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Recording live shows


57pbass

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I am considering the purchase of a Mini Disc player to record some of the live shows I play.

Do I need one mike or more?

The band consists of Guitar Hammond B 3 Bass Drums and vocals. If I find the sweet spot on stage I can use one mike.

Any suggestions on how to properly do this.

www.danielprine.com

 

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I'm in favor of finding the one sweet spot and keeping it simple. You'll be surprised how much separation you'll get with just one stereo mic.

 

When you involve multiple mics, you've got to mix it and then there's levels, multiple placements and phase cancellation to worry about. IMHO its really not worth it if all you're trying to do is listen back to your gig.

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OK here's my 2 cents. If your band is running through a really good PA, then all you need is one or two PZM mics.

 

Pressure Zone Mics hace some very very important qualities that help when doing the kind of recording you're talking about.

 

They are phase independant - the construction of the mic means that two mics anywhere in the room are always in phase. This is a VERY good thing!

The sweet spot is alot easier to find, and one good sounding mic never detracts from another good sounding mic whenyou mix them together.

 

You tape them to a wall - or any large flat surface, and that surface becomes a apart of the mic effectively improving it's ability to work - the surface it is attached to is part of its sounding board.

 

My advice would be one PZM stuck to the ceiling above the drums/bass and one out front above the audience in between the PA speakers.

 

Now you can mix the vols of the two tracks down, the one above the drums will catch the live drum sound, the other the sound of everything goingthrough the PA. This arrangement works great in small gigs. I've made some bloody amazing recordings like that. Then played with them on a PC for ages mastering them - the results can be stunning.

 

Hope this helps

 

Si

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51: though I agree with you about the PZMs being a viable choice for this application I disagree with your assessment about phase anomalies or lack of. PZMs (pressure zone microphone) because of thier design our relatively immune to room reflections but our still subject to phase problems caused by the time arrival differences, the same as any two other microphones.

"I never would have seen it, if I didn't already believe it" Unknown

http://www.SongCritic.com

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My wife uses a PZM mike to tape the singing lessons which she teaches.

 

It's hanging on the wall and works better than anything else we have ever tried.

 

I bought a Radio Shack PZM which looks identical to the Crown model at a fraction of the price. I'm pretty sure it is the same model.

 

Recording off the mixing board has never worked well in my opinion. In the room mix, the bass and drums are much louder than they are in the PA mix.

 

In most of the bands in which I play, only the voices are in the PA (and of course the bleed of everything else) and a PA recording sounds terrible.

 

I don't see how the sweet spot could ever be on stage, you'll be behind the PA. You've got to get your mike or mikes up in the air in front of the band, but not too far in front. And then of course you have to protect it from the audience.

 

If you are playing in a club, you could get in early and string something up from the ceiling above the dance floor...you should get a good idea of what the band is sounding like from there.

 

Of course a good live recording would involve a feed from the mixing board, another set of mikes and another mixing board.

 

But if you just want to hear "how the band sounds", put your discman on a table and record away. You will learn a lot by listening to those recordings.

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But if you just want to hear "how the band sounds", put your discman on a table and record away. You will learn a lot by listening to those recordings.

 

Thats pretty much my goal.... We are going into the studio around Jan / Feb and we just need a decent reference tape to refine some of the songs.

 

I will check out the PZM mikes. I own a Audio Technica stereo mike which works well....

Thanks :)

www.danielprine.com

 

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