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What's your commitment?


JDL

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I haven't been posting much lately, but lowdown is my home.

Now that that's over...what is your level of commitment to bass? Are you in it to get through school, to support a band? Are you fully devoted, and consider it a "professional hobby"? Is it just a side instrument, or a thorn in your side?

 

Explain yourselves!

 

Peace.

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I think I'm a lot more commited to my bass then most people are. I take my bass a tad farther that "noodlin' and fartin''round everyday unlike a bunch of my other friends and their guitars. I would like to to say bass is a hobby, but I think it's more than that. A lot fo days I spend more time on my bass than on tv. I just hope I can get some bands together (blues band hasn't gotten together yet).
In Skynyrd We Trust
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Hey I don't want to be committed. I just wanna have some fun! It is really great when you I play some songs with my "band mates" and record it, then play it back and it sounds good.

 

I practice almost every day, but usually less than an hour. Frequency is more important than duration! I just don't want to feel bad when I get together with the band.

 

But we are talking about going to one of those open mike things and playing a few songs for whoever shows up. Kind of scary, kind of funj to think about.

HypnoBassMan

 

The deeper you go the better you feel! (True for bass and hypnosis.)

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It's been my main (more often than not ONLY) source of income for my entire adult life and my artistic inspiration since adolesence. Even though I'm playing guitar in the project I'm currently involved in, I still play my basses more than my guitars when I'm not onstage. As Jeremy said :thu: "It's my life".
Later..................
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Well..being Christian..Jesus is my life...

 

But bass is 2nd.

:D me too...well, bass may line up 3rd coz i STILL am in school but maybe in a few years it'll be no. 2.

If Jaco's bass sound farts, please forgive me for doing it always!

 

ONCE A LEVITE, ALWAYS A LEVITE.

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Level of commitment:

 

I've always wanted to be a competent bassist. There have been a few, highly productive times where I was obsessed...

 

And now, I still practice a lot, but not everyday. And I'm not in a "spurt" mode right now.

 

The gigs I play require more commitment to the music itself than to playing bass. In other words, to make the music work, the bass defines the sound, the style. Gives the other musicians a canvas upon which they paint.

 

Aside from the spiritual commitments I have to God and family, my strongest desire is to be a fine teacher and conductor. I really struggle, use high concentration, beads of sweat...all that stuff...to come up with the exact analogy, the perfect illustration...

 

To find something to say to trigger self-exploration in my students.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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Not committed to bass at all. I am committed to MUSIC, and in the past that has caused me to play bass in a few bands. I just love to play any instrument that will allow me to contribute to making the music happen. Right now it's mostly keyboards, but you never know - I could end up playing bass in a band again so I come to this Forum to kinda stay in touch, to learn, and to share stuff others may perhaps learn from.

I used to think I was Libertarian. Until I saw their platform; now I know I'm no more Libertarian than I am RepubliCrat or neoCON or Liberal or Socialist.

 

This ain't no track meet; this is football.

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I am not a professional bass player, and I have no plan of becoming one.I have a family - which is my life. And I have a (good) job to provide for this family.

However, I would say that playing bass is somewhere at the center of my whole life. In fact, it is not about bass itself, it is about music ;) . Music has always been my main non-professional interest ( I buy records more than anything else, I am a very committed music listener, I read about music and musicians, etc.) and it will always be. For me, studying and playing bass is a privileged way to access music in general, to understand it and to develop my tastes and musical culture. It allows me to have a more rich and significant @rapport@ with music.

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Just like coyote. I love the bass, but I'm playing keys now. I'll never not play the bass, but I'll never not play music. As has been said before, it's my life.
**Standard Disclaimer** Ya gotta watch da Ouizel, as he often posts complete and utter BS. In this case however, He just might be right. Eagles may soar, but Ouizels don't get sucked into jet engines.
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My commitment tends to be more than some of the other people in the group.

 

I own nice gear, I teach, and I try to play whenever I can, I practice. I don't think I have ever shown up to a gig unprepared. I know I do my share of the work as far as learning music, load in, load out, etc.

