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L'shona tova tikatevu


jeremy c

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Originally posted by Tom Capasso:

HAPPY ROSH HASHANAH to all our Jewish friends!!!

 

Tom

especially in East Meadow! :D
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Services were inspiring.

Thanks to each of you for your reply to my thread.

You are a mensch! (You don't have to be Jewish to be a mensch).

 

Playing the music was interesting, to say the least. The room was enormous, with 500 people. The band was on one wall and the Rabbi who was leading the singing was in the center of the room.

 

There was a noticeable time delay between him and the band and also between the whole room as the congregation sang along. The 7 musicians were also spread out quite a bit and we had trouble hearing each other.

 

They had passed out tambourines to the congregants which made the drummer and me miserable.

 

Every time I thought I was managing to hold the whole thing together, someone would come up and say that the bass was too loud. Then I would turn down the volume and the time would drift apart again.

 

So much music, so little time. ;)

 

But it wasn't about the performance, it was about prayer and I had a spiritual experience (and helped other people to do the same). Many people came up to me afterward and thanked me for the music. I said it was my pleasure to play (which it was).

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Folks...

Let me sum up Rosh Hashanah for ya:

I leave work at 5pm. I pick up my 85-year-old, ailing aunt and uncle and drive them to my mother's house while they both clutch the seats, seatbelts and doorhandles in fear for their lives. It's clear that they think I'm driving too fast because I'm doing 35 mph in a 40mph zone.

 

We get to my mom's place. The assortment of old people there is frightening... There are more canes and walkers than at a medical supply warehouse. It takes roughly 45 minutes to get everyone around the dinner table because this one doesn't wanna sit next to that one (but will only tell me this in a LOUD whisper so as not to offend the other party). It's like a kindergarten class.

 

My uncle does the blessings and prayers... he has to repeat everything about 10 times because nobody can hear him... and everyone there SWEARS they don't need hearing aids.

 

My mom's food is awesome. In case you're wondering... chicken soup with matzo balls, garlic string beans, brisket, kugle, sweet potatoes, white potatoes and about 40 different cakes and pies (all made by my 80-year-old bubby.)

 

Lots of discussion regarding ailments, surgeries, politics and investments accompany the meal. On the plus side, most of my relatives no longer refer to my wife as "the shixsa." That's a nice change.

 

My aunt and uncle wanted to leave right after they had their coffee, so we kissed everyone goodbye (that took a half-hour) and rolled back to their suburban home, where they thanked my profusely and probably went to sleep immediately...

 

Then I went back to my parents' place and helped them clean up.

 

I finally got home around 1am. This was almost as much work as playing a show... but at least nobody screamed out "SLAYER!!!"

\m/

Erik

"To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting."

--Sun Tzu

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Could have been worse than tambourines, Jeremy.

 

Cowbells.

 

Sounds like you go to a reform temple. Mine is conservative congregation (I grew up in one that was leaned towards Orthodox). A huge one. For Yom Kippur, there will probably be around 2500 people...in one service! No instrumental music, just a cantor.

 

I don't know how he, or any other cantor, gets through a traditional Yom Kippur service. You're fasting from the night before, and singing a lengthy service while standing through nearly all of it. Our service starts at 8:30am, ends around 3pm (the cantor usually doesn't begin until mid-morning). Then starts again at 4pm and concludes with the end of the holiday around 7:45p. Yes, that's over 10 hours of prayer while abstaining from food and water from 6pm the night before.

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The services where I play music are at a Jewish Renewal congregation. Services on Rosh Hashonah went from 9 to 3. I snuck out a one point to get a cup of coffee.

 

Yom Kippur will probably go from 6:30 to 11 on Sunday night and then on Monday from 9 to 8 (with an hour break from 4 to 5). I'm a little worried about fasting...at least I will be seated. After one year when I dropped my bass with all the standing up and sitting down (and trying to play and turn pages in both the music book and the prayer book), I have decided to stay seated.

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I havent been to a synagogue in like 15 years. My dad had an issue with the fact that the local reform temple had a female Rabbi. Kind of sad really. She was very good from what I remember. So we did all of our celebrations in the home. I still do that now. Had a nice quiet dinner at home. My wife is not Jewish but she makes a mean Kugel. Traditionally Kugel is for Passover but its one of my favorites and I take any chance I can to get it!! I live pretty far away from my Mom but she usually makes it out for Passover and we have a big seder plate for everyone. Its usually a really cool event as we always have someone over who has never experienced a Passover dinner.

Double Posting since March 2002

Random Post Generator #26797

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Originally posted by dcr:

Originally posted by CMDN:

Folks...

On the plus side, most of my relatives no longer refer to my wife as "the shixsa." That's a nice change.

 

Oh, man, that killed me! I almost fell out of my chair laughing at that one... :D

Me too !!!

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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Originally posted by CMDN:

On the plus side, most of my relatives no longer refer to my wife as "the shixsa." That's a nice change.

I don't get it...that's probably cuz i don't know what a SHIXSA is.

 

Great story though Erik. Very funny. There should be a movie about it. :D

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Phil...

Shixsa is a Yiddish slang term for a non-Jewish girl. It's sorta derogatory... but not always.

 

Anyway, I think they DID make some movies about my family... Some guy named Neil Simon directed them.

\m/

Erik

"To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting."

--Sun Tzu

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