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Started Playing in Church Today...Anyone Else?


SteveC

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Well at age 38 I am finally growing up I guess. No more sleeping in, home owner, soon to be married, and going to church again.

 

I wanted to have a more active roll in church, and one of the guys where I teach lessons has been on me for a while to come and play with them in their "contemporary" worship band. Well, today I started. It was a great time. Easy music, but fun. Nice people. It feels good to be able to contribute something and make a start at being active again. I may do some upright playing with a violinist friend of mine in the "regular" service, too.

 

Isn't it interesting the effect getting married and children in the future has on a guy.

 

Anyone else play in church?

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Nice to see you finally settling down, after all those late night orchestra parties.

 

Are your brains going "ga-ga" over one too many Del Borgo charts yet! (welcome to the new school year!)

 

I'm still playing in church, still getting paid for it. If anyone cares to revisit, we have an extensive discussion on getting paid to play in church a while ago.

 

Keep up the faith.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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This week not only did I play music at Jewish high holiday services and Friday night services at a different synagogue where I regularly play but I also played at the church which owns the private school where I teach.

 

I find this aspect of musical performance to be not always particularly musical but it always feels rewarding to be able to use my musical skills to assist in worship.

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Congrats on the new church band deal! I know you're gonna have fun with it.

 

Yeah, I've recently start playing in the youth worship band "The Hi Lights". We get to play a service once a month.

 

We get to play at other churches/church events twice a year, and this year we're starting this tour deal as a servant event where you travel to like 10 different churches (one if gonna be the youth leader's brother's church in like Texas or whatnot, supposedly) across the nation.

 

Sadly, they already have a bassist, so I'm just learning the songs changes right now and goofin' around high on the neck.

 

Happily, the current bassist is a senior in high school. Next year, it's MOVE OVER!

In Skynyrd We Trust
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I'm about to start playing at the church my wife and I have been going to for the past several months. I've got a CD with 16 songs on it, and I've mastered 7 of them in about 3 weeks, got the rest to go. I'll probably start playing next weekend or two.

 

I haven't been historically what I'd consider a "religious" person, but I'm finding that this church's messages are relevant to my life, and may help me live it better. Music occupies about 1/3 of each 1 hr service, and I really enjoy listening to that part, and I know I'll enjoy playing that part as well.

 

Interesting thing, most of what I have played on bass in the past has been metal and metal funk. Learning these contemporary Christian songs is forcing me to learn a slightly different style that's not quite as "in your face". All said and done, I think this is going to be a great experience and a way for me to give back something that I've been given as a gift.

 

Dave

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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I'm playing church all of my life. I laernt bass also accidentaly in church. When we was started the band from only flattop acoutic guitar, nobody wants the big bass (I was 13 years old - now 31), so I took the responsibility.

Until now, I have enjoyed serving for the Lord. Especially when the atmosphere is really full with His Existence - that what I seek all the time.

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Have been playing in church since about '98. Had played electric guitar for many years but switched to bass when our bass player moved away. Found out that was the instrument I really loved to play - kind of a surprise. Still playing bass. Our music pastor really likes Tommy Walker tunes - I heartily recommend his CD, Make it Glorious.

 

Praising Him,

 

Tom

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I played 4 services a week for almost 3 years straight. I moved and haven't gotten back into it yet. I really do enjoy it. It is just a non-threatening environment where I know I am with good people and I don't have to worry about band division and the like. Granted, in most churches the music is not very challenging, but I just have to remind myself that I am not doing it for myself. Enjoy it. It is like no other place. :thu:

Let your speech be better than silence, or be silent.

 

For those who believe, no explanation is necessary. For those who do not, none will suffice.

 

"Rindase!"

"Rendirme? Que se rinda su abuela, *#@!^$"

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I play in church, too. I love it. The funny thing is, when I listen to music in church, I usually end up more focused on the music itself than on worship. Fortunately, when I'm playing, I can channel that into focusing on creating a good environment with the music. That makes the music part of the service more meaningful for me.

 

One of the best parts about it, though has been the relationships I've made with other players. These people have become some of my best friends & most valued spiritual peers. Some of them have taught me a TON--more than they'll ever know--about being a musician, & especially part of a rhythm section. And it has become a terrific outlet for musical expression in things we get together on outside of church.