 

I am very committed and sometimes, I think I should be committed.

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Interesting thread. Wally, Jeremy, and 61Pbass mentioned that bass is it for them. That's fantastic, and I can imagine being able to do something you love to earn a living is a wonderful thing. It obviously takes a certain level of talent, but also a courage and dedication to "take the plunge" and become a player that is a cut above the masses.

 

I love the instrument and music in general. Right when I started college, I was gigging regularly, taking private lessons, and really becoming the player I am today. I still consider myself an "intermediate player" that can hang with most of the non-jazz cats I see gigging. At that point in my life, I had to make a decision; go for it (be a music major and really get it on) or keep it as a hobby and take the "safe" route. I didn't have the confidence in my abilities and telant to go for it, and I am pretty much a risk averse person, so I became a business major.

 

My day gig isn't something I would do if I didn't get paid for it. However, I do get paid for it, and it allows me to live pretty comfortably. Best of all, it allows me to continue to pursue music as my main hobby. My main worry was I would end up being a music major, and I'd be the starving musician type. While I would be doing something I love, I would be miserable because I was always broke. I grew up being broke, and I didn't look forward to continuing the tradition. :D

 

I guess if you have the confidence in your ability and the determination to do what is necessary to become a professional musician, that's a fantastic situation. I was a bit turned off myself due to a lack of confidence in my ability and seeing situations where, even with talent and determination, things didn't work out. Either way, I'm pretty happy with my choices.

 

Jeremy, Wally, what led to your decisions to pursue music professionally? Anyone else, DavidBrownBass or 61Pbass?

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Well..being an atheist..Satan is my life...

 

I still practice quite a bit, but not nearly as much as when I was in college. I'd like to think I'm a fairly competent player; that's what I strive to be anyways. Every once in a while I'll get really inspired and spend 3-4 hours a day practicing. That usually only lasts a week or so, then it's back to just practicing to learn whatever material I'm supposed to learn at the moment. I'm not a full time musician, I have a day job and such. I'd really like to be a full time musician, I'm just too much of a wuss to throw my high-paying day gig to the side and go for it. I've been wrestling with this a lot recently.

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I can almost say "What getz76 said" and mean it word for word, except I didn't gig so much at the beginning of college, but rather near the end and after I was done.

 

But I do have a well-paying, mostly unsatisfying day job that I would not be doing if I thought I could make a living off of playing music. I chose this route long ago because my loves in life, teaching and music, seemed to pose a far more difficult path to comfortable living than did my profession, computer programming. I'm not saying I'm a bad programmer; I'm quite good. But I don't enjoy it nearly as much as I do music or teaching (math and science and French and English and history and music and pretty much anything to a willing student).

 

I'm coming to a point in my playing where I could possibly make a career out of music. If I ever feel that I am close to that point, or an opportunity presents itself, I hope that I can muster the moxy to go for it. In the meantime, I'll serve The Man eight hours a day and stash away cash for a future day when the drive to try my hand at something else (music, hopefully) exceeds my fear of the unknown and I jump off that bridge.

 

In more practical and less theoretical terms, I'm involved in private bass lessons, play piano and sing at church, and play bass in a jazz class combo, a children's educational show (in development, first show next week), a classic rock/country/rock cover band (paying and gigging), a progressive rock band (rehearsing for 3rd album, gigging soon), and an "everything" band (rehearsing and gigging soon, maybe with recording in the future). This week alone, I'll have 6 practices with 4 different groups, for 2 to 3 hours each. I'd say that's "committed." :)

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Well, During my off time from school, I'd like to say I was pretty committed. I want to be the best bass player I can be. I'm striving to make playing the bass (and music) my career. It's just what seems to be the path for me. Things can change, and I may put the bass on the back burner, but I sure hope not, because playing the bass is the COOLEST!!!! :P

www.geocities.com/nk_bass/enter.html

 

Still working on it...

