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My first conversation with Jeremy C.


bassdrummer

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When I was newer and greener on this forum, I met someone who . . . well, how else can I say it? Someone who changed my life.

 

It was a turning point. More than that: It was a "Low" point! ;)

 

It was my first conversation with Jeremy C.

 

I have pasted it for you here. Read. Learn.

Enjoy.

 

bd: means that I'm talking.

jc: means that He's talking.

 

-----------------

(The thread topic was "Simple Bass Parts and Bass Players We Love")

 

bd:

 

Adam Clayton - U2

 

Nate Mendel - Foo Fighters

 

Great groovers.

 

Question: Who played bass on "My City Was Gone" by The Pretenders? I love that bass line.

 

. . .

 

jc:

 

When you learned the "My City Was Gone" bass line, did you learn the mistakes in it note-for-note?

 

Adam Clayton is definitely an example of right-place-right-time. He was a complete beginner when he joined that band. He still plays like a complete beginner. It annoys me that now he does it on a collection of vintage axes.

 

Maybe you think that his bass parts are perfect for the songs. And that the Edge actually knows how to play more than one note at a time. What is the big deal with this band?, there's nothing musical at all going on that I can hear.

 

. . .

 

bd:

 

Cool, a completely different opinion. I do think Clayton's parts are perfect for the songs. I love what he played back then and what he plays now. And I'm a beginner. I'm a drummer who, along with many other drummers (according to Modern Drummer magazine) appreciates the way Clayton locks in with Larry Mullen Jr.

 

Remember, I'm a beginner. I haven't yet learned how to play "My City Was Gone." But I'm working on it! (Mistakes in the bass line? I guess I wouldn't know! )

 

Clayton inspired me (still does) to play bass, and "My City Was Gone" challenges me as a beginner to learn what I think is a great riff that sticks in my head. By the way, who played that bass line? I still want to know -- despite the number of "mistakes" in the bass line.

 

. . .

 

jc:

 

Yeah, I keep hearing that the drums and bass are "locked in" in U2. Considering how basic the parts they are playing, what would be surprising is if they weren't locked in.

 

You want to hear locked in? Listen to Paul Jackson and Mike Clark of the Headhunters. Or Gary Grainger and Dennis Chambers on John Scofield's Blue Matter album (and they had one rehearsal).

 

Don't give me locked in when everyone is playing eighth notes.

 

. . .

 

bd:

 

Great comeback! I love it.

 

I guess it's "how basic the parts they are playing" that I love about it. Do you like any bass players/bass parts that are "basic?"

 

And . . .

Who played bass on "My City Was Gone?"

 

. . .

 

jc:

 

Here are the credits for the Pretenders album, but I don't know who played on which song.

Paul Carrack - Piano, Vocals

Andrew Bodnar - Bass, Guitar (Bass), Vocals

Billy Bremner - Guitar, Guitar (Rhythm), Vocals

Tony Butler - Bass, Guitar (Bass)

Martin Chambers - Drums, Vocals

Steve Churchyard - Engineer

Pete Farndon - Bass, Vocals

Malcolm Foster - Bass, Vocals

James Honeyman-Scott - Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals

Chrissie Hynde - Guitar, Vocals

Robbie McIntosh - Guitar, Vocals

Chris Thomas - Producer

 

As for simple rhythm sections, the top of my list is Booker T and the MGs.

 

. . .

 

bd:

 

Thanks for bearing with me, jeremy! Holy cow, that's a long list of credits for that album; thanks!

 

Booker T. and the MG's! Good call. That quarter note ride cymbal pattern on "Green Onions" is legendary among drummers. It swings hard in its simplicity.

"All the world's indeed a stage, and we are merely players..."

--Rush, "Limelight"

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Good one, bassd, thanks for that. J is just ripe with berries of wisdom, waiting to be picked for nourishment and enjoyment.

Plus, I understand he likes the color blue. And some berries are blue. Hmmmm...

 

BTW, I had always heard it was Pete Farndon on that Pretenders track. That is a cool line, and again Jeremy is right-lotsa "mistakes" in that one. I think it's a combination of groove and heroin making for the laid back feel, but it works.

Really too bad about the heroin, though. Pete F. and James Honeyman Scott both fought that monkey and lost. Too sad.

 

Peace,

 

wraub

 

I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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Originally posted by wraub:

And some berries are blue.

 

George Carlin contends that blueberries are not really blue, but purple. He also contends that there is a grand conspiracy and someone's got all the blue food... :D

 

Jeremy's been feelin' the luv from us for a while now. It's probably time to amp up the hatin'! ;):D

 

I am pleased to have met the man in person. He is a great one.

 

Peace.

--s-dub

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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Jeremy is the Yoda of this forum.

 

Which makes Tom an Ewok or something.

 

I'm bucking for Darth Vader... but ya know.. someone else might want that one.

\m/

Erik

"To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting."

