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history of bass guitar...


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i am doing a power point presentation on the history of basses. just wondering if there is any really important highlights in bass history that are wouild need to be included. any interesting comments would be helpful too.

-BGO

 

5 words you should live by...

 

Music is its own reward

 

---------------

My Band: www.Myspace.com/audreyisanarcissist

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Try a search for this, lots of useful info to be had.

 

here's some-

 

Les Paul's "log", first practical electric solidbody.

Leo Fender, somehow got everything right.

Alembic, active handmade exotic basses, ushered in the era of "boutique" basses.

Ned Steinberger, designed many fine instruments, including the eponymous bass that brought headless and carbon fiber designs to the masses.

Ampeg, designed some of the first electric basses, as well as an amp or 2.

 

Have fun!

 

Peace,

 

wraub

 

I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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Don't forget Rickenbacker, first neck through body construction.

 

Also, dont forget the origin of the name "Precision Bass." Not only was it the first electric solid-body bass, it was also the first to have frets, allowing the bassist to play with "precision."

Mudcat's music on Soundclick

 

"Work hard. Rock hard. Eat hard. Sleep hard. Grow big. Wear glasses if you need 'em."-The Webb Wilder Credo-

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Yup,

 

Searching will help.

 

What are you doing the presentation for? Class, I'm assuming? Are you just trying to get a bunch of guys to do your work for you? ;)

 

Well, I'll give you some things to run with.

 

I'll get on board with Wraub regarding notable people in the industry (no particular order).

 

1. Les Paul (father of solidbody guitars)

 

2. Leo Fender (mass marketer, innovator)

 

3. Ned Steinberger (designed countless guitars and basses, including the Steinberger, the NS series of Spectors (and the Warwick Streamer rip-off), the Warwick Thumb, and others)

 

4. The folks at Alembic (for using different materials and innovative electronics)

 

5. Mike Tobias (for helping create the new boutique market, partially by selling his name to Gibson and creating a market for his pre-Gibson axes!)

 

Honorable mentions to Rick Turner and Jack Read.

 

Top five most influencial/recognizable basses (in order):

 

1. Fender Precision

2. Fender Jazz

3. Ric 4000-series

4. Musicman Stingray

5. Hofner Violin Bass

 

Top five most influencial players (no order):

 

1. Sir Paul

2. Jaco

3. James Jamerson

4. John Paul Jones

5. Carol Kaye

 

Tough to quantify such things, just my thoughts.

 

Funny how much I stray from what I percieve as the majority when it comes to these things. :D

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Originally posted by getz76:

the NS series of Spectors (and the Warwick Streamer rip-off)

I'd like to point out that buying a design of another company doesn't count as ripping them off.

Nic

"i must've wrote 30 songs the first weekend i met my true love ... then she died and i got stuck with this b****" - Father of the Pride
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Originally posted by Afro_boy:

Originally posted by getz76:

the NS series of Spectors (and the Warwick Streamer rip-off)

I'd like to point out that buying a design of another company doesn't count as ripping them off.

Nic

Agreed. Buying something and then paying for it would not count as ripping someone off. It was the paying part Warwick forgot to do. ;)

 

(PS, I own a Streamer)

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Originally posted by jeremyc:

You could get this book:

 

American Basses by Jim Roberts

and just get all the info from the introduction.

 

The book is only $20. But since you don't like buying things, perhaps you can find it in a music store and surreptitiously copy out information into your notebook.

If you take J's advice, please make sure to credit Mr. Roberts in the bibliography or at least in a footnote.
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Originally posted by getz76:

Originally posted by jeremyc:

You could get this book:

 

American Basses by Jim Roberts

and just get all the info from the introduction.

 

The book is only $20. But since you don't like buying things, perhaps you can find it in a music store and surreptitiously copy out information into your notebook.

If you take J's advice, please make sure to credit Mr. Roberts in the bibliography or at least in a footnote.
As long as the plagiarism police are making an appearance, it's still usually considered plagiarism if you get the majority of your material from one source, even if you cite it properly. I'd look up stuff on the 'net or in other books on the people that have been suggested here. Perhaps the book Jeremy suggested can provide you with a useful outline, but you'll want other sources to fill in the details.
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BGO- Go to NPR archives and search fender bass; I remember listening to an interview on All Things Considered with a big musical somebody who was putting forth the proposition that the Fender Electric Bass was the most important musical happening of the 20th century and had a transformitive effect on the way music was played today. Great interview.

 

 

www.ethertonswitch.com

 

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There is, IMHO, simply no better resource for the history of the electric bass guitar than "The Bass Book" by Tony Bacon.

 

Here\'s the Amazon link.

 

You must not ignore this book, if you want your presentation to be complete. It is also chock-ful of goodies, including a copy of Leo Fender's patent application for the Precision, an appendix of virtually every bass ever manufactured with company name and dates, also a system for dating instruments by serial numbers for certain manufacturers. Every significant model of bass ever made is photographed in color, and in almost ever instance it is the exact one that is most famous...pic's of Entwhistle's Spider bass, Palladino's Musicman Fretless, McCartney's Hofner, Chris Squire's Rick, Jaco's Jazz, Sting's Aria...and hundreds more.

