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Can anyone recognize/identify what model Gibson this is?


GeorgeR

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This is about as clear as I can get the picture. It was snapped about 25 years ago.

The color is Burgundy, and it is a hollowbody.

 

http://www3.sympatico.ca/georges.rutkay/Gibson.jpg

Beware the lollipop of mediocrity; one lick and you suck forever.
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Are you sure that it's even a Gibson? What I can see of the headstock doesn't look 'Gibsonish', and I don't remember Gibson ever doing pickups that were out of square like that. It also appears to be a guitar with a Bigsby vibrato tailpiece.

 

There's a picture of an EB-2 at: http://www.provide.net/~cfh/gibson9.html#eb2 and it looks as thought the pickups are a different size and shape, the tailpiece is quite different, and there are too many switches for it to be related to an EB-2.

Dave Martin

Java Jive Studio

Nashville, TN

www.javajivestudio.com

 

Cuppa Joe Records

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And I just found an EB-2D at http://www.thebouffants.com/members/joes-eb2d.html which is also quite different. Look at the pickgurad, for example. I still think that the picture is a guitar, and at a guess, I'd say that it's likely either Italian or Japanese. A lot of guys came back from Viet Nam with guitars that were never sold in the US - my dad has a really interesting Yamaha electric that's kind of 335 shaped, but not like the one in this picture.

Dave Martin

Java Jive Studio

Nashville, TN

www.javajivestudio.com

 

Cuppa Joe Records

www.cuppajoerecords.com

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That is most definetly a copy of a Gretsch Country Gentleman. The only things different are that the pickguard has a different shape and the inlays are different. The neck pickup also looks as though it is slanted.....

 

If there was a picture of the headstock I would be able to identify it.

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I can say for certain it was definitely a Gibson. It's cropped out of an old photo, the only one where the guitar was part of the picture, and leaning quite ghastly against my parent's old console stereo (they still have that stereo ;) ).

 

It was my very first guitar from age 7 or 8. About 8 years after that photo was taken, it was utterly destroyed by a B&E vandal at my sister's school. Somewhere I still have all that's left of it, a black plastic bobbin wound with fine copper wire from one of the pups.

 

The school caught the person responsible and fully covered the loss (back in 77 it cost $500 used) but we never found another replacement quite like it.

Beware the lollipop of mediocrity; one lick and you suck forever.
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I know you owned this guitar, but it certainly doesn't appear to be a Gibson.

 

First, Gibson has rarely, if ever, slanted pickups. The pickguard and switches appear to be different than any Gibson I've ever seen. Are those sliding switches on the upper horn? I'm unaware of any Gibson with sliding switches above the strings, and very few with sliding switches at all. Gretsch and others used sliding switches on many models.

 

Please give us a detailed description of all the features, so we may have a better idea of including/disregarding models (and perhaps, manufacturers. ;) ).

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

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fntstcsnd

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I do remember from a year of lessons, always seeing the name "Gibson" on the headstock, and I remember that the switches were a mix of two and three position toggle switches, no slide switches.

 

The neck pup is, indeed, slanted.

 

I don't know what else to remember, since it was 22 to 29 years ago I last saw or played it.

Beware the lollipop of mediocrity; one lick and you suck forever.
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Although I can't say I have ever seen a Gibson quite like the one in the photo, it doesn't mean it isn't one. Gibson made a TON of oddball ES models from the early sixties on into the late seventies, some of which were only around for a few months. It might just be the angle of the photo and/or the blurriness and shading, but the cutaways just don't look right, more like a Gretsch body than a Gibson. The pickups don't look to be anything like I've seen on a Gretsch though, more like those horrible smaller sized humbuckers that Gibson put on Les Paul Deluxes, Flying V's, Explorers and Firebirds for awhile. I suggest you contact George Gruhn at:

 

http://www.gruhnguitars.com.

 

He has forgotten more about Gibson instruments (actually about stringed instruments in general) than most people will ever know. He is probably your best bet for identifying your "mystery guitar". Good luck!

Later..................
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61Pbass is correct. It could be an oddball, and George Gruhn is definitely the man to speak to. You can also attempt to contact Walter Carter at Gibson. Walter and George co-wrote the Gruhn Guide to Vintage Guitars. Walter was Gibson's official historian for years. When I worked at corporate in late 2001, he had returned to work for their marketing dept. I don't know if he's still employed there.

 

Also, don't forget to contact Gibson Customer Relations at 1-800-4GIBSON. They have a wealth of knowledge they're willing to share, although much of Gibson's history in the 1970's is sketchy. Most records were lost or destroyed. They identify oddballs such as this from catalogs in a small library at corporate, and not all models/permutations are represented in the catalogs, even where complete catalog records are available. For some years they don't even have catalogs. (sigh)

 

Regarding the pups... I'm uncertain, from the pic, whether those are full size or mini-buckers, though the thought had occurred to me that they could be minis. If so, this would have to be a post-1970 instrument, if it is a Gibson. Norlin bought Gibson in 1969 or 1970 and proceeded to use Epiphone's mini-buckers to create the LP Deluxe.

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

Soundclick

fntstcsnd

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