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Active or Passive???


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I like passive basses better...mostly because they don't make my amp fart and overload (I have a cheap amp). Also, I am perfectly happy with the tone I can squeeze out of my basses with no extra batteries needed. The cheap amp is actually louder with passive pups than with active...go figure.
Well, I see greenboy is back, so why the heck not....
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I like both... On my passive basses I only use the volume pots.

On my active bass I only use the setting I like best, but I'm gonna have to test other settings...

So I would prefer active basses with a passive switch so you have both worlds.

 

By the way, as far as I know the Warwick Corvette Standard is equipped with active 2-way electronics with a stacked pot...

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I´d say passive on the same basis as YEM... Furthermore, I think that I can get my tone through the amp. And I do have both a passive and a active. :cool:
Lol, my other user (wich I no longer can use) had 27 figures in the name... It was possible to register, but not to login! (MasteroftheGfifthfretDstring btw)
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Originally posted by Pol-Dee:

By the way, as far as I know the Warwick Corvette Standard is equipped with active 2-way electronics with a stacked pot...

Actually, Warwick does make a passive version. And I've been finding out that the passive version is almost just as popular as their active/passive version. (I've been reading "customer" reviews and it seems there are the same amount of reviews for both).
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Originally posted by YEM:

The cheap amp is actually louder with passive pups than with active...go figure.

Just a point of clarification -- passive/active pickups are difference from passive/active preamps. Usually when people talk about a bass being "active," they mean it has an active on-board preamp.

 

I like both active and passive basses. Both my basses happen to be active, but one has a passive option. Having the passive option is nice for two reasons: if my battery dies I will still have sound from my bass that I can control somewhat and I have more tonal options (e.g., I think that there is something a little more "natural" sounding to my bass when it's in passive mode). Active mode gives me more strength of signal and greater EQ options from the bass (although I try to take care of as much of my EQ as possible at the amp, and just tweak from the bass).

 

I agree that having active electronics with a passive option is perhaps the nicest set-up :thu: , which is the option I have w/ the Bartolini preamp in my Carvin. It's also possible with the J-Retro preamp, or the F Bass EQ, or... :)

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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I'm getting a new amp/preamp combo, so these opinions may change in the near future.

 

I love my active basses. I have two Peavey Cirrus basses with active preamps, an Ashbory (active), and an old Yamaha Attitude (passive). I play the Peaveys for about 98% of what I do, reserving the Yamaha for dirty bar gigs and the Ashbory for...well, I haven't found a band yet where I liked the sound of it or they liked the sound of it, so it mostly stays home.

 

I love having the EQ right there on the bass. Generally, I leave the Bass knob set about the same, and use the Mid and Treble knobs and the Pickup Blend knob to roll out whatever sound I want. I can go from smooth, booming bass to gritty, in-yer-face slap with a quick roll of the hand.

 

The biggest drawback is what I call "Battery Fright." I always have a pair of 9-volts handy, but there's always the fear that one day, I'll forget them, or give one to another unprepared musician and forget to replace it in the gig bag and be SOL when my time comes.

 

That being said, I can still generally get the sounds I want out of my passive Yamaha, though admittedly I require it to give me a more narrow range of sounds.

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I've been using both options for quite some time and i prefer each for specific reasons...

i go for passive when i play with just basically a drummer and guitarist but ...

i usually go for active when i'm in the middle of more-than-the-usual group with over a lot of frequencies being covered coz just like they said actives give you more eq versatility than passives...well, for me, the only way you could change the over all sound of your bass when playing passive (aside from your pots) is when you move your picking hand in different positions...now that's something very subtle when playing thru actives...

but hey, i love the sound of both, passives have a wider freguency range than actives while the latter has more power...

now the only way i get the best of both worlds is just like what the other guy said - install a preamp!

If Jaco's bass sound farts, please forgive me for doing it always!

