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OH NO our drummer cancelled rehearsals for at least 3 weeks


Rick Hoffman

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Yea our drummer is married and has obligations with work, etc etc blah blah. thats cool and all, but I was really lookin forward to rehearsal...

ah well when your in a band I guess you have to respect each other's needs right?

so how does this relate to bass? well, the guitars wanna meet up and write, which is cool, but most of what I play comes from the feel I get off the beat of the drum. so to me it would be like, doin it half ass. I dunno I wanna get a replacement for now but that was shot down. I don't wanna sit around and do nonsense I need a drummer to lock on to.

I would love to just hang around studios and jam with random bands...

well anyhow things are still good we'll just have to pick it up again in a month...

"The world will still be turning when you've gone." - Black Sabbath

 

Band site: www.finespunmusic.com

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bring a drum machine, or loop player, they have great time, no unneeded fills, don't drink, don't smoke, don't cancel rehearsals, won't steal your girlfriend.. should i go on?

my rhythm generators and i spend a lot of quality time alone..

Praise ye the LORD.

....praise him with stringed instruments and organs...

Let every thing that hath breath praise the LORD.

excerpt from- Psalm 150

visit me at:

www.adriangarcia.net

for His glory

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It's a drag not playing with a drummer when you're in a rock band. I agree that what a rock bass player does has a lot to do with the drums.

 

If you guys are rehearsing, though...worry about writing the songs. Take the opportunity to write some songs that can stand on their own without the arrangement.

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I agree. Rock band without a drummer doesn't work. I always felt the bassist ties the guitar and the drum together, harmonizing with the guitar (or keyboard) and keeping time with the durmmer.

 

For the short term, a drum machine isn't a bad suggestion. Biggest advantage is that they don't get mad or hurt feelings when you smack it for speeding up.

 

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn

 

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The nice thing about a drum machine as opposed to a drummer is that you only have to punch the information in once. :D

 

When I was younger, I felt as if I could not play without a drummer. As my playing progressed I changed my mind. There are times now when I prefer to play without a drummer.....it means that I am the complete time authority and no one messes with me. (As if that's any different than when I do play with a drummer. :evil: )

 

Remember that Larry Graham developed his pioneering style because he played without a drummer. (He played in a duo with his mother who played organ. He began slapping to simulate the sound and feel of drums).

 

You should be able to hold down the time by yourself. Take this next few weeks as an opportunity to work on this. The other players will start trusting you as you start trusting yourself and tightening up your time.

 

As you work out new songs you will be able to create your own basslines and when the drummer gets back he will have to work around what you have created.

 

Have fun!

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LOL...I'm probably the odd one here. I've played drums (off and on) since I was a teenager (over 20 years). I have an electronic kit upstairs in the bonus room, and my old Premier Projectors (Candy-Apple red...a really, really sweet sounding LOUD kit) upstairs in the attic in cases. I've played drums more than twice as long as I've played bass. There are people who tell me I should forget bass and just play drums. (But then there's people who tell me I should forget drums and just play bass. I intend to keep doing both.) In reality, I believe that I am a better drummer than I am a bassist...there's very little I can't play on drums, but there's plenty I can't play on bass. Like life itself, learning more and more about how to make these things make music is a work in progress. You're never done...it's not a destination, it's a journey.

 

There's a few interesting things I'd like to note.

 

1) Playing drums before I learned to play bass made me a better bassist (or this is my belief). I've been told I play a bass like it's a drum kit...I just hold it differently. Seriously, I generally concentrate on rhythm first and melody second (although a close second).

 

2) Playing bass made me a better drummer. Now I actually clearly understand what a bassist needs from a drummer.

 

3) Overall, I also learned quite a few things about arranging songs...when the bass is busy the drums should be simple, when the drums are busy the bass should be simple...same thing applies to all the instruments, including vocals. Lots of contrast makes for a really, REALLY interesting song that actually SOUNDS GOOD when you play it live or record it.

 

4) Many times less is more. Occassionally, more is more, but usually less is more. Again, contrast really strikes me...and so few songs (in general) have any...particularly rock songs.

 

5) I love a drum machine, but a real drummer is still better, even if his time isn't nearly as perfect as the drum machine's. Drum machines typically don't know how to come in behind the beat or in front of it on purpose...and if you could tell them how to do that, it would be too complicated to mess with. Human drummers do it auto-magically (sometimes unconsciously favoring one or the other). Music, IMHO, should be a living breathing thing, just likes it's creators. Time variance that falls in the category of mere sloppiness isn't what I'm referring to. Time variance that is a product of the excitement of a song actually adds to the excitement of the song. That's my opinion anyway.

 

Dave

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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The past year I've cycled through three drummers and learned how to program the drum machine on my Zoom pedal. My singer uses a Roland unit and has gotten good at seleting/editing patches for his originals. So we get by for now, but I am foaming at the mouth for a live drummer.

 

Trouble is, I need to find one who's brain works away from the drum kit as well. Not as easy as it sounds, there is an insanity inherent in nearly all drummers. Must be in their DNA.

:D

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nothing's wrong with sitting down with guitar players and writing music. you'll wind up having more input as to the general melody of the piece and you'll probably find you like that material more.

 

sure not having a drummer around for rehearsals will suck but: a- he probably pulls as much from what you're doing as you do from him and b- what a great time this is to address the rhythm problems you know the guitar players are having.

Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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Writing - cool idea.

Rehearsing anyway - cool idea. In larger organizations (orchestras, concert bands) they call it "sectional rehearsals" - you can work on arrangements, individual parts, vocals, etc.

 

I've played with a guitarist, and it always surprises me how much harder it is on some tunes - I have to concentrate on the rhythm (I keep saying to myself "be the beat") instead of flying round at will.

 

Find a jam and do that during the non-drummer time.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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You guys all came up with great suggestions.

:idea: The studio guy has his own kit, along with the kit we rehearse with, in the same space. He might fill in for us after we sit and come up with something...its all recorded live so we can show our drummer when he gets back :freak:

You know something I think I should be more thankful for the 'mates I got...recently I've been looking at other bands. The grass isn't always greener... :rolleyes:

"The world will still be turning when you've gone." - Black Sabbath

 

Band site: www.finespunmusic.com

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Dave brings up some pretty good points. Especially in rock, it is very important for the bassist to be able to lock in on the drums, which is why rehesal is very important. Guitars can wander off once in a while and no one really notices.

 

I have read many articles in PBM about simplicity in the bass line. Works well for me because I'm a pretty simple bassist. Keep with the kick, the snare and the open hat, nail 3 or 5 notes in the chord and you can fake though just about anything.

 

Jazz is a whole 'nother matter.

 

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn

 

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