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Royalties proposed for used CD sales


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Apparently some folks in the record industry have recently proposed [url=http://www.sduniontribune.com/news/business/20020614-9999_1b14usedcds.html]placing a federally-mandated tax on used CDs[/url] , which, according to [url=http://www.farces.com/stories/storyReader$526]this opinion piece[/url] , is a violation of the doctrine of first sale. Thoughts?
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Without analyzing all the legalese, it's as illogical as the idea several years ago that an additional tax was neede to offset the income lost to home taping. Illogical not because artists don't deserve compensation but because there's no way to accurately distribute such income. Further I really doubt any major label would make an honest effort to do so.
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The labels just need to get a freakin' clue and start 1) signing people who don't suck, and 2) lower CD prices. What I find much more interesting than the proposed royalties on used CD's, is this quote from the opinion piece: [quote] We're collectively downloading a shitload of music on the net and we're buying as much as we ever did. That's and, not or logic. The logic is borne out by research from Minneapolis-based Ipsos-Reid. The same tools that are used by the pirates to distribute bootleg recordings are also used by music-industry customers: fully 25% of all Americans older than 12 own a CD burner and 19% have downloaded music on the net. The most telling metric in the Ipsos-Reid research is that more than 80% of those who download music report that their CD purchasing has either remained the same or increased. That's reinforced by the industry's own revenue reports. Total 2001 sales were about US$13 billion which was unchanged from 2000; this year's sales are off by about 5% or so, but that's likely as attributable to the economic downturn as it is anything else. [/quote]And from Ipsos-Reid's own web site, the company that did the research: [quote]In addition, downloaders appear to have a voracious appetite for online music-related information, as over eight in ten (84%) report also using the Internet for more than just downloading, such as listening to song clips, reading about lyrics and tour information, and researching bands prior to actually purchasing their CD. And nearly half (47%) of these individuals indicate that they have subsequently purchased a particular CD from a band or artist solely because of something they first read or listened to on the Internet. Further, nearly one-third (29%) of American downloaders indicate that their typically preferred genre of music has changed since the inception of their downloading behaviors, and one-fifth (21%) of downloaders ages 12 and over report that their radio listening activities have also changed since they began downloading (see accompanying charts). This suggests that current music downloaders can be influenced by their online music activities, and may subsequently adjust offline listening and purchase behaviors as a result. [/quote]So... if a fifth of Americans have downloaded music off the Internet, then why, as the opinion piece says, aren't CD sales down by at least 20%? If a fourth of all Americans own a CD burner and can easily copy CD's from friends, or buy them, copy and resell them to a used CD store, then CD sales ought to be down by quite a bit MORE than 20%. The argument goes that no one would buy something when they could have it for free, but that just isn't true in this case (as the economist quoted admits). And that's not even counting all the CD sales of independent artists whose figures don't show up in RIAA charts. The record industry is just NOT getting the point. File sharing is NOT killing the industry, they're killing themselves. --Lee
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I absolutely agree with all comments. Somehow all the discussions since napster start all over again, specially since also AG was stopped by the RIAA. To add one more argument; TIME (read money) involved to get a good quality cd burned from mp3's; I really tested this out about a year ago.. 1. download let's say 14 mp3 at least 256kbps 2. decoding 14 files 3. editing and normalising 4. enhance the sound (f.i. with use of the sonic maximizer or manual with a good wave editor) 5. burn the cd 6. printwork Hence this is 8 hours work for one cd.
gigging favorites at the moment LP Special order 1973 and PRS custom 24
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