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fig

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I've just ordered my first set of TI strings, EB-345 Powerbass. With all the absolutely great stuff this forum, and other places, have said about the TI strings, I just had to!

 

Anyway, when I restring, I always put witness points on the strings breaking over the nut and bridge. As these strings are formulated and manufactured a bit different than others, is it OK to do this?

Bassplayers aren't paid to play fast, they're paid to listen fast.
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I've never done this to my strings, and I don't know about TIs specifically.

 

Try talking to Kevin at Connolly and Co (USA distributors). He's very helpful (he used to post here once in a while). He's easy to reach:

 

email: info@connollyandco.com

phone: 800-644-5268

support page (with link to their online forum) http://www.thomastik-infeld.com/support/index.html

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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Hi.

I am an avid TI user (an TI endorsee). Welcome to the fold! I am sure you will find TIs to be exceptional strings. They possess, IMHO, far greater tone and dynamics thanother strings...and they last and last and last......

 

Power Bass strings are a bit different. They are exceptional in their balance and have an incredibly hot output. This being said, setting a "witness point" may not be neccessary, but if this is your practice, I don't think it should make any difference.

 

PB's are not as light in tension as the Jazz Series strings from TI, or of course the Acoustic Bass strings which are of exceptioanlly light tension. I believe PBs have a higher tension than TI flats (which are the lightest tension flats around...and superb string to boot!), so the angle and pressure across the nut should be kept consistent.

 

Kevin is a great guy and easy to get a hold of...he even answers all of his e-mail.

 

For what it is worth, I use Acoustic Bass strings on many of my piezo driven basses, Jazz Rounds on my Godin BG4 and MTD, Jazz Flats on my 67 P bass, and PowerBass on Jack Casady and other Godin BG.

I thouroughly endorse these strings...they are head and shoulders above all others I have used, and I have used just about all of 'em!

Best thing is......they just get better the more you play them. I hardly ever have to change strings anymore (and I do play a lot!)

 

Max

...it's not the arrow, it's the Indian.
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Recently (2 months ago) I bought a fretless (Jazz/Moses) that had TI Jazz rounds on it.

 

So far, they've sounded great; though it's taking me some time to get used to the lower tension. It makes a real difference in how I can attack the strings, but the tone (and the lack of 'aging' seem to be worth it. Based on all of that, any kind of research/documentation might be futile...comparing apples to oranges.

 

JBFLA

Jim

Confirmed RoscoeHead

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Thanks for the input, guys. To tell you the truth, I'm almost giddy to try these strings, as all the info I've read indicates they really are a serious cut above all the other strings out there. (The 'search' function on this, and other forums is pure gold).

 

Repeatedly, the longevity of these strings, balance, and improvement of sound over time, have come up.

 

I chose the Powerbass as I'm playing mainly rock now, and I like a bit of tension (which I understand is about a medium tension, compared to other strings). Combined with the hotter output, due to the manufacturing process, I'm really looking forward to putting these on. I understand also there is alot less 'neck clatter' noise, too.

 

For those readers stumbling onto this post and might be wondering about the 'witness points' that I mentioned earlier, this may be good to learn.

 

As the fatter strings, notably the B and E strings, sit on the nut and bridge, the thickness of the strings causes them to gently arc over those components. What we want are the strings to immediately angle off the nut and bridge saddle.

 

So when you get the strings tuned to pitch, take your thumb and push down on the string just behind (fretboard side) the nut. Do this just forward (pickup side) of the bridge saddle. This takes away the gentle roll and provides a defined vibrating point at the point of contact on the bridge and nut.

 

What this does is:

--by doing this at the nut end, the first fret notes (B#, F, etc) are now as easy to play as any other note on the freboard. If you find fingering the first fret notes on your bass is a bit harder to do than any other note, put a witness point on those strings. You'll be amazed. Plus, the open notes get a little better sound and sustain.

 

--by doing this at the bridge end, you'll find sometimes intonation and note wavering problems disappear. More importantly, notes become a bit clearer, as that string now has a defined vibrating point on the bridge saddle.

 

I do this on all the strings, though honestly it doesn't seem to matter on the D and G strings as the natural tension pulls out any arcing over the bridge. Definitely do this on the B, E, and A strings. You may or may not actually see the arcing of the thicker strings over the bridge or nut. Do it anyway. You'll feel and hear a difference. Takes all of 2 seconds to make each witness point. Do it on one of your basses sitting around right now, or wait until a string change. You'll notice the string height will drop a small bit. If desired, readjust bridge height to taste.

Bassplayers aren't paid to play fast, they're paid to listen fast.
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fig,

 

Thanks for describing the "how to". I really find the "what it fixes" most interesting. I've wondered about "wavering" on my EB3 - maybe that was it.

 

Thanks

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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Originally posted by fig:

I've just ordered my first set of TI strings, EB-345 Powerbass. With all the absolutely great stuff this forum, and other places, have said about the TI strings, I just had to!

 

Anyway, when I restring, I always put witness points on the strings breaking over the nut and bridge. As these strings are formulated and manufactured a bit different than others, is it OK to do this?

I've been using TI PB's on my Sterling ( on all my MM basses )....and have never had to put witness points on any of the strings....

