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Do you know the words to the songs?


jeremy c

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For my dad's band, I know enough, as the lyrics clue me in on certain chord changes, and what lines to play.

 

Back in the day, for the thrasher stuff, well, I didn't pay attention that much to be honest, but that doesn't mean I didn't try to learn the lyrics in advance. I might have been asked to "growl" something. :)

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Without doubt! I love reading the words to my favourite songs and as I write most of the words for the original band I play in I know them too.

 

Most musicians I know, who play no part in either the lyric writing or the vocals couldn't really give a damn what's being sung.

 

Horses for courses and all that!

 

Cup

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Very few.

 

I've never been a lyrics guy. Has nothing to do with liking them or not... I just don't hear the voice as anything but a melody unless I actively try to pick out the words. The exceptions to this are repetitive lines or focused words, such as a chorus or the like.

 

-Mike

...simply stating.
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while i'm usually the author/singer, i'm multi-tracking and not generating the lyrics until the bassline has been created.

 

i used to know virtually every note plant sang in all of the zepellin discs but rarely bothered to know what the actual words were, had fun bouncing around both the vocals and the bass parts the most in listening to them.

 

if i was performing bass, then i would probably take the trouble to actually know them for the performance itself.

--_ ______________ _

"Self-awareness is the key to your upheaval from mediocrity."

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Oh now Jeremy!

 

You and I both know that there are no words to most jazz tunes...at least not good lyrics.

 

I couldn't vote, no category seemed to fit what I do.

 

So I'll just comment. I am aware of the lyrics to most of the songs I play...but I don't sing the song in my head.

 

Lyrics are important to me for 2 reasons. 1. Sometimes I'm reading a piano score with lots of DC, repeat, coda stuff. Lyrics are really helpful to assure me that I'm in the right place (exactly the way a conductor cues an orchestra section) 2. Lyrics deliver emotional content. For that reason, I like to know them...I alter my bass line to augment the emotion:

 

A cliche, but good example: "Lord I Life Your Name On High," at the end, when that lyric is sung, I might do an octave slide. Yeah, cliche, but it works.

 

As far as lyrics go, my head spins with them. I could probably write most of the lyric to over 500 songs...maybe more. But I don't play that kinda music too often.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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There isn't a choice for knowing SOME of the lyrics to MOST of the songs!! lol :D

 

I put I know the all lyrics to most of the songs I play

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Originally posted by Dr. Phil-6006:

There isn't a choice for knowing SOME of the lyrics to MOST of the songs!! lol :D

Ditto!

 

The only songs I usually know all of the lyrics to are the ones that I have to sing.

 

I put, "I know the lyrics to some of the songs I play."

 

Actually, come to think of it, I really know SOME of the lyrics to ALL of the songs I play.

 

... connie z

"Change comes from within." - Jeremy Cohen

 

The definition of LUCK: When Preparation meets Opportunity!

 

http://www.cybergumbo.com

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I know most of the lyrics even if I don't have vocal duty. I like to know what the songs are about in general at the very least.

 

I don't want to perform a song about dead puppies or anything horrible like that...

Double Posting since March 2002

Random Post Generator #26797

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Yeah, since I'm the lead singer in my band, I pretty much have to know all the words. Of course, that doesn't mean that I don't keep a notebook full of all the lyrics on a music stand beside me on the stage...
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The prog rock band is currently learning all new material for an album, and I'm busy enough with learning the demanding bass parts that I haven't worried about the lyrics. I do have a copy of the lyrics, though, which I requested to get a better feel of the emotion behind the songs.

 

For our covers (which are currently only Tom Sawyer and Dust in the Wind) I know nearly all of the words, enough to mouth along and help get the audience involved.

 

In other, more cover-oriented bands, I know most of the words to the songs.

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Originally posted by Rik:

Yeah, since I'm the lead singer in my band, I pretty much have to know all the words. Of course, that doesn't mean that I don't keep a notebook full of all the lyrics on a music stand beside me on the stage...

I'm with ya on this one, Rik. If I have the lyrics there, I don't need 'em. If they're not there...amnesia. :eek:

 

"I have the heart of a young boy. I keep it in a jar on my desk..."

-Tim from Jersey :thu:

Play. Just play.
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The thing that amazes me is that if you ask me to sing a song I know (not one I'm singing lead on in my band), I might well forget most of the words. But put the recording on, and I'm on top of it!! Must be the way my memory works (or doesn't work...).

