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Poll: Left, Right, Doesn't Matter


HypnoBassMan

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I thought that since I was asking everyone what they thought about which side of the drum set was the best to stand on, that I'd put up a poll to measure the opinions.

 

Please take the poll!

HypnoBassMan

 

The deeper you go the better you feel! (True for bass and hypnosis.)

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I voted for Hi-Hat (my drummer's left) as I'm usually on that side.

 

Also, because my drummer doesnt have a tom-tom "side"...THEY ARE ALL AROUND HIM!!!! Along with his almost 50 Piece KIT!! (exaggeration)

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Well, it doesn't really matter to me. I listen to the kicks and snare whereever I stand. I did play with a drummer who insisted I stand on his hat side. He had 12" high pitched hats and they made me deaf in my right ear after practice. On stage, I could get far enough away from him, but, our practice room was smaller than my closet, so I could not get away and earplugs did not help. He was really heavy handed. A top hat would last him 3 months, maybe.
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Much of where one stands onstage has to do with where the spotlight falls. In the Western world, we tend to look to the right after we've been looking at the center. Therefore, the focal point (usually the singer) naturally has front & center - and the predominant lead instrument stage left (in a rock band, usually the lead guitar).

 

In most instances the drummer is centering the backline. So to balance the lead instrument, the bassist should generally be found on the opposite side: stage right.

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I'm usually singing (lead or background) so I can't watch anyway. Plus I like to move around up front (I'm such a ham).

 

If I need to tighten up, I can do it by getting the drummers attention at whatever position I can.

 

I will say that when playing jams (where wvery night it was a different set of musicians) it did help to watch the drummer's foot - which I could do because I was on the hi-hat side.

 

I started a thread about this a while back.

 

See if this adds anything...

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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When i was about 14 years old ,and in my first band ,at our first practice the guitar player asked what side of the kit i wanted to stand on.I don't remember why but i chose to be on the drummers right(tom tom side).Ever since then i don't feel right standing in the other side.I usually just try to listen to the kick and snair,I can usually here both just fine and lock in to them.
i grew up watching TV and i turned out TV
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At Mr. Capasso's request, I've moved my answer here (and edited it a bit).

 

There are a lot of benefits to standing on the high hat side.

 

1)The drummer is slightly turned in that direction--to his left. (his right foot is facing forward and is left foot is at a slight angle). If you are right handed you are facing slightly to the right. If you are standing on the drummer's left, it is easier for the two of you to have eye contact without either of you having to turn.

 

2)The tom tom is not in the way and you can actually see his right foot. That way sometimes you can tell what he is playing by watching even if you can't tell by listening.

 

3)The drummer is actually keeping time on the high hat, so it's a good thing to be able to hear it well.

 

4)As someone else said, your bass neck will be facing away from the cymbals, so you are less likely to hit them.

 

Slightly OT aside for those of you running all over the place with your wireless.

 

The speed of sound is approx. 1100 feet per second. (This changes with temperature and humidity). For quick calculations, I'm rounding it off to 1000. This means that if you are 50 feet from the drummer, it will take the sound .05 seconds to reach you.

 

At a tempo of quarter note = 120, a sixteenth note is .125 seconds long.

 

For me, being .05 seconds off due to the time delay is an unacceptable error.

 

Stand by your drummer! (apologies to Tammy Wynette).

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When I first started playing I stayed on the left side (facing the band). I only did that was JPJ stood on the left side (facing towards the band) and I thought that was the right thing to do. After playing a couple of times in front of an audience I found it easier to be on the right side (facing the band) so I could see the kick drum,like Jeremy said, and the drummer and I made eye contact without looking over the Tom's. But recently i've been on both sides.
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I've done both over the years but prefer to be on the tom side. A lot of my work has been following artists. In those cases I feel better when I can keep an eye on the front person for visual cues and still be able to look at my bass neck. In addition I like to hear out of my left ear.

 

Wally

I have basses to play, places to be and good music to make!
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Stand on the hi-hat side. If you can hear the hi-hat and not the snare, he ain't hitting it hard enough. Tell him. Also, if you stand on the hi-hat side and are for what ever reason, having trouble hearing the kick, you can put you foot on the floor spike of the kick drum and feel it through your foot. That little trick has saved my groove more than once.
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I'm with Wally on this one, I like to be able to

look to my left to see both the drummer and guitar player, seems more natural than looking

back over my right shoulder ( maybe it's a left handed thing - although I play righty!), I do have our Keyboard player to my right side.

So we're setup left to right from the stage like this, Guitar player/lead vocal, drummer, bass/bk vocal, keys/ bk vocal.

This works for us............

 

Rock On !

:thu:

I'm Todbass62 on MySpace
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Depends on what kind of music you play. For Rock/Pop gigs I usually set-up on the high hat side. But, I've set up on both sides before, and it's not really a huge difference. For Jazz, I always set up by the ride cymbal.
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Originally posted by tarsia:

I'm with Wally on this one, I like to be able to

look to my left to see both the drummer and guitar player, seems more natural than looking

back over my right shoulder ( maybe it's a left handed thing - although I play righty!), I do have our Keyboard player to my right side.