 

ONCE A LEVITE, ALWAYS A LEVITE.

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I primarily use active, but when the occasion is suitable for a passive bass, there's nothing like it. So my P-bass still sees action.

 

A few designs combine the best of both worlds. It's really cool to have a passive tone knob in addition to an active buffering EQ you can switch in & out. I used to have an Ibanez Musician that was wired that way -- it was probably the most versatile instrument I've ever owned. I know Sadowsky also offers a passive tone knob as an extra optional add-on. Great idea -- wouldn't be that hard to do yourself (or get the tech to).

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I just prefer passive these days. Less crap to go wrong, and my 'tonal variance' needs are minimal. Tone control to make it bassy, or trebly to cut thru if needed. However, I took the time to test different capacitor/pot combinations to give me a wider, more even tonal adjustment for my tone control. Before I did that, I would turn the tone control and it would change from bass to treble immediately. Now, there's a smoother transition.

 

The biggest drawback is what I call "Battery Fright." I always have a pair of 9-volts handy, but there's always the fear that one day, I'll forget them, or give one to another unprepared musician and forget to replace it in the gig bag and be SOL when my time comes.

I have an active bass, which I haven't used in years, but I routed out another battery cavity and wired in a switch to select between the two battery sources. The preamp needs 18 volts, so there are four batteries in that bass. Either one set, or the other, is being used. The pickups would not work passive (this is an old bass), so at the time it seemed very critical to add a standby battery pack.
Bassplayers aren't paid to play fast, they're paid to listen fast.
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Well, I really don't know what most of you are saying, but all I'm saying is that I can get just about any sound I want from my passive Peavey than I could when I had an active bass (forget the make). I could turn the tone knobs all the way up and still get a bassy sound...I could also turn them all the way down and get a snappy sound. It's all in the attack, really... ;)
Well, I see greenboy is back, so why the heck not....
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bypassible active. this way i get the control and variance from my actives with the tried and true tone of passive as a backup. plus if your battery farts out or your pre is too hot for whatever you're running it through you can get past it.
Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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I have one of each. Active 1994 Fender P-Bass, and early 80s passive Yamaha BB300, which is essentially a P-Bass, but with the split P pickup in reverse.

 

I like them both. I've got DR Hibeams on the BB, and Rotosound Swing Bass strings on the Fender. The BB sounds punchy, yet still maintains the passive quality. With the Rotos on the Fender, I get the bass to sound warmer, though it still has enough punch and clarity for funk and metal styles.

 

I'm considering getting an OLP MM 5 string next, and it's passive. If I do get one, I'm 50/50 on getting it upgraded, because it sounds so good to me as it is. Just needs beefier strings than what's installed in the factory, especially the low B. I could just boost it by adding some dedicated patches on my BP200 multiFX pedal. That would yield some active like sounds without a mod.

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I play passive basses through a modern amp. I've had a couple of active basses in the past, and I also suffered from "battery fright", so I decided passive is the way to go... and for my buck, nothing sounds better than a good old "P"!

"Start listening to music!".

-Jeremy C

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I've used an active bass for the last 9 years, its got active pickups but passive tone. I seem to be the opposite to most as I feel no amount of onboard eq running at 9 volts can compare with the filters in a good pre-amp eq running at mains level.

 

In fact I never touch the tone control on the bass, just use different techniques to get whatever sound I like, (I do a mean upright rendition, to the horror of some jazz purists I know :) . I do change the pickup volumes though.

 

I like active pickups due to the longer leads I can use without losing tone and the ability to plug into more stuff directly (I've done alot of playing into PCs for people after a bit of real bass) without the tone suffering too much. Also, you can dial hi end out, but dialing it in tends to be very noise critical.

 

Hate the battery jitters though, my preamp on my rig failed recently, and I was so sure it was the battery (sods law, I didn't have one on me) that I went and got a fresh one, only to discover it was thepreamp.

 

Si

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