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Supernova-any opinions?


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No, even a supernova only takes out the solar system that it's in. If you want to do some serious damage you need something bigger. Sorry Marvin. -- Rob
I have the mind of a criminal genius.....I keep it in the freezer next to mother.
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How about a supernova generator? Point it at the star you wanna blow up and boom! Point it at a bunch of stars and watch the fireworks. Yeah, sure, we won't [b]see[/b] the fireworks for anywhere between one and several thousand years, but so what? -- Rob
I have the mind of a criminal genius.....I keep it in the freezer next to mother.
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[img]http://website.lineone.net/~novacane/marvin/pcs/dddyna.jpg[/img] Oh...you do [i]indeed[/i] have the mind of a criminal genius. May I borrow it for awhile? Of course, I'd have to thaw it out with my criminal mind freeze de-modulator...
"Cisco Kid, was a friend of mine"
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[quote]Originally posted by David R.: [b]What about a Chevy Nova? [img]http://www.novaman.net/images/Nova7a.jpg[/img][/b][/quote]Will it make an earth shattering kaboom, or do we need a Pinto for that? -- Rob
I have the mind of a criminal genius.....I keep it in the freezer next to mother.
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Dwarf said: [quote] Yo Dude, you probably wouldn't believe some of the nasty things that the US concocted. [/quote]Yeah, I know. The same episode of Nova described a contingency plan that the US had to invade Cuba in the 1970’s. They planned on using a bacteria that had similar effects on the human brain as LSD. It wouldn’t kill the populous, just incapacitate them so they wouldn’t fight. “Comrade, I would fight, but I have all these spiders on me!”
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[quote]Originally posted by TheWewus: [b]What about the Canadian menace?[/b][/quote]Please keep Alanis Morissette out of this. -- Rob
I have the mind of a criminal genius.....I keep it in the freezer next to mother.
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[quote]Originally posted by Dwarf: [b]No, even a supernova only takes out the solar system that it's in. If you want to do some serious damage you need something bigger.[/b][/quote]Well, if your star goes into a supernova, eventually it will expand as far as it can and begin to contract. Your star will then collapse in upon itself causing a singularity - a point having the weight and density of your star, but smaller than a speck of dust. The gravitational pull of your sigularity will be so intense that nothing -not even light- will be able to escape it. Thus a black hole. Over time, your black hole will eventually consume the chunk of galaxy you desire to have removed. Enjoy, and send me a post card! :)

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[quote]Originally posted by skip: [b]only if you keep it away from the Nuestro Foro forum-no va in Spainish means `no go`.[/b][/quote]It was actually a name which did not work for the spanish market. Would you buy a car named: "NoGo" or "NoMotion"? :D

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[quote]Originally posted by Super 8: [b] [quote]Originally posted by Dwarf: [b]No, even a supernova only takes out the solar system that it's in. If you want to do some serious damage you need something bigger.[/b][/quote]Well, if your star goes into a supernova, eventually it will expand as far as it can and begin to contract. Your star will then collapse in upon itself causing a singularity - a point having the weight and density of your star, but smaller than a speck of dust. The gravitational pull of your sigularity will be so intense that nothing -not even light- will be able to escape it. Thus a black hole. Over time, your black hole will eventually consume the chunk of galaxy you desire to have removed. Enjoy, and send me a post card! :) [/b][/quote]Only if your star is over a certain mass to begin with-for a red giant, for example, no problem. Otherwise, it would just be a really big cosmic cinder. Black holes have, in essence, infinite density and zero mass. Of course, if you are a very advanced manipulator of subtle energies, you can tap into the residual energies of burned-out stars. But that`s another topic...
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[quote]Originally posted by GusTraX: [b] [quote]Originally posted by skip: [b]only if you keep it away from the Nuestro Foro forum-no va in Spainish means `no go`.[/b][/quote]It was actually a name which did not work for the spanish market. Would you buy a car named: "NoGo" or "NoMotion"? :D [/b][/quote]Maybe they should have called it "pene grande"?? :D
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[quote]Originally posted by Franknputer: [b]Maybe they should have called it "pene grande"?? :D [/b][/quote]err... would YOU buy a car with that name? :freak:

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[quote]Originally posted by Super 8: [b] [quote]Originally posted by Dwarf: [b]No, even a supernova only takes out the solar system that it's in. If you want to do some serious damage you need something bigger.[/b][/quote]Well, if your star goes into a supernova, eventually it will expand as far as it can and begin to contract. Your star will then collapse in upon itself causing a singularity - a point having the weight and density of your star, but smaller than a speck of dust. The gravitational pull of your sigularity will be so intense that nothing -not even light- will be able to escape it. Thus a black hole. Over time, your black hole will eventually consume the chunk of galaxy you desire to have removed. Enjoy, and send me a post card! :) [/b][/quote]Actually, if the star goes nova(super or otherwise) it can't form a singularity. The explosion spreads its matter too far. For a singularity you start with a large star, Skip's red dwarf for example. If the star is massive enough, when it starts to die, its gravity will cause it to collapse, possibly into a singularity. If the star hasn't enough mass there's a good chance it will go nova. -- Rob
I have the mind of a criminal genius.....I keep it in the freezer next to mother.
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Technically, you just described a Nova, not a supernova. The Sun isn't massive enough to end up as a supernova - we can look forward to it becoming a Nova - but not soon enough for any of us to have to worry about. :) If you want to see what's left after a supernova, look at the Crab Nebula, in the constellation Orion. As far as balck holes are concerned, your description is in line with generally held scientific opinion. But not all stars end up as black holes. There's white dwarfs... The best thing about black holes is that even Brittney Spears can't escape one. [quote]Originally posted by Super 8: [b] [quote]Originally posted by Dwarf: [b]No, even a supernova only takes out the solar system that it's in. If you want to do some serious damage you need something bigger.[/b][/quote]Well, if your star goes into a supernova, eventually it will expand as far as it can and begin to contract. Your star will then collapse in upon itself causing a singularity - a point having the weight and density of your star, but smaller than a speck of dust. The gravitational pull of your sigularity will be so intense that nothing -not even light- will be able to escape it. Thus a black hole. Over time, your black hole will eventually consume the chunk of galaxy you desire to have removed. Enjoy, and send me a post card! :) [/b][/quote]
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More physics than you ever wanted to know.... A star is held in balance by the opposing forces of gravity, causing it to contract, and fusion, causing it to expand. The disturbance of either of these forces will cause the star to die, in one form or another. An average, sunlike star will expand as it fuses helium in it's core, once it's exausted that and other "light" atoms, up to iron, then it will contract to a brown dwarf. Heavier stars will fuse materials beyond iron as well, but this will eventually cause the star to shed it's outer layers violently (the supernova) If enough mass remains, it will form a black hole, otherwise it will form a white dwarf (Might be wrong on this), an extremly hot, dense star, probably no larger than the earth. It will eventually cool to become a "black dwarf", at least in theory. If you want to cause a supernova like explosion, just reduce the mass of the star quickly. This effect has been used, correctly, to destroy stars in the TV shows Andromeda, and Stargate SG-1. It was also implied in Babylon 5. Like I said, more than you ever wanted to know...
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