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Whats an affordable way to go up right bass?


sam 2000

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I have been contemplating getting an upright and learning for sometime and now i have decded to but i dont want to spend to much foir a beginner. :thu: so any suggestions would be well apreciated
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Of course, the problem with getting an upright is that if you don't spend enough, the bass will be so hard to play you'll give it up.

 

And setups on URB are carved into the wood.

 

I don't know what part of the country you live in, so I can't make specific recommendations. However, you may find music stores that rent basses. In my area, this costs about $60-$75 a month.

 

There is a company that used to rent instruments by mail order. Of course, they run a pretty strong credit check. Southwest Strings, from Tuscon Arizona.

 

Their basses are playable, if not inspiring. I think they charge about half what music stores charge.

 

Remember, the URB is an enormous beast...and they frequenly get banged, dented, damaged. You may be responsible for these damages as well.

 

www.swstrings.com

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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It's a false economy to buy a cheapie. As has been mentioned, double bass is enough of a physical challenge to start with, and it is important to get an instrument properly set up, with decent strings, so it is both playable and satisfying to play - or you'll be discouraged from continuing.

 

You need to approach double bass from the standpoint of an entirely new instrument- it is not a fretless bass guitar on a stick. Using incorrect techniques will only give you poor results and limit your growth as a player. Getting some lessons to launch you on the right foot is important. As an example, I see guys complaining about their new bass' sound, only to find them plinking at it with their fingertips like a bass guitar - you'll never get the richness of sound plucking it like that.

 

The first step may be to find an experienced teacher, or a player with experience and formal knowledge, who may then help you choose an instrument. But unless you can find an inexpensive, quality used bass, it will be difficult to get one at a very low price.

1000 Upright Bass Links, Luthier Directory, Teacher Directory - http://www.gollihurmusic.com/links.cfm

 

[highlight] - Life is too short for bad tone - [/highlight]

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Not trying to cause any trouble, but I have to disagree with the idea that you'll give up if you buy a cheap bass. I purchased a Cremona SB2 a little over a year ago. The sound for arco is pretty nice, pizz is not too bad. It is comfortable for me....the neck is big for most, but I have large hands. I have had compliments on it from one of the guys in the Huntsville Symphony Orchestra. I haven't given up, though I would love to own a 3-4k bass. I spent about $ 700.00 for mine. I think you just have to consider how bad you want to play and what you are willing to deal to with to own one. I was not willing to deal with a used car payment. I was willing to deal cut corners. I am happy.

We must accept the consequences of being ourselves-Sojourn of Arjuna

 

Music at www.moporoco.com/nick

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I don't see why anyone would give up...

 

*I* didn't start on a $3000 bass. I started on a $300 school bass, and graduated to a slightly better $500-$700 beginner's bass...

 

Ya' know... I don't think I've ever PLAYED a bass that expensive...

"Bass isn't just for breakfast anymore..."

 

http://www.mp3.com/Addix_Metzatricity

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If you are truly motivated, then you could attach strings to a bowed 2X4, play it with a bow and be happy. The truth of the matter is one of two situations: you get what you pay for or you get lucky. Myself, I got lucky. I paid $1200 for a Knilling Summit which I found at a reputable local store (not, however, known for URB sales). It tagged originally at $2400 but I bought it for half that. When I plunked down my lawaway cash, I had no idea what I was buying except for a very rudimentary checklist the instrument passed.

It turned out to be a good cut of wood with a very good sound, according to my teacher. It does, however, need to be setup: that operation should cost me a cross-state trip and about $400-$500. Am I hapy with it? very. Did I get lucky- definately. I could easily have bought a crappy version of the same and wouldn't have known it.

 

There is one simple reason why the people here who started on glorified 2X4's kept with it is that they had desire. Of course, at $300 a pop, I would buy it on the hope that it would last until I bought a better one. If you want to start on URB and a local school is selling off a few old instruments for a short few hundred, jump on it then start saving for a better one. In this situation, there's no sense prolonging your bassless-ness to get a better instrument, just expect to get what you pay for.

...think funky thoughts... :freak:
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I shoulda said "might" cause you to quit.

 

Also...

 

ANNOUNCEMENT: IF ANYONE HERE EVERY HEARS OF A PUBLIC SCHOOL SELLING OFF OLD INSTRUMENTS FOR A FEW HUNDRED DOLLARS...let me know immediately. I'll buy all of them.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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A little off the subject but DaveBrownBass might find this interesting being an educator and all. I good friend of my fathers was down near Tuscaloosa recently, at a school. He is an artist and looking around for junk...The band instructor told him to look out in the dumpster. There was an old school model URB. Nothing wrong with it. I think he is learning on it now. Just thought that might be interesting.

We must accept the consequences of being ourselves-Sojourn of Arjuna

 

Music at www.moporoco.com/nick

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Damn Band Directors....

 

You know...in the years before schools had bands (that is to say, in the early part of the 20th Century) all they had was full orchestra programs.

 

And many schools, I'll bet especially east of the Mississippi, purchased instruments as school instruments made before 1930.

 

Those instruments were made to standards several levels above current standards...they are generally great instruments.

 

But band instruments age. Band instruments die, beyond the point of fixing.

 

String instruments are timeless...a 400 yr. old violin, even if the neck were broken off, could be made to play beautifully. (Of course, the person who broke off the neck just lost a million bucks of value!)

 

But these band directors who assume old orchestral inventory just don't understand. And if they aren't themselves using these instruments, they just babysit them. And if the instrument shows "fatal" damage, they toss it.

 

I'm going on a road trip next week...should I schedule a stop in Tuscaloosa?

 

In my district, property is guarded unduly. A knocked around old saxophone made in the '50's that hasn't played since the Nixon administration has to be cared for, counted, stored. We could lose our job for throwing away a broken tape player. Official policy is "fill out a damaged equipment form...mail it in...sometime in the next decade property services will pick it up and carry it to the warehouse."

 

I'm actually forced each year to count in my inventory a El Cheapo violin that is broken exactly in half along the fingerboard. I keep it to show students the inside of the instrument...so I don't send it to the warehouse...but there is no legal way to get the damn thing off my inventory sheet...along with the 6 other "fatally" broken instruments.

 

Now, you may ask, "Dave. You said all string instruments are salvagable." Yep, they are. But a restore of this Violin would cost 4 times what the violin cost new. If this were a Stradivarius, I wouldn't mind spending $700 to remove back and top, reglue, cleat and re-assemble.

 

I still want one of those dumpster basses. If it is carved, and made by a refutable maker instead of Grandpa in his basement, it is clearly worth the $1500 or so it might take to restore it.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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Seems that here in Alabama there are a lot of programs that don't understand the value of the instruments that they have. I don't think it would be a bad idea to make inquiries into receiving donations of instruments (especially strings) for good causes such as up and coming strings programs. Just don't tap it all out. I'll be graduating from college soon and I'll probably need to be able tap a few schools for instruments for my on programs.

We must accept the consequences of being ourselves-Sojourn of Arjuna

 

Music at www.moporoco.com/nick

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