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bass cabinets


penny

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Welcome to the Lowdown, Penny.

 

A cabinet is a box with one or more speakers in it.

 

An amplifier actually has two parts, a preamplifier..which boosts the signal a little and can change the tone, and an amplifier which boosts the signal a lot.

 

Some people will say "my bass amp" when they are referring to what is called a combo amp...one box that includes a speaker an amp and a preamp.

 

The typical amp head includes a preamp and an amp.

 

As people get more hi-tech, sometimes they buy separate preamps and power amps and rack mount the whole thing.

 

I recommend getting a little practice sized combo amp to practice with at home and a big 'ole honkin' amp head and speaker cabinet to play in a band with.

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Yes.

 

To elaborate on Thomas' excellent answer, technically the cabinet is the box that houses the speaker(s) (a.k.a., driver(s)), and you plug the amp into the cabinet.

 

Combo amps have the amp, speaker, and cabinet as one tidy package.

 

Welcome! :wave:

 

Peace.

 

Damn you, Jeremy! Beat me to the punch again...and with a more complete response! ;)

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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I gave such a short answer because you "gentlemen" would have had 5 or 6 posts before I could finish pecking my way around the keyboard.

 

I have got to learn how to type.

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Thanks! You guys are dolls. Although I'm little lost as to why tnb is so against the lakers. I happen to live in L.A.! (i.e. where did that come from?!?!)

 

Anyway, I have a practice combo amp that's about 10 yrs old and isn't working right now, so I wanted to get the "lowdown" before I went searching for new equipment.

 

Any suggestions? I have a standard Fender Jazz that is just my baby.

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Welcome to the Lowdown Penny!

 

We'll need a bit more information before we can steer you towards some nice amps, as ultimately we can only give some suggestions and you have to make the final call based on your personal preferences...

 

First, what kind of usage is the new amp going to get? Practicing at home? Jamming with some friends? Playing in a small club? Big arena concerts? Recreating the Wall Of Sound?

 

Next we need to know what kind of budget you have reserved for the new amp? Would you consider buying it used?

 

With these questions we can start to narrow the field down a bit, and after that we can move on to more specific stuff like tonal variations and other possible features, bells and whistles...

 

-Pernax

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Some head units have headphones out so that you can buy a head now and use it for practice through headphones or a home stereo and then buy/build/borrow a cabinet when playing with others...btw does the combo you're (not) playing through at the moment have a line out or similar (i.e. is the power amp or speaker/cabinet or pre-amp broken; or just the power supply to the whole thing?)...then you could practice through your home stereo.
A man is not usually called upon to have an opinion of his own talents at all; he can very well go on improving them to the best of his ability without deciding on his own precise niche in the temple of Fame. -- C.S.Lewis
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Hi Penny, welcome aboard! :wave: There have been many past discussions on this topic especially concerning 'combos'. Try using the 'search' function in the top right hand corner. You will get a bunch of info real fast that way. But as the others have said, tell us more about yourself and we'll be able to be more helpful.

 

Cheers :thu:

Nothing is as it seems but everything is exactly what it is - B. Banzai

 

Life is what happens while you are busy playing in bands.

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It's just for practicing at home. I'm not in a band - I could never really be a musician, if only for sheer lack of talent. Budgetwise, I'd like to keep it under $500 since it is just for practice, at least for the moment (but who knows what I'll be doing later, i.e. when they finally decide to toss me out of law school for being a lazy wise ass).

 

I was originally thinking of just getting another combo, but I'm intrigued by tom rivet's idea of just hooking an amp to my stereo.

 

I'm also curious about the Fender champs. My friend raves about them and the bassist and other guitarist in his band both have one. Why are they so revered?

 

P.S. Thanks for the warm welcome and all your advise.

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Originally posted by penny:

I happen to live in L.A.!

Thats why he said it...

 

Originally posted by penny:

where did that come from?!?!

Get Used to ti :D:wave:

 

Welcome to the Lowdown.

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You could also get a DI box and play that into your stereo...you just need something to get the signal up to line level and match impedance (well make the input impedance higher than the output for each stage). A POD or a v-amp (putting on flame proof suit :) ) would do the job and make your stereo sound more like a 'real amp'. Buying an OK pre-amp or DI box means you'll never be replacing it and its still cheap(ish) in the mean time. A combo would mean you didn't have to buy anything else if you start playing with others.
A man is not usually called upon to have an opinion of his own talents at all; he can very well go on improving them to the best of his ability without deciding on his own precise niche in the temple of Fame. -- C.S.Lewis
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i recommend against playing through your home stereo. i have a very nice home stereo with a power sub, and it just doesn't sound as "alive" as through a bass amp.

