Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Giving up the 5...


J.A.

Recommended Posts

Well, I've been playing almost 7 years. For 6 of those years I've had a Fender jazz bass. I love the sound I get out ofd it. I'm not a bad player, but Jaco wouldn't have anything to worry about. Last July, I bought a Warwick Corvette FNA 5 string, because I was going to start a metal band.

I knew it was going to take some time to adjust after 6 years of 4 string, but a few weeks ago, I realized that although I played the 5 string 90% of the time, I still felt 10 times more comfortable and confident on the Fender. At first I thought I should get new pickups or something for the Warwick so it would sound more like the Fender, but that wouldn't solve the problem.

Now, the warwick is sitting in my favorite music store on consignment, and I have a Fender Fr-51 resonator bass on order(for whenever they release more). Someday I might go to 5 again, but not before I'd give upright a try. Has anyone else tried 5 string for a bit and gone back to 4?

Insert inaccurate quote here
Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 17
  • Created
  • Last Reply

I have a 5 but mainly play the 4 string..

I am 100% comfortable on the 4 and about 75% comfortable on the 5...

 

I have a crystal clear picture of the 4 string fingerboard in my head ...

the pix on the 5 string is a little fuzzy and that impacts the way I play..

www.danielprine.com

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've had my 2001 Yamaha 5 (green monster, as I like to call it) for nearly a year now. Feels like my other basses, only bigger, and more of an extended range (24 frets). I need to change my amp at some point, though. Thomas Wilburn 's current GK thread has me jonesing... :D

 

I play whatever's right for the song. I'll admit that I have been using the five more, as it can coax many sounds. But sometimes I just need that vintage vibe, so my old trusty Yamaha 4 from 1987 does that for me.

 

Don't ever get rid of that five if you can help it. Seeing Mark Egan with Pat Martino definitely inspired me in some way. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have debated giving up my fretless 6 and going to a 4. I only use it for my own practice of Yellowjackets tunes I will never play out.

 

I find I could get by with a pair of 4's for most of my playing right now.

 

I'm just afraid that when I sell it, I'll need it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Go figure- as for electrics, I prefer wide necks and narrow string spacing; my five-string fite the bill. Oddly enough, the only time I find myself using the low B is when I'm jamming in a dropped tuning such as "drop D" or 1/2 step.

 

BTW- I despise playing in those tunings...

...think funky thoughts... :freak:
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am much more at ease with my 5 than my 4 for some reason. Guess that since I started playing again after many years and bought a 5 string almost right way and play it more, it would go to figure.

 

I hate drop tuning, too.

 

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by justinruins:

Now, the warwick is sitting in my favorite music store on consignment, and I have a Fender Fr-51 resonator bass on order(for whenever they release more). Someday I might go to 5 again, but not before I'd give upright a try.

Quitter.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by PickPunk:

Who says you need a 5 for metal? and who says you cant use a j bass for metal ? :freak:

 

anyway, i think its all a matter of what you're comfortable playing.

True, but if you do play in a trio setting, a 5 or 6 can be incredibly useful, especially if you lack a second guitar or keyboardist, and can put out a few chords every now and then.

 

Yeah, it's not for everyone, but once you start playing with those multi-headed beasts, they offer you something a 4 can't. I still use a 4 quite frequently, though, in various dropped tunings these days. (I have two of them). It's just a matter of opening your mind to the possibilities, and then making it useful when it comes to these monsters. Isn't that the point of being an artist anyway, not confining yourself too much into a corner? :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmmm. Seems like you're being a bit hasty. I had one heck of a time adjusting from four to five (I had been playing four-string about fifteen years before making the switch).

 

I gig regularly and began making quite a few mistakes during live performances - really did some damage to my ego. My biggest problem was that I was playing both the 4 and the 5. When I got rid of the 4 by trading it in on a second 5, it didn't take long for me to get into the swing o' things. I'm still screwing up during live performances but not nearly as much - and playing a five-string has revitalized my interest in the instrument.

 

You should probably just have the thing in your hands whenever possible (watching TV, sittin' on the couch, sittin' in front of the 'puter - whatever) and practice and fiddle around with it as much as you can. Eventually the four-string will become the weird-feeling instrument - trust me.

 

Now go get your damn bass out of that music store before someone buys it!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All to often dropped tunings are the rut that bands find themselves in.

 

One rather common misconcepion a lot of young bands I work with have is that tuning in half-step makes you sound "heavier."

...think funky thoughts... :freak:
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree that this sounds hasty. I just got my first 5 in January or February, & I'm surprised at how comfortable I am on it already. It's the one I play most of the time now. That's not because I'm so wonderful a player, but because I got it right at the same time I got the first song list for a new band, & it turned out I needed a 5 to play that list (how's that for timing!). So I've been forced to rehearse & rehearse & rehearse some more exclusively on the 5. That got me up to speed pretty quick. Now I can find the notes on it, keep it from ringing, & not get confused about what string I'm on. Phew!

 

Maybe that kind of experience is what you need, too?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I gave it a year. During that year, I held off starting a band until I felt more comfortable with the 5. Now I'm trying to make up for lost time with the 4. After 2 weeks, I'm feeling pretty good on it. The only problem I'm going to have now is one of my guitar players I want to use plays almost exclusively on a 7 string. I'll be damned if I tune that low. On a side-note, I've been experimenting using a capo, and am quite enjoying it. anyone here picked up any cool tricks or anything about capos?
Insert inaccurate quote here
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've almost always played 5s. I haven't played a 4 on a gig for 6-7 years.

 

But I've just bought a 4 string Jazz. So far I've only played it at home, but I love the sound and feel and I'm tempted to make it my main gigging bass. I will only know once I've gigged it a few times - I'm still slightly concerned a great sound at home will turn into a lack of definition in a gig situation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...