 

Those would make a great powerpoint presentation.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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Ok, here's the real history of bass: In 1957 Leo Fender came up with the be all end all of basses. After he sold his company to CBS they made at least one really great bass in 1973 (they made the neck of that bass in August of 1972). After a group of of employees bought the company from CBS they made another really great bass in 2000.

There might have been a couple of other good basses throughout the years, but that's the history of bass to the best of my knowledge.

"Start listening to music!".

-Jeremy C

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this is for my Computer tech class. it is our final for the year (do a power point presentation on something you are interested in). though the internet gives u many contradicory facts, a small group of knowledgable bass players would be much better.

 

You could get this book:

 

American Basses by Jim Roberts

and just get all the info from the introduction.

 

The book is only $20. But since you don't like buying things, perhaps you can find it in a music store and surreptitiously copy out information into your notebook.

 

umm, i don't get it. how do i not like to buy things. :confused:

-BGO

 

5 words you should live by...

 

Music is its own reward

 

---------------

My Band: www.Myspace.com/audreyisanarcissist

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Sorry, BGO, I unfairly accused you of not wanting to buy things. There was someone else that used to ask for information and then wanted to download programs and books and music all the time, and I was momentarily confused.

 

I know you're buying a great new bass and it will arrive any day (if it hasn't already).

 

Can we still be friends?

 

Try this link: I just typed "history of the double bass" into google and this was the third one on the list.

 

A Brief History of the Double Bass

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I think I'd approach the assignment from a "question-based" stance. Since you've said your topic is the history of bass guitar, you've at least pared it down to about 50 years. What would an intelligent, curious person want to know about that history?

 

* When did it begin? Why did anyone feel the need to invent it, and who did?

* Is it a kind of guitar, or a kind of bass?

* What's the basic "layout" of the instrument? What are the basic parts? How do you get sound out of it?

* What's the right way to hold it?

* How is its history related to that of electric amplification?

* How has the ability to amplify the bass changed the way people make music?

* What are some of the major technical innovations in bass-making?

* What artists have contributed to it musically, and how? Are there any bass virtuosos? Anyone the average person might have heard of?

* What different playing techniques have people come up with, and what's their purpose?

* What sorts of roles do basses play in musical combos? Is there any music that specifically features the bass?

* What does sheet music for the bass look like? Chord charts? What's the difference? How much is read, and how much is improvised?

* Is it very difficult to learn? Do you need any special physical characterstics or skills?

* Why frets? Why fretless? Why one number of strings or another?

 

And so on. I think people have given you a lot of input on most of these questions, & the info is out there to answer all of them, within surprisingly easy reach. My point is that there are a LOT of ways to approach the subject. It's good to know that, since you can't overestimate the importance of logical order in a presentation. And one of the virtues of Powerpoint is that it seems reward presentations that are more logically arranged.

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Sorry, BGO, I unfairly accused you of not wanting to buy things. There was someone else that used to ask for information and then wanted to download programs and books and music all the time, and I was momentarily confused.

 

I know you're buying a great new bass and it will arrive any day (if it hasn't already).

 

Can we still be friends?

 

Try this link: I just typed "history of the double bass" into google and this was the third one on the list.

 

A Brief History of the Double Bass

lol, it's totally ok. my bass will arrive this Friday *giddy as a school girl*.

 

thank you all you guys (girls), the only thing that i am trying to figure out, is where the first stand up bass appeared. i can't buy any books, cuase the report is due this wednesday, so no time to order it online, or go somewhere to find it. thanks again.

-BGO

 

5 words you should live by...

 

Music is its own reward

 

---------------

My Band: www.Myspace.com/audreyisanarcissist

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I read the link about double bass history that I posted and it looks like there is no conclusive answer to that question.

 

It's easy to find the date of the first creation of an instrument for something created this century. (Or maybe not so easy....someone is always turning up some "one of a kind prototype" that predates Leo Fender's work).

 

But for an instrument which may be 500 years old, you have to look at paintings and writings about music and try to make an educated guess as to when the instrument first started showing up.

 

It might be more relevant to try to pinpoint a date when the double bass began to be used as a jazz instrument. Early jazz used a tuba and at some point there was a switch to double bass.

 

That information might be a little more relevant to the use of the bass in the popular music of today.

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the library has nothing on bass sadly
You should be able to use the library at your local university. Well, you could if you were in Australia. Do they charge entry to libraries in the states?
A man is not usually called upon to have an opinion of his own talents at all; he can very well go on improving them to the best of his ability without deciding on his own precise niche in the temple of Fame. -- C.S.Lewis
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Originally posted by tom rivet:

Do they charge entry to libraries in the states?

Nope. I've done research at public libraries, state university libraries, and private university libraries, and the doors are all wide open. Borrowing is another matter (although sometimes it can be arranged), but access to stacks is free. And if a public library branch doesn't have what you're looking for, they can order it for you as long as it's in the system. (Universities can do this, too, and the systems are quite large; but you'll need a card. However, universities will usually have some scheme whereby members of the public can purchase some form of heightened library priveleges.)

 

A university library might be especially useful here, since universities tend to have music departments, which of course require their own stacks. At some schools, the music dept may actually have a whole library of its own.

 

Libraries: good.

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