So we're setup left to right from the stage like this, Guitar player/lead vocal, drummer, bass/bk vocal, keys/ bk vocal.

This works for us............

 

Rock On !

:thu:

I'm a lefty, playing righty as well.

 

Wally

I have basses to play, places to be and good music to make!
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Originally posted by jeremyc:

At Mr. Capasso's request, I've moved my answer here (and edited it a bit).

 

There are a lot of benefits to standing on the high hat side.

 

1)The drummer is slightly turned in that direction--to his left. (his right foot is facing forward and is left foot is at a slight angle). If you are right handed you are facing slightly to the right. If you are standing on the drummer's left, it is easier for the two of you to have eye contact without either of you having to turn.

 

2)The tom tom is not in the way and you can actually see his right foot. That way sometimes you can tell what he is playing by watching even if you can't tell by listening.

 

3)The drummer is actually keeping time on the high hat, so it's a good thing to be able to hear it well.

 

4)As someone else said, your bass neck will be facing away from the cymbals, so you are less likely to hit them.

 

Slightly OT aside for those of you running all over the place with your wireless.

 

The speed of sound is approx. 1100 feet per second. (This changes with temperature and humidity). For quick calculations, I'm rounding it off to 1000. This means that if you are 50 feet from the drummer, it will take the sound .05 seconds to reach you.

 

At a tempo of quarter note = 120, a sixteenth note is .125 seconds long.

 

For me, being .05 seconds off due to the time delay is an unacceptable error.

 

Stand by your drummer! (apologies to Tammy Wynette).

Great post Jeremy, definitely one worth printing out. Cheers
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At church I play on the tom side so I can see my left hand, the piano's left hand, the drummer, and the guitarist's chords all at once...I can also see the words on the overhead with a slight turn (this helps me to tell people what verse we're up to etc) I look to my right for the music. Someone else said something about the high hat and the guitar?

 

For my band practice I sit next to the high hat so I can talk to the drummer...we play simple songs (which you can check out at mp3.com.au...we're inking)

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Our drummer liked to be close to my amp so we could lock better. We found the HiHat side to be the best because, as Jeremy stated, he was turned that direction. We also had line of sight with each other which helps on songs with lots of tempo changes. Also, my tuners were out of danger. Playing the ride cymbal with your bass neck doesn't work very well.

- Jon

-----

You have the right to remain in the groove, any solos cannot be used against you, you have the right to snap and pop, if you cannot snap and pop, two fingers can provide the funk just fine.

 

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I'm glad I asked this question! I'm learning that there is a lot to consider!

 

I think one of the problems is that, since the dummer was new he was kind of timid and wasn't drumming loud enough, especially on the snare. I'm going to talk to him about that before I make a decision. Temporarily I will be on the high-hat side.

 

But, of course I am interested in hearing more input on this.

HypnoBassMan

 

The deeper you go the better you feel! (True for bass and hypnosis.)

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Although my preference is to be on the hi-hat side of the drum kit, I've been all over the stage, sometimes no where near the drummer. Then I just prayed that the monitor system was up to snuff. Since I started using IEM's most of the time a few years back that's not much of an issue anymore, but it's still nice to be able to see what the drummer's feet and hands are doing.
Later..................
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I jammed with some friends of mine last night and I purposely set up on the hat side because I have never played with this drummer before. I wasn't looking at his feet or hands, I was listening to the beat but looking him in the eye. Of course, it was easier for the eye contact playing on the hat side. However, I think it is less important on an established gig where you know the songs back and forth because you're not dependant on the beat because you know where it is and all you have to do is listen and anticipate. I know I don't stare at the drummer's foot for an entire gig, especially when I know the songs. I rely on feel and adjust accordingly.
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I have always played on the drummer's left, hi-hat side. It has always provided me the opportunity to see best what the drummer is doing, hear the drummer and myself together, and lock in.

Jeremy C definitely offered the cogent, cohesive, and complete answer. As often happens. :)

 

Peace,

 

wraub

 

I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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I had another practice session last night and I hung around on the high-hat side keeping everything that I've heard so far in mind. It worked out real well. I think I can get used to it since there are some good reasons to give it a try.

 

Thanks for the input!

HypnoBassMan

 

The deeper you go the better you feel! (True for bass and hypnosis.)

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i have done both and it doesn't really matter to me. i don't really lock in with the drummer more than with the guitar player, anyway.

 

my preference is to use a crescent band set up. i guess a lot of jam bands use it to make eye contact on stage. an old band i was in used it because we were a three-piece, so we didn't feel balanced, and we made so much eye contact during rehearsals, we didn't want to try to play without it. so we set up with the drums on stage right, the bass/vocals in the center, set back, and the guitar on stage left. i worked out really well. if i ever have a choice in the matter, that's how i want to play.

 

robb.

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