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I consider my bass playing as a goal, if that makes sense. Rather than just playing as a hobby or a bit of fun on the side, I prefer to think of it as my future, playing bass is where I plan to be. Is that a little to ambitious of me?
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Commitment? Well, on one hand I've been playing the thing for more than 30 years. On the other hand, it's become one of several things I do to hearn a living, and when one of those things takes up all my time, bass gets short shrift.

 

On the gripping hand, I'm thinking about starting another original music project so that I can play for the fun of it rather than just for the money.

 

It's so hard to make a decision...

Dave Martin

Java Jive Studio

Nashville, TN

www.javajivestudio.com

 

Cuppa Joe Records

www.cuppajoerecords.com

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I struggle with this all of the time...I am in school for music ed right now at good ole Alabama A&m in the heart of Huntsville, AL...I want to be a studio musician but I always have a nagging doubt about ability...I think maybe I should resign myself to the fact that I will probably just teach (nothing wrong with that but I can't see myself choreographing a marching band)...Then I think maybe I should just go into engineering and make a solid living...but then I remember I have a great supportive wife, I've got my ducks in a row, I've got a small amount of talent and a whole lot of "want to"....So what the hell, I'm gonna throw it up in the air and see what comes down...

 

I am in my second year as a music ed major right now...I play in three bands and though I don't make a ton of money, I enjoy myself at almost every gig...I'd say its working and I'll just keep going and seeing what happens...

We must accept the consequences of being ourselves-Sojourn of Arjuna

 

Music at www.moporoco.com/nick

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Originally posted by SplitNick:

I struggle with this all of the time...I am in school for music ed right now at good ole Alabama A&m in the heart of Huntsville, AL...I want to be a studio musician but I always have a nagging doubt about ability...I think maybe I should resign myself to the fact that I will probably just teach (nothing wrong with that but I can't see myself choreographing a marching band)...

..

Coupla comments:

 

First...becoming a full time paid musician (as in studio work) really requires more than just ability. You doubt ability, but if you take that as a given, you still have to be mobile (go where the jobs are), unfettered (have to be able to survive thin times without worrying about the family), and lucky (read comments by bassaddict, Dave Martin, Max Valentino and jeremyc about the role luck played in their careers even after their ability was a given.)

 

I found, when confronted by the same challenge, that I couldn't balance everything and still be the kind of provider my children needed.

 

Secondly, teaching can NOT be a "fall back" position. Kids deserve more than that; and you deserve better than that. It's teachers who teach as a "What else am I gonna do?" that get burned out.

 

Thirdly, there is much more to music ed that running a marching band. Now I know the band thing is big...in Texas it's even bigger. And it's about show, and money and football and culture and all that. And, a bit, about music.

 

Wanna bring music into music ed? Teach strings. Learn to play orchestral bass, study string methods. Give your whole heart to teaching.

 

And, trust me. You'll get your share of gigs, make a ton of music, and be happy. At least, it worked that way for me.

 

It's not surprising that you face this quandry. You got into music because you loved performing, and you loved music itself. Now you find yourself seeing that there is a whole lot of stuff in the teaching world that takes you away from music. Damn right!

 

And it will be up to you to keep the heart there.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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Originally posted by getz76:

Jeremy, Wally, what led to your decisions to pursue music professionally? Anyone else, DavidBrownBass or 61Pbass?

As for myself Maury, I can never remember wanting to do anything else. Both of my parents and both of my grandfathers were professional musicians (as a matter of fact my Dad is still gigging at 72 years young :thu: ) so I literally grew up backstage and onstage. My parents needed a bassist for their band when I was 12. I was handed a Fender Musicmaster and a Bassman 100, given some bassic :D instructions and told to woodshed. I was onstage a few weeks later and absolutely hooked. By the time I was 17 I had an "artist" gig and have never looked back.

 

It's been a bit of a bumpy road at times honestly, but I have been in the right place at the right time more than once in my career. I took time out (as far as full tilt touring goes) to raise a family in the middle, but music is all I have done for the most part and I've never had any regrets. It really is a blessing to be able to have a vocation that I truly love.

Later..................
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