If you didn't see them play yet, the rest (internet, bookings, etc.) could all be just media hype.

 

2. you'll get many chances at auditions, bands come and go all the time, but you may only get ONE CHANCE at this thesis. If you want to finish the thesis program, there really isn't an alternative. Get it done and get that behind you so you can move on to what you want.

 

Dr. Sweet Willie should be making a house call any time soon... what's up, doc?

:D

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don't feel bad. i just turned down a gig because of my classload. the guys had the same influence, good gear, same teacher as myself, and seemed pretty serious. now i'm back to jamming with a guitar player who just started pharmacy school (plus has 2 kids) who doesn't have any time
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Our buddy Bicycle # 6 had a great thought. Be honest.

 

Let them know, and then if they still want to hear you, great.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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Honesty is usually the way to go. There is, however, something to be said for the lever. These guys might be a contact that leads you to something important. Especially if you share a lot of interests. By lever I mean leverage. If you do squeeze into the gig you might have enough leverage to rehearse on your terms. Just make sure you learn all the tunes. Do your bass homework. Then the practices will be easy.

 

You're not being dishonest in this case because you don't have enough information to make a decision. You don't know if you'll be able to make time for them. I say, go and audition and negotiate after they want you in the band.

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Eddie, I'd be up-front with them about your obligations.... your education needs to come first. Writing a thesis isn't easy under the best of conditions. The more distractions you have, the harder it gets. I still wish I'd finished my master's and that was over 30 years ago.... :(

You're young and have the rest of your life for bands and music. You only have now for the thesis.

If they are able to work their schedule around yours, great. If not, then it wasn't meant to be.

 

Tommy

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Originally posted by Raven:

If they are able to work their schedule around yours, great. If not, then it wasn't meant to be.

I mailed them and explained the situation. Apparently the rehearse once a week or sometimes every other week. No gigs planned for the rest of the years.

 

They told me to come and audition, and we'd talk about it all then.

 

Thumbs up :D

"I'm a work in progress." Micky Barnes

 

The Ross Brown Shirt World Tour

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