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serving the funk to the unwashed.


The Fonz

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so here's my issue:

 

the band is coming along fine. everyone in it is competent on his instrument, and we're tightening up nicely. i'm the first actual bass player they've ever played with and it's a real ego-inflater to have them gush over how much better the band grooves with me in it.

 

but there is a few problems that i need your help with. #1: as they've never worked with a proper bass player the drummer got used to filling in the bottom end with a lot of double bass work. the result is overly complicated and busy drum parts that make it difficult to play anything interesting that lends to the groove. i wind up just concentrating on the bass drum and playing along with that. ordinarily this wouldn't be so bad if the drummer had an idea of how the bass works, but as he's never worked with one he doesn't.

 

#2: the rest of the band and i have divergent ideas at times as to how to approach material. they don't have the broad base of influences that i do. they're very good at working of their influences and they're very open to other stuff but they have no idea how to approach it. i get to rehearsal today and the guitar player and i were the only ones there. he knows i'm trying to broaden the scope of rehearsals in order to expand our level of musicianship so he suggested we have a little open jam. i played a little funk lick in Cmaj and he had no idea of how to play with it.

 

so my idea is to make a cd of blues/r&b/funk to get them listening to something other than sabbath, van halen and alice in chains (check out their bios here to get a better picture of what i'm working with). can anyone make some suggestions for what to put on it to kind of get their feet wet and get them into? if i just start pumping them full of parliament and herbie hancock it'll turn them off. i was thinking of starting off with bad brains and gradually raising the funk/reggae/r&b levels from there and finally giving them a second cd with the groove, the whole groove and nothing but the groove.

 

thanks.

Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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I would say that you should give them several different styles. (I am stating the obvious) Have them play along with them. I didn't know how much fun some styles were until I played them. I always thought I would hate walking around in jazz, but once I got into it it was a ton of fun. For the funk, you can't go wrong with James Brown or Tower of Power. Tower of Power has some catchy stuff that is not too far out there. Good luck and let us know how you progress. :thu:

Let your speech be better than silence, or be silent.

 

For those who believe, no explanation is necessary. For those who do not, none will suffice.

 

"Rindase!"

"Rendirme? Que se rinda su abuela, *#@!^$"

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Ah, I was actually going to suggest Sabbath as a heavy band that really grooves... Some funkier steps up would be Led Zep, RATM, RHCP, followed by Funkadelic. (Korn have got a big funk groove going on but it's quite complex on the bottom). Also, try some hiphop - Cypress Hill's pretty dark. Rolling Stones have a unique groove as well. And The Stooges. Then hit them with Parliament, The Meters and James Brown.

 

The challenge you face is that if they don't want to hear the improvement brought about by removing complexity and adding funk, then they won't. Good luck! :D

 

Alex

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Living Colour and Fishbone come to mind, as do RATM, Zep and Kings X, for various reasons and tunes.

I'll put a list together, we'll talk. :)

 

Peace,

 

wraub

 

I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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Matt started using a double kick pedal nine years ago, and not only has it become a trademark of his playing style, but it has also become an integral part of Blue Winter's signature sound: "When you have only one guitar player in the band, it's really important to do everything you can to reinforce the low end. Playing a lot of double kick patterns helps keep the bottom from falling out."
Hmmm...I don't think you'll get much of a reception to funk from this guy.
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I doubt this will be possible but could you record the band rehearsing a song, then take away the second kick pedal and do it again, and then let them listen back to how the extra space really helps the groove?

 

I'm totally up for double kick pedals/drums (I do like the concept of different sized kicks - say a 20" and a 24", for different tonal choices) but like all extended instruments be it through strings/effects/technique etc it requires taste for it to enhance rather than clutter the music.

 

Alex

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Originally posted by BenLoy:

Matt started using a double kick pedal nine years ago, and not only has it become a trademark of his playing style, but it has also become an integral part of Blue Winter's signature sound: "When you have only one guitar player in the band, it's really important to do everything you can to reinforce the low end. Playing a lot of double kick patterns helps keep the bottom from falling out."
Hmmm...I don't think you'll get much of a reception to funk from this guy.
yeah, that quote still makes me cringe, but note the pics of the bass player... they haven't updated the site since they booted him. all that double kick stuff was actually matt trying to add low end to a band that essentially had NO bass in it. i'm going to ask him to change that quote because it makes me sound like a hack.
Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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