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In high school, I played with a choral group on Saturday night Masses. Technically, the music wasn't difficult since the music just had the chords. From the chords, I would use my recently gained music theory to liven up the bass line.

The other members included: 6 string guitarist, 12-string guitarist, flutist, pianist, and some singers with tambourines. I had the only electric instrument and wore it across my back when going for communion. Lent a little edge to the group and had many people from the congregation asking me to "turn it up." I was always a bit afraid about using my powered advantage and overpowering the group.

Had a lot of fun, and am now looking for a local church to play in as well.

 

ATM

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I have been playing sax at church for 5 years... it didn't seem that long, but I found a rehearsal tape the other day labeled "Sep '99."

 

I enjoy it, and it lets me get my music fix in a setting that my wife and kids can participate in.

 

(Getz, there is a QT 2 blocks from the church, but there isn't a gentlemen's club for at least a couple miles.)

- Matt W.
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dbb, I read some of the e-mails on your link as well as through this one, and I'm surprised no one came up with a 3rd option, the one I'm doing: getting vouchers instead of money.

 

A few months back I started working with a local gospel church choir on a series of recordings. I stated out front that I just needed someone to sign off on the time I spent in the recording sessions as well as my commuting time. What I'm collecting is a series of vouchers which will eventually be signed off by the minister as validation that I spent *** hours on specific dates and times to record original material for the church. This I intend to present next year to the state and IRS as unreimbursed business income.

 

True, the credit I'll get in monetary amount is much less (probably 20-25%) than what I would've gotten if I charged them outright, but it is more than either the church can afford to pay me or what I would've gotten if I'd done this absolutely free and didn't record any of my trips, expenses or time spent. It is the middle ground where the church pays nothing and I get a little more back in my tax return next year.

 

It's too early to determine if this'll work, but my accountant liked the idea and gave me the go-ahead to do this.

:wave:

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Usually about once a month, the Jazz crew does something for a service, and I get the call to work bass...or guitar, depending on the song.

 

I don't get paid for it, but I'm having a blast...it's fun for me to try and find a balance between tearing up the bass, and staying out of the way so worship can take place.

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Originally posted by Fred the bass player:

dbb, I read some of the e-mails on your link as well as through this one, and I'm surprised no one came up with a 3rd option, the one I'm doing: getting vouchers instead of money.

 

A few months back I started working with a local gospel church choir on a series of recordings. I stated out front that I just needed someone to sign off on the time I spent in the recording sessions as well as my commuting time. What I'm collecting is a series of vouchers which will eventually be signed off by the minister as validation that I spent *** hours on specific dates and times to record original material for the church. This I intend to present next year to the state and IRS as unreimbursed business income.

 

True, the credit I'll get in monetary amount is much less (probably 20-25%) than what I would've gotten if I charged them outright, but it is more than either the church can afford to pay me or what I would've gotten if I'd done this absolutely free and didn't record any of my trips, expenses or time spent. It is the middle ground where the church pays nothing and I get a little more back in my tax return next year.

 

It's too early to determine if this'll work, but my accountant liked the idea and gave me the go-ahead to do this.

:wave:

Great tip, Fred.

Steve Force,

Durham, North Carolina

--------

My Professional Websites

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We don't get paid either. That's fine, there are other benefits.

 

The set up is pretty sweet. When they remodeled the church a while back, they did it with the contemporary service in mind. The fellowship hall is where we play. There is a large stage that moves in and out from the wall! You can leave everything on it and just (with some grunting) roll it back and shut the sliding doors. Roll the wheeled speaker stacks away and you're ready for some other use.

 

The guitar player works at the store where I teach, so the system is pretty nice. Nice mixer, bi-amped FOH, EQ, Reverb, Compression, etc. Nice clean sound. The only weakness is 2 monitor mixes. I hope we can add one more power amp soon so we can have 4. We don't use stage amps, everything is run DI. Guitar and bass through Line 6 Pods, keys and acoustic guitar DI.

 

After using a Pod again, I am thinking about going to a Podxt again and dumping all my other outboard gear.

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I've been playing in our church now for about a year and a half. It's really what got me back into the bass after a twenty year layoff. They needed someone and started talking about hiring a bass player. I mentioned that I used to play in high school and after a couple of private lessons from the worship pastor I went live. Very intimidating for the first month or so.

