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Big Muff Distortion pedal, for bass?


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Hey,

 

does anyone have any experiance using the Big Muff Pi distortion/sustainer pedal? i know that it's for guitar, but i plugged it into my bass to try it out, and it sounded really good. the only thing, it makes the bass, much quiter when it is switched on, is this normal (same thing happens with a wah pedal). just wanted to see if there were warnings about using guitar pedals for bass. thanks!

-BGO

 

5 words you should live by...

 

Music is its own reward

 

---------------

My Band: www.Myspace.com/audreyisanarcissist

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I never tried the Big Muff but there is a patch on the new Boss ME 50B called Muff Fuzz which was COSM'ed after the Big Muff.

Its sounds real good but I have not A / B'ed the two. You might give the Boss a listen ..it has a few different types of distortion and overdrive on it...each one is adjustable...

www.danielprine.com

 

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i use a big muff for my set up. how are you hooking it up? i found if you are going through the amps effects loop you really have to crank the level. if you put it in a chain before your amp it should work much better.

ahh, i see. good to hear that i can use it with a bass.

 

the way i was using it was through my Carvin R1000 head, and Carvin 4x10 cab. i had it hooked up to the effects loop with a Wah pedal, and a Flanger pedal.

 

so you are saying for best results:

 

[bass]-[big muff]-[wah-wah]-[flanger]-[instrument imput on amp]

 

thus, instead of using the effects loop, i go straight to into the imput. thank you very much.

-BGO

 

5 words you should live by...

 

Music is its own reward

 

---------------

My Band: www.Myspace.com/audreyisanarcissist

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The Big Muff Pi is commonly used in bass effect chains, so there is no problem there. Also the loss of volume and/or tone is a common problem with effects chains especially with analog pedals (digital effects have their short comings as well)this is the reason that pedals with "true bypass" are greatly desired. If it is a real problem you can try adding a boost pedal to your chain or an A/B/Y switch to bypass the entire effects chain or run dual signals (FX & Clean).

 

Cheers

Nothing is as it seems but everything is exactly what it is - B. Banzai

 

Life is what happens while you are busy playing in bands.

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The Big Muff Pi is commonly used in bass effect chains, so there is no problem there. Also the loss of volume and/or tone is a common problem with effects chains especially with analog pedals (digital effects have their short comings as well)this is the reason that pedals with "true bypass" are greatly desired. If it is a real problem you can try adding a boost pedal to your chain or an A/B/Y switch to bypass the entire effects chain or run dual signals (FX & Clean).

 

Cheers

mmmm, very interesting. thank you very much, i learn something new everyday here on the lowdown. i do have a Carvin footswitch, that i can turn my entire effects chain off with one switch. i think that's what you mean by "true bypass"?

 

thanks again. :)

-BGO

 

5 words you should live by...

 

Music is its own reward

 

---------------

My Band: www.Myspace.com/audreyisanarcissist

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actually true bypass is when you turn that particular pedal off the signal passes through it without the pedal changing the tone of the orignal signal. if going through your effects loop causes the drop then an easy fix is going through the pedals before it goes to your amp. i love the big muff. i think it is the best distotion for bass. that cliff burton tone. even jason newsted used it too.
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Actually no BGO.

 

When you put an effect pedal into your signal chain your signal still travels through the circuitry even when the pedal is "off" causing a slight degradation of the tone/signal.This becomes more pronounced as the number of pedals in the chain is increased. A pedal with "true bypass" will route the signal directly through the pedal 'bypassing' the circuitry completely thus preserving the integrity of the signal.

Nothing is as it seems but everything is exactly what it is - B. Banzai

 

Life is what happens while you are busy playing in bands.

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from what i understand the problem with loss of volume is that most pedals designed for guitars are designed for just that and don't know what to do with a low frequency.

 

i too have used a big muff when i wanted a fuzz tone because it gave me the best one. i would use it for just that because most distortion pedals give too sever of an effect to just use it to warm up your tone.

 

but this probably has more information than i could give you.

Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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My experience is that most pedals sound better between the bass and the amp rather than through the effects loop.

 

I only use the effects loop for rack-mounted gear.

 

It has to do with levels but I don't know enough about electronics to explain it.

 

By the way, BGO, did that new bass come in yet?

 

well, i tried playing with my wah and flanger on, without using the effects loop, but it seemed exactly the same. the flanger works fine, but the wah makes the bass a lot quieter. the only explanation i can think of, is that since the wah pedal makes the bass go a bit higher then normal, the bass low frequency speakers don't have enough high end to make it as loud as the low.

 

jeremyc-nope, the guy had to order it from the factory, so it should be coming any time now.

:)

-BGO

 

5 words you should live by...

 

Music is its own reward

 

---------------

My Band: www.Myspace.com/audreyisanarcissist

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Originally posted by jeremyc:

My experience is that most pedals sound better between the bass and the amp rather than through the effects loop.

 

I only use the effects loop for rack-mounted gear.

 

It has to do with levels but I don't know enough about electronics to explain it.

It's possible to use pedals in effects loops. Either you need to test it out, or look for controls like a wet/dry knob, or an effects loop level.

 

What a wet/dry knob does is control the amount of effect you want added to your signal. It's usually used in amps that employ parallel wiring in the effects loop.

 

As for a level switch, what this does is optimize the signal for use with pedals, or rack mounted units.

 

See this page for more info. (watch out for the popup)

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