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calling all brass/trumpeters/NEW QUESTION


george costanza

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Following several attempts to pursue the question treated here, I wonder how unique these striations in LA's mouthpiece are.

Does anyone know of others who've done this?

 

In John Fordham's terrific, encyclopedic book on jazz [JAZZ, pub.1993] there are 2 striking photos.

One shows Louis Armstong playing a slide trumpet.

The other, a close-up of Armstrong's mouthpiece, shows several tiny grooves deliberately cut into the end, where his lips would be.

What effect would this have on his embouchure?

 

Any comments on either item would be helpful.

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where on the mouthpiece are the grooves cut? are they horizontal or vertical? do they cover the entire surface of the mouthpiece or just certain regions?

 

my best guess would be the grooves don't change his embouchure as much as his tone. his lips likely vibrated differently with the grooves than without, giving him a unique tone.

 

robb.

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Unfortunately I can't post the pic but looking at the mouthpiece straight-on, at the area where one's lips meet the instrument, there are about a dozen irregularly spaced slits that cross radially from the inside to the outside of the surface (that is, from the inside to the outside of the tube). They are not deep but the are definitely intentionally carved.

To me they look like they would hurt your lips!

 

I'm not a horn player but I recognize the vital importance of factors like breath pressure & embouchure on pitch as well as timbre.

Since these are not equally spaced, would Armstrong have to've always lined his mouthpiece up in the same position to get whatever advantage the provided?

 

& what about that slide trumpet---I've never even heard of one?!

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Originally posted by george costanza:

Unfortunately I can't post the pic but looking at the mouthpiece straight-on, at the area where one's lips meet the instrument, there are about a dozen irregularly spaced slits that cross radially from the inside to the outside of the surface (that is, from the inside to the outside of the tube). They are not deep but the are definitely intentionally carved.

To me they look like they would hurt your lips!

Depending on where they are, you might not even feel them so much. I had a mouthpiece that I used a LOT that had a few dings in it. The one place that I can think of that would really bother me would be a mark/scar/wound/scratch/monkey on the *inside* edge of the cup. That is the place that a lot of 'stuff' goes on between your lips and the mouthpiece. Very odd that it looks like he intentionally marked his up. I'd like to see a picture of that.

 

Originally posted by george costanza:

& what about that slide trumpet---I've never even heard of one?!

I've seen one played, never played one myself. Kinda the same idea as a trombone really.
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I know Louie puffed his cheeks out a lot, and when I do that while playing trumpet, it messes up my tone and sound A LOT. Maybe the grooves helped when he puffed?

 

No clue.

 

Maybe try doing a google search on "Louie Armstrong" search within results "Mouthpieces" maybe search within results "Ridged" or something that would describe what you are talking about.

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Interesting. Maynard Ferguson played a slide+valve trumpet of his own design. He called it The Firebird. He also had a slide+valve trombone that he called The Superbone.

 

Maynard used (uses?) Herco mouthpieces. Some Hercos have a ridge inside the cup of the mouthpiece. It's almost like having a smaller mouthpiece inside of a larger one. I don't know why they're designed that way.

The Black Knight always triumphs!

 

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Originally posted by Dan South:

Maynard used (uses?) Herco mouthpieces. Some Hercos have a ridge inside the cup of the mouthpiece. It's almost like having a smaller mouthpiece inside of a larger one. I don't know why they're designed that way.

These days, he's playing a Monette mouthpiece. It's a $200 mouthpiece! But $200 is "reasonable" when a Monette trumpet starts above $5000 and goes to $30,000+ for a decorated Raja Samadhi. Want to see a $30,000+ trumpet?http://www.monette.net/newsite/instruments_presentation.htm
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Originally posted by Mark Zeger:

These days, he's playing a Monette mouthpiece. It's a $200 mouthpiece! But $200 is "reasonable" when a Monette trumpet starts above $5000 and goes to $30,000+ for a decorated Raja Samadhi.

I used a Monette BL lead mouthpiece all through college. Basically like a Schilke 14a4a, but I played better in tune in the upper register with it. Go figure, it actually worked like it said it would. By 'upper register', I'm talking between the 'E' above the staff to double 'A or B' above the staff; which was the top of my register. Some days that double B just wasn't happenin.
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Originally posted by Bumpcity:

Originally posted by Mark Zeger:

These days, he's playing a Monette mouthpiece. It's a $200 mouthpiece! But $200 is "reasonable" when a Monette trumpet starts above $5000 and goes to $30,000+ for a decorated Raja Samadhi.

I used a Monette BL lead mouthpiece all through college. Basically like a Schilke 14a4a, but I played better in tune in the upper register with it. Go figure, it actually worked like it said it would. By 'upper register', I'm talking between the 'E' above the staff to double 'A or B' above the staff; which was the top of my register. Some days that double B just wasn't happenin.
You have big stones, Bump. :eek: I stayed out of the stratosphere. High 'E' was it for me.

 

After a 20 year hiatus, I started playing trumpet again 2 years ago when my daughter started playing in school.

 

I'm afraid to try a Monette mouthpiece because I might like it and have to buy it. Same reason I can pretty much forget about trying one of his 993 or 997 trumpets. There was one recently on eBay and the reserve wasn't met at $4000!

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I saw the German Brass when they can to UGA a while back and they did about 7 encores. One of then was "trombones take over the world" and not only is there a trombone, bass trombome, and trumpet trombome, but a trombone type slid instrument to substitute for almost every brass instrument!! The French horns were condemned to play the shaker so there was not one for them. Even picollo trumpet!

www.geocities.com/nk_bass/enter.html

 

Still working on it...

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In several responses to this query (which is posted on SSS & Keyb. forums, as well as here---check those for other interesting thoughts on LA's horn) I've read the term "piccolo trumpet"---are these referenses to pocket trumpet?

The pocket trumpet looks small, I know, but has the same length of tubing & plays the same range as the standard trumpet.

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Originally posted by Mark Zeger:

High 'E' was it for me.

You're not talking about 4 space E are you? I assume you're talking about the E above the Staff?

 

I can only get a High D or E above the staff...sometimes...probably not anymore, since I haven't played trumpet since about May... :freak:

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Originally posted by phil6006:

Originally posted by Mark Zeger:

High 'E' was it for me.

You're not talking about 4 space E are you? I assume you're talking about the E above the Staff?

Yeah, the one 3 "lines" above the staff. That's not a really high range for lead players, but it's high enough for me, thank you. That was with a standard 7c mouthpiece. Back in high school, I tried one of those shallow cup Jet Tone mouthpieces, but it didn't help.
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