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Influences


mattski_dup1

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don't just try to broaden your "technical" horizon. you must learn how to groove. listen to motown -- james jamerson and bob babbit can lay down groove better than any i've ever heard.

 

also, if you want to become a better bassist, listen to the drums on the red hot chili peppers' album, "blood sugar sex magik". chad smith has a lot to say about groove on that record, and if you can play along to that, you know how to groove.

 

robb.

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Ditch the chop-orientation and think more about music.

 

Yes, that's great that you can play 4,000 notes a minute. That doesn't mean that you should.

 

Mingus wouldn't be a bad choice to give a listen.

 

Robert DeLeo is my favorite in the "rock" genre nowadays.

 

Sebastian Steinberg of the now defunct Soul Coughing does a lot with a little.

 

Just a few.

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Alain Caron. (solo or old stuff he did with UZEB).

 

He surely is one of the greateast bass player alive, and when it comes to jazz oriented or fusion music, you will not find a better combination of virtuosity and musicality on bass.

 

Check him out.

I insist.

:D

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Originally posted by Bumpcity:

My biggest musical influence is good potato salad, with lot's of mustard.

Can you be more specific? I have noticed that potato salad varies greatly from region to region. There is a heavy dose of German potato salad in some part of New Jersey, yet a variety with egg and carrots can be found at the New Jersey Shore. In Manhattan, the culinary landscape is dominated by straight up mayonNaise laced potatoes, with a heavy peppering of cracked black pepper.

 

:D

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Bump, before your next gig you should hit Werner's on the Ave. German potato salad so good it should be illegal. (I hope they're still there...)

 

(Yeah, I know you were just joking...but when someone in Seattle mentions potato salad...mmm.)

 

I'll second Jamerson. Groove defined.

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Bass influences?

 

Early on, probably John Paul Jones, Roger Waters, and Mike Mills since I played a lot of Led Zep, Pink Floyd, and REM covers in high school.

 

Then I'd probably add Jaco Pastorius -- not for some of the blazing stuff, but really for some of the lint-like in-the-pocket playing. And everyone who played bass w/ James Brown (like BOOTSY, baby!), since I'm willing to play the basslines from JB tunes till the cows come home and then some. I'll also add Sting. And Larry Graham, from whom I learned that slap isn't about machine-gunning notes out of the bass, but about feel and timing.

 

Currently I'm getting a lot from Paul Jackson (Herbie Hancock/Head Hunters) and Juan Nelson (Ben Harper and the Innocent Criminals).

 

I could go on and on. But I won't. I'd rather go eat a bologna sandwich on white bread.

 

Peace.

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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Getting an influence comes form many different things from a musicain or your next door nieghbor but your looking for a bass influence, well listen to the guys on this forum we are all an musical influence to anybody who uses us as one, but try bassist such ass Marcus Miller,Stu Hamm dave larue,victor bailey you'll love them if you like stanley clarke and victor wooten,but remember an influence comes from everything and use that to its best ability,it will help you.
Pete Combs...
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By technical horizons, i dont mean that i wanna be able to play crazy fast all the time. i mean more like innovative techniques, and original melodic interperetation. chops to me doesnt necessarily mean virtuosity (sp?), but just personal ability INCLUDING feel. im all for being able to blaze, but that doesnt mean i wanna do it all the time. thanx for the ideas guys.
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Originally posted by getz76:

Originally posted by Bumpcity:

My biggest musical influence is good potato salad, with lot's of mustard.

Can you be more specific? I have noticed that potato salad varies greatly from region to region. There is a heavy dose of German potato salad in some part of New Jersey, yet a variety with egg and carrots can be found at the New Jersey Shore. In Manhattan, the culinary landscape is dominated by straight up mayonNaise laced potatoes, with a heavy peppering of cracked black pepper.

 

:D

He did say with LOTS of mustard...