 

We play a lot of Third Day, Hillsong, United Live, Mat Redman, and just started in with Switchfoot this past week. What are you guys playing?

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I've been playing for our Youth band for about two years. We've been playing some tracks from Vineyards "Dwell" lately.

"Have ya paid your dues, Jack?""Yessir, the check is in the mail." - Jack Burton

"Life is hard. It's even harder if you're stupid." - John Wayne

"He danced like he was the bastard offspring of a chicken and a broken electrical cable." - CMDN

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I have been playing for our church for awhile. We play Contempary Christian Music. What is good about it is that I get handed chord charts so I can make up my own bass lines.It feels good to play what I consider positive music.To me there is nothing better then the blending of music and the love for my Savior. :thu:
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My mother let me start singing in church choir (she's been the on-and-off director for 20+ years) once my voice broke and I could actually sing tenor instead of soprano. :)

 

Since then I've always been in church choir or performing special musical presentations. On a few different occasions I've also filled the choir director shoes, congregational hymn accompanist (piano) shoes, and nowadays I get to be the choir accompanist (piano), which keeps me practicing because the music can get fairly demanding at times.

 

It would be a little weird for me to NOT be involved in the music at church. :)

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I started playing bass during the 2nd term of my freshmen year in college at a church in cambridge.

 

I've played almost exclusively in church for all of my days on bass. (1yr 8months)

 

I often find that if a song has tough changes (or changes that require more of my attention) i have a hard time focusing on what is being said/sang (mostly faster songs), but for the slower songs that aim to create an atmosphere of worship it's easier to focus on what's being said/sang.

 

I wouldn't ask for money to play bass in church, but i wouldn't turn it down either.

 

jason

 

edited for spelling

2cor5:21

Soli Deo Gloria

 

"it's the beauty of a community. it takes a village to raise a[n] [LLroomtempJ]." -robb

 

My YouTube Channel

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I play and lead the band (for about 2 years). I've only been playing bass for 3 years so its been a steep learning curve. Anyways -- I'm not sure I agree with the 'simple music' tag. Hymns can be quite hard, especially trying to get the piano player and the congregation in time.
A man is not usually called upon to have an opinion of his own talents at all; he can very well go on improving them to the best of his ability without deciding on his own precise niche in the temple of Fame. -- C.S.Lewis
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I've been playing in church for five years. (Started 6 months after my son was born. ;) )

 

I do second keys (b3/synth) in a pretty full band: five horns, 2 guitars, 2 keys, percussion, bass and drums. Free gig, but I wouldn't trade it for a different one. It's not the music, it's the atmosphere.

 

Jerry

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I've done a number of services now and am liking it a lot. The others in the band are good players. I've done jazz gigs with the drummer before so I'm familiar with him.

 

It's a fun atmosphere. Rehearsals are good, too. After we get the stuff down for th efollowign Sunday we tend to wander off into a variety of things. Last week was "Sweet Emotion." Go figure.

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I played bass in our contemporary worship band for a couple of years. I must agree that it is very rewarding and best of all, it forced me to be more disciplined about attending church every Sunday - I never miss a gig! :)

 

I also perform 2-3 nights each week with my "other" band (the one that pays the bills). Eventually, raising four kids, working a full time day job and playing in two bands caught up with me, so I had to give up the church gig. I do miss it at times...

 

Kirk

Reality is like the sun - you can block it out for a time but it ain't goin' away...
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Originally posted by ClarkW:

My mother let me start singing in church choir (she's been the on-and-off director for 20+ years)

.....

I've also filled the choir director shoes..

Does your mom have big feet, or do you have little feet? What about the high heels?

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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Originally posted by Tom Capasso:

Originally posted by ClarkW:

My mother let me start singing in church choir (she's been the on-and-off director for 20+ years)

.....

I've also filled the choir director shoes..

Does your mom have big feet, or do you have little feet? What about the high heels?

 

Tom

Different congregations, fortunately, because my size 11 feet probably won't fit in her size 5 shoes. :)

 

Never tried high heels, but I might splurge for a pair of these babies this year to complete my Halloween outfit. :)

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