 

i think your first step should be to formulate a budget. after that, you can get suggestions and try a few, and them make a purchase. gear isn't as critical when you're new at playing. you may end up keeping for quite a while, so don't consider it a "throw-away" purchase. but you should realize that what you want now may not be what you want in a year.

 

robb.

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What robb. said...unless you just want a cheap way of hearing yourself and can accept that the home stereo is probably giving a clean version of your sound instead of doing all that nice distorting that people refer to as warmth etc.

 

Robb. does the home stereo sound different to DI into a flat PA?

 

The amp simulators, POD; v-amp; other?, try to change the sound so that it sounds like a certain amp playing through a certain speaker...this is all tone stuff that I think can wait till later but others may disagree.

 

My original suggestion was to check if your existing amp had a line level output, or a headphone out, so that you can still practice whilst deciding what to do.

A man is not usually called upon to have an opinion of his own talents at all; he can very well go on improving them to the best of his ability without deciding on his own precise niche in the temple of Fame. -- C.S.Lewis
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Here's my opinion on bass cabs... first off, go Ampeg. Second, 1x15 is better than a 1x10 or 1x12 speaker cab for bottom end reasons. To go bigger, I'd suggest 2x10's over 1x15. From there, 10's all the way. You really don't hear the entire instrument unless you have at least a 4x10 cabinet. But, by then you've blown the $500.00 budget on just a good cab. I like the punchiness of 10 inch speakers. Put them in multiples, and they add up to a full range sound 15's alone just can't create.
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Originally posted by tom rivet:

Robb. does the home stereo sound different to DI into a flat PA?

i was speaking more toward using a simulator through a home stereo. i have used my jstation through it before, and it just isn't as exciting, even when turned up a lot, as a bass amp. i don't feel like trying to find out why, but i'll bet the reason lies in why it's so hard to get a good sound when recording.

 

robb.

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Originally posted by robb.:

Originally posted by tom rivet:

Robb. does the home stereo sound different to DI into a flat PA?

i was speaking more toward using a simulator through a home stereo. i have used my jstation through it before, and it just isn't as exciting, even when turned up a lot, as a bass amp. i don't feel like trying to find out why, but i'll bet the reason lies in why it's so hard to get a good sound when recording.

 

robb.

I think a big part of it is that even good home stereos are more compressed than most live audio gear and are lacking in either true deep bass or enough midbass to give the impression of lots of air moving - they just don't sound big enough or dynamic enough. One of my tricks that helps with getting a good recorded tone has been to use a good compressor and a highpass filter set progressively higher depending on how busy the line is.

 

Alex

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this is slightly OT, or maybe a good bit, but i was wondering why PA speakers are so different than bass cabs. most of the PA speakers i know have the same, if not better, frequency range than a bass cab.

 

i cant comment on tone, cus i havent played a bass amp straight through a PA.

 

??

.~.
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Originally posted by penny:

rotosound45, "1x15 is better than a 1x10 or 1x12 speaker cab for bottom end reasons."

 

what do these measurements mean?

1x15 means one 15" speaker

1x10 means one 10" speaker

1x12 means one 12" speaker

2x10 means two 10" speakers

etc...

 

However, rotosound45's statement is bunk without knowing the make of cabinet. I'd put up my cabinet, which consists of two 10" speakers up again any production 15" cabinet for low end response.

 

Speaker size alone does not determine low end response. A speaker cabinet frequency response is determine by Theile-Small paratmeters (search the forum) and include not only speaker size, but it's response, the cabinet, and the cabinet build type (a sealed cabinet with no vents, verse one with one or more "ports").

 

You should really go to http://archive.bassplayer.com/gear/cabinet.shtml for a rather well written primer for bass cabinets.

 

Enjoy.

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Welcome Penny,

 

If you play only for yourself, you might also consider a Korg Pandora PX4B. It's not much bigger than a pack of cigarettes and offers alot of nice effects as well as alot of other nice features. Just plug in your headphones and crank it as much as you want, no one but you will hear it. It also has a line out so I presume you could use it in-line to an external speaker sometime in the future if you need to.

 

Just a thought from one novice to another.

Beware the lollipop of mediocrity; one lick and you suck forever.
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  • 1 year later...
Originally posted by getz76:

Originally posted by penny:

rotosound45, "1x15 is better than a 1x10 or 1x12 speaker cab for bottom end reasons."

 

what do these measurements mean?

1x15 means one 15" speaker

1x10 means one 10" speaker

1x12 means one 12" speaker

2x10 means two 10" speakers

etc...

 

However, rotosound45's statement is bunk without knowing the make of cabinet. I'd put up my cabinet, which consists of two 10" speakers up again any production 15" cabinet for low end response.