 

I don't always think about what the words mean - some songs are too deep or strange or outside my experience to grasp. For example, my guitarist loves Hendrix lyrics and finds them meaningful. I find them to be psychedelic ramblings. I like psychedelic ramblings (for you older folk, I love Traffic's "Hole In My Shoe" from the Dear Mr. Fantasy album), but it doesn't speak to me. But I do love well done lyrics, or lyrics with a twist (of story or of phrase). Elvis Costello never ceases to amaze me in this area.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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I do know alot of the lyrics to the songs I play but that took a lot of time. Generally speaking before I became serious about bass playing I wouldn't even listen to the lyrics and just play how I felt the bass line should be. Then I became aware that the lyrics are an essential part of the song. Most people in the world listen to lyrics! So now when writing a bass line to a new song I take a look at what the lyrics are trying to convey, then I write my bass line to incorporate the feel of the lyrics, and of course everything else that goes along with writing bass lines.
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I know all the lyrics to probably 95% of the songs that I know how to play. I know probably 90% of the lyrics to all the songs in my entire CD collection; which is currently a little over 700 CDs.

 

For whatever reason, I retain lyrics in my memory fairly easily. I use this to constantly annoy singers in cover bands. It rules.

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I don't know many lyrics to our songs. It's not that I don't want to or don't care, I just don't have a good memory for lyrics. I hear them when we play, I just don't remember them. I guess that's not the way I learn songs. I know the form, I can hum the melody, but that's about it.
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So now when writing a bass line to a new song I take a look at what the lyrics are trying to convey, then I write my bass line to incorporate the feel of the lyrics,
I did that with a song we do at my church. The song has a water theme: God, you have moved upon the waters.... So I came up with a very repetitious line that incoporates some sliding up and down to create the impression of a tide gently surging in and out.
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Whenever I get a new CD I listen to it once and then the second time through I pull out the jacket and read all the lyrics (and all the liner notes,I'm so anal).

 

I have usually known all the lyrics to the songs I performed but I do not sing and believe me, the world is a better place because of that! :rolleyes:

Nothing is as it seems but everything is exactly what it is - B. Banzai

 

Life is what happens while you are busy playing in bands.

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Originally posted by basshappi:

[QB]Whenever I get a new CD I listen to it once and then the second time through I pull out the jacket and read all the lyrics (and all the liner notes,I'm so anal).

 

Basshappi, I usually can't even wait to get the c.d home. I read the words and the linear notes on the bus home.

 

Sometimes this can be a bad thing as lazy lyrics sometimes put me off the record.

 

Cup

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Aside from the more obvious cues to go to the next section, lyrics can offer insight to phrases. Especially jazz tunes. Sometimes the lyrics are so lame that it cool disregard them altogether, considering only melody, rhythm and harmony
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Originally posted by ibescotty:

I don't want to perform a song about dead puppies or anything horrible like that...

Or anything that Cannibal Corpse or the like plays/sings about. Take a look at their lyrics (yes they are actual words) and you'll see what I mean. No I don't listen to them, and yes I would like to shoot the "grunter/screamer" (vocalist)
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Originally posted by davebrownbass:

You and I both know that there are no words to most jazz tunes...at least not good lyrics.

Wow, for the first time I time I have found myself in disagreement with the honorable Mr. DBB.

 

I know you said "most" jazz tunes, but there are some shining stars out there:

 

Cheek to Cheek

Surrey with a Fringe on Top

They Can't Take That Away from Me

Volare

Take the 'A' Train

Summertime

Autumn in New York

Let's Call the Whole Thing Off

Paper Moon

Too Close for Comfort

The Girl from Ipanema

Summer Song

any Sinatra tune

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In response to Dave,

 

Thanks to Eddie Jefferson, Oscar Brown, jr. and Mark Murphy, many of the great instrumentals now have very memorable lyrics.

 

(Singing a few bars of Dat Dere)

 

Hey daddy, what's that there?

And what's that doing there?

Hey daddy, up here! Daddy, hey look at that over there!

And what's that doing there?

And where're they going there?

And daddy can I have that big elephant over there?

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Well, I was just a bit tongue in cheek, I think.

 

What I am really not a fan of are the "forced" lyrics to jazz standards.

 

But (as was mentioned above) Jobim tunes especially have nice words. And some of the tunes listed above I would classify as "show" tunes which have become jazz standards...and many are indeed good.

 

The first jazz tune I ever really liked was Paul Anka's "Autumn Leaves" from some album in the early sixties. And he sang it.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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I know the words to most of the songs that I play/have played. I'm usually able to memorize things musical pretty quickly and retain them. As has been mentioned before, I find it helpful for cues to different movements, dynamics, etc. I'm also a vocalist and writer, so it's natural for me to know them, I suppose. In a pinch I could probably play most of the guitar/key/drum parts also, for the same reasons mentioned above.
Later..................
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Originally posted by davebrownbass:

The first jazz tune I ever really liked was Paul Anka's "Autumn Leaves" from some album in the early sixties. And he sang it.

Hey, Autumn Leaves was one of my first favorites as well! The first time I ever heard it was a version that Stan Getz performed (I wonder who was on bass on the recorded tune, it was an electric).

 

Then, I heard Joe Pass's version. WOW!

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