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Session work...anyone here do it? Anyone who used to do it? Looking for some insight


Rick Hoffman

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Not so I can get famous, but I see session work as a great way to get some satisfaction from playing - and not for the credit ( if you get any) but to better yourself by putting yourself in different situations, meeting other musicians, jamming with other bands. I could jam with a different band every week...

Yeah I guess I'm a musical whore, eh?

It just seems like a cool deal, but nothing comes easy in this business. Do any of you guys have experience related to this?

"The world will still be turning when you've gone." - Black Sabbath

 

Band site: www.finespunmusic.com

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I do session work often enough that I can comment on it.

 

It's not easy...and it's demanding.

 

You need to be versatile, tasteful, and be able to walk into a session cold and learn a song within a matter of minutes.

 

Then you need to be able to cut it on the first take.

 

You need to have your sound together...and have multiple sounds available to the engineer...on one bass.

 

I started doing session work after playing live for many years in different bands. I played in funk bands, reggae bands, swing bands, rock bands, country bands, etc. I kept my ears open.

 

You also need a great attitude. You need to act like you're digging the music even when you think it's the worst thing you've ever heard. You also need to deal with prima donna artists who will tell you to play something and then get mad at you for playing it (really), then somehow give them what they want without knowing what it is (make it purple in the bridge!).

 

At the end of the day, the guys who really make a living at session work are the guys who can walk in, sit down, listen to the tune once and then play a great part.

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what Ben said. And may I add that it's been a bitch for me to ever get into a position where I have done enough sessions to call it substantial. While I've managed to somehow get by playing live, sessions elude me. Just a handful a year.

Praise ye the LORD.

....praise him with stringed instruments and organs...

Let every thing that hath breath praise the LORD.

excerpt from- Psalm 150

visit me at:

www.adriangarcia.net

for His glory

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I've done session work, not a lot, but over the years the credits add up, I guess.

 

You don't find it. It finds you.

 

I wouldn't exactly describe it as fun. It's challenging, exciting, terrifying, boring, tedious, and a whole bunch of other things.

 

A year later you hear the finished project and can't believe what the result was.

 

But I'm never going to turn any studio work down. :D

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So I guess you do it just to do it.

The subject at hand came about when a rap/hip hop guy heard some tracks of me in my current jam band and he asked me to come down and lay down tracks for a few local rap guys.

I like to bring the funk to hip hop once in a while so I guess I'll just give the guy a call and smoke a fatty and wear my hat sideways. :P

"The world will still be turning when you've gone." - Black Sabbath

 

Band site: www.finespunmusic.com

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Don't forget to say "yo!" and "ma homie" alot and always nod your head slowly to any music and bounce your hands up if its really good.

Nic

"i must've wrote 30 songs the first weekend i met my true love ... then she died and i got stuck with this b****" - Father of the Pride
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HAHA thanks afro-man. Maybe I'll get really famous and do some work in the UK someday.

Hmm...maybe not.

But there are some good studios in NYC, no? And how many bass players we got here in the Big Apple? Hmm feirce competition for session spots, I'd say. Or for anything for that matter. I'm just happy I got 2 bands full of guys I like that get together every week (almost).

But I am considering session work as a matter of taking the bass more seriously and not just for self-gratification. We'll see.

"The world will still be turning when you've gone." - Black Sabbath

 

Band site: www.finespunmusic.com

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Originally posted by Bumpcity:

What they said (everyone above).

...and NEVER, EVER BE LATE TO A SESSION DATE!!! There are no excuses a producer wants to hear other than calling in from the emergency room, and bad news gets around very fast in those circles.

:wave:

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One way that I've been trying to get some session work going? Start hanging at some Open-Mic's and talk with some of the singer-songwriters. Some of them are ready to cut demos and they might need someone to play on their stuff.

 

I've been giving people like that CD's that I played on so that they can check out what I can do. That plus a business card are a good first step. In fact, if you're just getting started, do it for free. Get your name and sound out there first and foremost. After people hear more of you and that you can help their project, THEN I think you can worry about charging them. I've been taking the same angle in trying to produce some projects as well. In that instance, I would have a few more provisions in place, but it's the same angle.

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