 

Speaker size alone does not determine low end response. A speaker cabinet frequency response is determine by Theile-Small paratmeters (search the forum) and include not only speaker size, but it's response, the cabinet, and the cabinet build type (a sealed cabinet with no vents, verse one with one or more "ports").

 

You should really go to http://archive.bassplayer.com/gear/cabinet.shtml for a rather well written primer for bass cabinets.

 

Enjoy.

LOL! Amazing what you dig up... Getz, if you read what I had posted, you would see I suggested 2x10's over a single 15" woofer. Better tone across the entire spectrum in terms of a stand-alone cab, in my opinion. Or maybe it's just more "bunk". Please, let me know.....
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Originally posted by rotosound45:

first off, go Ampeg.

 

Why? Just brand loyalty or is there a reason?

 

Originally posted by rotosound45:

Second, 1x15 is better than a 1x10 or 1x12 speaker cab for bottom end reasons.

 

Are you so sure? What has better low end response, an SWR Son of a Bertha (1x15") or an Accugroove Tri112 (1x12")? How about a SWR Son of a Bertha (1x15") or a SWR Goliath Jr. (2x10")?

 

Originally posted by rotosound45:

To go bigger, I'd suggest 2x10's over 1x15. From there, 10's all the way. You really don't hear the entire instrument unless you have at least a 4x10 cabinet.

 

Really? You can't hear the entire instrument with a 4x10" cabinet? Are you so sure? What do you miss when you go with just a 1x12" cabinet?

 

Originally posted by rotosound45:

I like the punchiness of 10 inch speakers. Put them in multiples, and they add up to a full range sound 15's alone just can't create.

So you're suggesting the glorious Ampeg SVT cabient:

 

http://www.ampeg.com/images/products/1SVT-810AVsmall.jpg

 

Has a more full range sound than the Bag End S15X-D:

 

http://www.bagend.com/bagend/images/s15x-d_sm.jpg

 

Your stereotyping suggests that:

 

Ampeg SVT210-HE = SWR Goliath Jr. = Eden 210 XLT = Acme Low B2 = Avatar B210

 

and

 

Ampeg SVT115 = SWR Son of a Bertha = Eden 115 XLT = Bag End S15X-D

 

All of those speakers are very different and have different responses. You suggest that a 1x15" is good for low end response, but out of the population above, the best low end response is from the Acme Low B2. You suggest that 2x10" designs are better for full range response, but the Bag End S15X-D holds its own again any of the 2x10" listed.

 

Woofer size and design is only a part of the equation for speaker response. Equally important are cabinet size, construction, crossover design, porting, and tweeter response.

 

Stereotyping cabinets based on woofer size is a mistake, especially these days when more and more manufacturers (Bergantino, Epifani, Acme, Accugroove, Euphonic Audio) are getting nice designs without using the old configurations.

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Hello Penny and welcome to the low down.

 

As you'll soon find out asking questions like this usually results in a flame war irrupting with comments like:

 

"You should do a search before asking stupid questions..."

 

Ect.

 

Now, with that out of the way (and I'm not a flamer by the way, you did well picking bass! ) A really good combo amp is great for practicing and such. If your just learning the bass i might add in a really cool tool to help you with your ear training and timing, and lifting bass lines from popular tunes. The Tascam CDBT1 Portable CD Bass Trainer. This little beauty will help you immensly, and its not just a tool for beginners. you will be lifting bass lines for you entire carreer on the bass, and you'll find this tool extremely useful and well worth the money.

 

Now i know u asked about cabinets, but as someone who wished they had one years ago when i started learning, it is a good suggestion.

Check out my work in progress.
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Penny:

 

Just in case you're interested, here's a cut-n-paste from another post of mine:

 

Right now, I'm leaning toward returning the BA-112 and keeping the BA-115. Btw, if anyone wants the BA-112, shoot me an email at davesisk@ipass.net. I'll be happy to let it go for what I have in it ($199 + tax, plus shipping cost unless you pick it up) rather than simply returning it.

 

A brand new Ampeg BA-112 for ~$200 is a steal...the normal street price is $379 or so...

 

L8r,

Dave

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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Originally posted by chewstermaniac:

Now, with that out of the way (and I'm not a flamer by the way, you did well picking bass! ) A really good combo amp is great for practicing and such. If your just learning the bass i might add in a really cool tool to help you with your ear training and timing, and lifting bass lines from popular tunes. The Tascam CDBT1 Portable CD Bass Trainer. This little beauty will help you immensly, and its not just a tool for beginners. you will be lifting bass lines for you entire carreer on the bass, and you'll find this tool extremely useful and well worth the money.

 

Now i know u asked about cabinets, but as someone who wished they had one years ago when i started learning, it is a good suggestion.

I second the recommendation on the Tascam CD-BT1 bass trainer! I have one and it's extremely useful.

 

Dave

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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