--Sun Tzu

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Not to highjack the thread, but- from amg.com

 

Artist The Pretenders

Album Title Learning to Crawl

Date of Release Jan 21, 1984 (release)

 

"Besides the Allman Brothers, perhaps the only other rock band to lose bandmembers under exactly the same circumstances (and almost exactly one year apart) was the Pretenders, when guitarist James Honeyman-Scott and bassist Pete Farndon both succumbed to drug overdoses during the early '80s. Farndon was born on June 2, 1952, and hailed from Hereford, England. After traveling around the world during the early-mid '70s, which included a stint in Australia (where he was a brief member of the folk rock outfit, the Bushwackers) and Hong Kong (where he indulged so heavily in drugs that his teeth rotted away), Farndon returned back to Hereford by the end of the decade. With England still caught up in the punk craze, Farndon looked to form a new group, and met guitarist/singer/songwriter Chrissie Hynde through a local drummer friend. After jamming on a few soul obscurities and Hynde originals (at a rehearsal space Farndon described as "the scummiest basement I've ever been in my life"), Farndon was welcomed onboard as a bassist.

"Chrissie Hynde and drummer Martin Chambers reassembled the Pretenders in 1982, following the death of James Honeyman-Scott and the departure of bassist Pete Farndon. Learning to Crawl, appropriately, is the sound of a band coming to grips with loss and the responsibilities that come with maturity. Even though the subject matter is undeniably serious, the Pretenders rock with a vigorous energy that was missing on Pretenders II. It helps that Hynde's songs are among her best, of course. "Middle of the Road" encapsulates the contradictions in the album's main themes; "Back on the Chain Gang" is a moving tribute to Scott; "My City Was Gone" is a vicious attack on Reagan-era economic devastation; and the beautiful, ringing "2000 Miles" is one of the few rock & roll songs about Christmas to actually work. And while "Watching the Clothes" is a bit embarrassing, it isn't enough to stop Learning to Crawl from being one of the best rock & roll records of the early '80s.

Farndon recommended fellow Hereford guitarist Honeyman-Scott to join up (and soonafter, another Hereford resident, drummer Martin Chambers), and by 1979, the Pretenders were up and running. A recording contract with the Sire label soon followed, as such subsequent albums as 1980's the Pretenders and 1981's Pretenders II, became worldwide hits - making the quartet one of new wave's biggest names. But bigtime success proved hard to handle for longtime pals Farndon and Honeyman-Scott, who both indulged heavily in drugs. By 1982, drug abuse had affected Farndon's playing and relationship with the others so badly that he was asked to leave the group. But in a cruel twist of fate, Honeyman-Scott was found dead from a cocaine-induced heart attack in London on June 16, 1982, only two days after Farndon's ousting. Farndon supposedly attempted to form another group in the wake of his exit from the Pretenders, but failed to do so. On April 14, 1983 (less than a year after Honeyman-Scott's death), Farndon was found dead in his apartment at the age of 30, having drowned in his bathtub after doing heroin."

 

It still seems unclear whether Farndon actually played on the track in question, or if his name was only on the record in an "honorary" capacity.

But the date of his death doesn't seem to preclude his participation on the finished product, studio time and label whims being what they are.

 

We now return to all things Cohen-tastic.

 

Peace,

 

wraub

 

I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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I'm sort of surprised by what Jeremy seems to have said... I haven't always liked U2, but I have HUGE respect for what they do. They're a great band, good songs, great lyrics... there's nothing wrong with eighth notes man.
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Originally posted by CMDN:

Jeremy is the Yoda of this forum.

 

Which makes Tom an Ewok or something.

 

I'm bucking for Darth Vader... but ya know.. someone else might want that one.

I'd say you would be like that evil wizard type dude. I forgot his name though.

 

(Phil <--- not a big starwars fan)

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Information about the bass found by the user can be, only if user needs to know.

 

Wanting to know and needing to know the same thing are not.

 

A journey of a thousand miles begin with one step does it.

 

Music many things can mean. The listener and player knows what it means are the only ones. Many meanings all can be right at the same time, YodaC says.

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Originally posted by jeremyc:

Information about the bass found by the user can be, only if user needs to know.

 

Wanting to know and needing to know the same thing are not.

 

A journey of a thousand miles begin with one step does it.

 

Music many things can mean. The listener and player knows what it means are the only ones. Many meanings all can be right at the same time, YodaC says.

I am literally weeping with laughter right now.

"For instance" is not proof.

 

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Originally posted by CMDN:

Jeremy is the Yoda of this forum.

 

Which makes Tom an Ewok or something.

 

I'm bucking for Darth Vader... but ya know.. someone else might want that one.

Well...to figure out a Darth Vader, we need a Luke Skywalker to play into the equation. I'm thinkin' maybe you Eric could be a D.V of sorts (thats meant as a compliment my Nugent/Marley friend)...so who may be the son of the Dark one? Hmmmmmmm, Bumpcity dare I say? :D
Donnie Peterson
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