 

Great strings !!!

 

PJR

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You'll want to be gentle on your Thom's. The unique construction that makes them play and sound real cool also makes them unravel real easily. I tried using a Steinberger string adaptor on a set once and they all slipped out and were ruined in 30 seconds. (So I got about a buck a second... crap.)

 

I still love 'em, though! Use them on my P-bass and my fretless. When you handle the strings, you'll notice they're more rope-like, thus they may not need to have those points put in like you would on a normal string that's more like a steel cable. If you do, you'll want to be more gentle about it, and you should be OK.

 

Good luck!

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Jeff, thanks alot. That's what I was looking for. I've never even touched TI's, so knowing they're more rope-like probably, like PJR says, negates needing the witness points. I'll probably do it anyway, but very gently. Maybe I'll get more than 30 seconds worth out of them, :)but that was my concern. Since I read they were constructed a bit differently. I really didn't want to break my first set.

 

They weren't in the mailbox today. Maybe tomorrow.....

 

I haven't been this excited since the invention of the watermelon!

Bassplayers aren't paid to play fast, they're paid to listen fast.
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Received and installed the TI Powerbass strings yesterday, and didn't get to fully appreciate them until today.

 

The string tension was about the same as the set I removed, maybe a little tighter. I did put witness points on the lower strings, because at pitch, they still rolled over the bridge, instead of a sharp angle. My rig was at the gig, so I couldn't power up the bass. Tension between E thru G strings was more even I've ever felt. The B string was slightly looser than the other 4, but not a problem at all. Fret noise was less than other strings, despite the slightly higher tension.

 

Got to the gig, retuned, powered up and low level played. Reminded me of older strings, with the top end diminished. Cool, I like that. I've always liked strings with a bit of age. Started the gig, and the first thing I noticed was these are punchy, and it wasn't until the third set that I had slightly adjusted my attack, and that's when I started to like these strings. For the rest of the night, every note I hit was there! Each note had nice even quality, even on the D and G strings. Still noticed my dead spot, but seemed a little better.

 

Finished the gig, I was a happy little camper.

 

After shlepping the gear back in my house this morning from last nights gig, I powered it up to listen without any distractions. Each note has a quick attack, very punchy, immediate, across all the strings evenly. Seems to be a little bit louder than regular strings, too. Unless it's the serious punch that's making me think that.

 

Right now, I can tell you these are the most even sounding, consistant tensioned strings I've ever bought, no doubt. Sound quality is a personal preference for each of us, but to me, these are the best sounding, too.

 

Just wanted to give my opinion and share. This was well worth the 41 bucks and some change. If these hold their tonality (some people say the tone improves slightly over time) as long as other people say, I'll never be going back to any other string. Just seems a cut above any other strings I've ever played.

 

If you haven't tried the TI's yet, consider parting with the money and try them just once. These really got my attention. I normally change strings on this particular bass about once a month. If these last at least two, then color me totally converted.

Bassplayers aren't paid to play fast, they're paid to listen fast.
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I've been using TIs for a couple years or so now & I love em. I even got silly & bought a set of my old brand (DR lo-riders, which are pretty good) but there was no comparison. I can't remember why I bought the DRs, but they were gone within a few days. I use powerbass on my fretteds, and jazz flats on my fretless, and I have no complaints about any of them whatsoever. As you say fig, I've never played strings with a more consistent & even feel before TIs, and I see no reason to switch now. They sound and feel like a million bucks, so I don't mind dishing out $40 every couple of years (or so, as it turns out... still don't see any reason to replace em!)

Regards,

~Griff

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Here's a description of witness points. Easy to do and the reasons why are listed below.

 

As the fatter strings, notably the B and E strings, sit on the nut and bridge, the thickness of the strings causes them to gently arc over those components. What we want are the strings to immediately angle off the nut and bridge saddle. These are called witness points.

 

So when you get the strings tuned to pitch, take your thumb and push down on the string just behind (fretboard side) the nut. Do this just forward (pickup side) of the bridge saddle. This takes away the gentle roll and provides a defined vibrating point at the point of contact on the bridge and nut.

 

What this does is:

--by doing this at the nut end, the first fret notes (B#, F, etc) are now as easy to play as any other note on the freboard. If you find fingering the first fret notes on your bass is a bit harder to do than any other note, put a witness point on those strings. You'll be amazed. Plus, the open notes get a little better sound and sustain.

 

--by doing this at the bridge end, you'll find sometimes intonation and note wavering problems disappear. More importantly, notes become a bit clearer, as that string now has a defined vibrating point on the bridge saddle.

 

I do this on all the strings, though honestly it doesn't seem to matter on the D and G strings as the natural tension pulls out any arcing over the bridge. Definitely do this on the B, E, and A strings. You may or may not actually see the arcing of the thicker strings over the bridge or nut. Do it anyway. You'll feel and hear a difference. Takes all of 2 seconds to make each witness point. Do it on one of your basses sitting around right now, or wait until a string change. You'll notice the string height will drop a small bit. If desired, readjust bridge height to taste.

Bassplayers aren't paid to play fast, they're paid to listen fast.
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