 

ISN'T THAT SPECIFIC ENOUGH FOR YOU!??! :D

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Well, my seminal influences (even if I didn't know all their names) were:

 

Jamerson. Then, Chuck Rainey (the Sanford and Son bass line was the first one I ever identified as "cool" and attributed to bass). John Entwhistle. Paul McCartney. Lee Sklar. Larry Knechtel (Bread...used a pick). Pete Cetera (Chicago) Billy Talbot (Crazy Horse). Tim Drummond. Duck Dunn. Roger Waters.

 

Notice...lot of pop stuff there...in HS. Then:

 

Jaco Pastorius.

 

And I quit playing electric bass for a few years.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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ALL-CANADIAN POTATO SALAD

here this should help....try listening to Charles Mingus and Nina Simon when preparing the salad.

 

2 1/2 pounds medium boiling potatoes (white, red, or fingerling)

3 tablespoons cider vinegar, or to taste

5 hard-boiled large eggs

1 cup mayonnaise

2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

1/2 cup chopped sweet onion

3 large celery

1/4 cup chopped dill pickle

Salt and pepper

Chopped parsley or scallions, for garnish

 

Boil potatoes: In a large saucepan cover potatoes with salted cold water by 1-inch and simmer, covered, until just tender, about 15 to 30 minutes, depending on size of potatoes. In a colander drain potatoes and cool to warm.

With a sharp knife peel warm potatoes and cut into 1/3-inch-thick slices. In a bowl, immediately toss potatoes with vinegar.

 

In a separate bowl, mash yolks, (reserving whites) and stir in mayonnaise, mustard, and onion. Chop whites (egg) and celery and gently toss together with dill pickle and potatoes, mayonnaise mixture, and salt and pepper, to taste. Garnish with chopped parsley or scallions. Serve potato salad chilled or at room temperature.

 

its so GOOOOOOOOD

It's not just GOOD

It's good ENOUGH!

Krusty Brand

Seal of Approval

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I was most inspired by these people (if anyone cares)

 

1. Geddy Lee of Rush

2. Joey DeMaio of ManOwar

3. Roger Waters of Pink Floyd

4. Flea of RHCP

 

and countless others came along after i started playing, but those are who inspired me to start

Im just a dreamer

 

Dreaming my life away

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At the risk of hijacking this thread I have been thinking about this subject for quite some time, but from a different angle. I know we all listen to famous players that inspire and teach us. However, I have been curious as to the individuals who personally had a direct influence on us.Kind of an opprotunity to give some limelight to our personal unsung heros. I'll demonstrate what I mean by giving you mine.

 

When I started playing bass I had been taking classical piano lessons for about two years. My teacher ,realizing my calling for the bass refered me to a fellow musician from the Lubbock Symphony Orchestra for lessons. His name was (is) Mike Roberson

 

Mike played double bass for the Lubbock and Amarillo Symphony Orchestras as well as the Texas Tech University Orchestra. He also played electric bass for the top jazz lab bands at the University and various ensambles around town. He taught at the university and privately.

 

Mike opened my 14 year old eyes to the world of Bass. He introduced me to Jaco and Stanley and made me realize that the bass is an instrument of great potential. That it deserved respect and commitment. He also taught me that the true challenge was to learn to play exactly what was needed and no more. He also taught me that there are only two kinds of music, Good music and Bad music and that if I kept an open mind I could learn valuable lessons from each. He inspired me to work toward thinking as a musician instead of just as a bassist.It would take pages to relate all he taught me and a lot of it I don't think I could adequately express in words.

 

I learned from him for about 2 years. Then he auditioned for the Joe Ely Band and went on tour with them for a number of years. I don't know what has become of Mike but I am forever grateful that he took me as his student. I would not be the musician I am today with out his influence.

 

So, that's my story...who's next?

Nothing is as it seems but everything is exactly what it is - B. Banzai

 

Life is what happens while you are busy playing in bands.

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