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Do you name your basses?


Cup

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Well the title says it all. I just recently seen something, somewhere on this board, where a member (can't remember name the member sorry) named their bass "Mavis".

 

Anyone else name their chosen piece of wood?

 

CupMcMali...this monkey's gone to heaven :freak:

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I named a few cars, but never my bass. Just couldn't think of a name that fit.

 

Makes me remember Marlene. Named after a Todd Rundgren song from the Something/Anything album. Powder blue '65 Dodge Dart I had from '73 - '77.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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Everything in my life that has any kind of meaning to me has a name...and yes my bass has a name. I am sure you will all roll your eyes at this one, but seeing as my bass is a Fender Mustang of course I had to name her Sally. I know it is not original at all but it just seemed right. :D
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Fender Mustang of course I had to name her Sally.
*Rimshot*

 

Thank you ladies and gentlemen, he'll be here all week. Tip your friendly waitstaff and try the veal.

 

I've never named my basses. It always seemed a silly thing to do. I call 'em "my fretted" or "my fretless" or "my upright."

 

Pretty creative, huh?

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When I was a wee bass lad, I had both a Bill the Cat sticker (Bloom County) and a Calvin sticker (Calvin and Hobbes) on the front of my bass, as well as others on the back.

This bass came to be called "Billvin".

Not much of a story, I know, bit I'm sticking to it...

I have 2 basses left to name.

 

Peace,

 

wraub

 

I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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Yes, I name my basses. The reason why I attach names to otherwise inanimate objects to to help me become more emotionally attached to my music. It my case, my fretless is named after an (ex-)girlfriend. And no, I don't plan on changing it.

I can't remember where I heard that you should name your basses, somewhere on the net.

My upright doesn't have a name, though a bass instructor I had a while ago suggested that I name her BABS (Big Ass BasS). Though looking at the quality of the beast, I think naming it might degrade the quality of the name :(

groove, v.

Inflected Form(s): grooved; groov·ing

transitive senses:1a.to make a groove in;1b.to join by a groove;2.to perfect by repeated practice;3.to throw (a pitch) in the groove

intransitive senses:1.to become joined or fitted by a groove;2.to form a groove;3.to enjoy oneself intensely;4.to interact harmoniously

- groov·er noun

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Yeah, it seems silly in a way, but I think all of my instruments have had names. It's a way of adding a personality (in your own head) to the music. What's worse is that I talk to it sometimes (I'm not crazy?), but I've always done that as well. In my day job I work on aircraft and I talk to them, too. Some people can take a detached approach to what they are doing. I have to make it personal if I'm serious about it. I know every helicopter on my line. I know the problems it has had, what parts have been replaced recently, recurring problems, etc... I take the same approach to my music and my instruments.
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Yeah, I don't have names for my stuff, either.

 

They're just tools to me, really.

\m/

Erik

"To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting."

--Sun Tzu

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You mean you DONT??????

MY Bright Yellow Ibanex fretless is Big Bird (cause when I bought it, it had a big bird sticker on the headstock)

My Red Curbow is Elmo (I know, but I had to go with the sesame street theme)

My Greenburst Carving Six string fretless is called Godzilla (cause its huge and green)

My Yamaha TRB5 is called Joe Meek (becuase I replaced the factory knobs with HUGE Joe Meek knobs (to hid the broken paint when it got dropped out of the back of the van before a show))

I also have my first bass still that I call the phantom bass, because it was so bad I would never play it in public, now its framed on my wall. :cool::thu::D

you can make stumbling blocks, or stepping stones out of the same things, what have you built?
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Originally posted by CupMcMali:

Well the title says it all. I just recently seen something, somewhere on this board, where a member (can't remember name the member sorry) named their bass "Mavis".

That would be me; Mavis is the first upright bass I ever bought (I played school basses all through school); and the $3500 or so I spent (back in 1987) was a huge sum; I borrowed money to be able to do it, then drove to Cincinatti to pick her out and bring her home. It was kind of like an adoption. So of course I named her. But acoustic basses are different animals than electric basses; I've never felt the urge to personalize any of my electrics over the years. All of those are simply tools; I don't name table saws or screwdrivers either...

Dave Martin

Java Jive Studio

Nashville, TN

www.javajivestudio.com

 

Cuppa Joe Records

www.cuppajoerecords.com

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....(Can't remember name the member sorry) Wow, massive typo, you got the picture anyway.

 

Some do, most don't (so far). After reading Dave Martin's reference to Mavis (very pretty btw) I thought everyone here named their basses and that I must be very mean hearted not to....Seems the majority don't.

 

I'm still mean hearted of course :D

 

Thanx. Cup :freak:

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Never named my basses but there was a time period years ago where I was in a duo that used a drum machine, Obe R Heim from LA was the way he was introduced. Obe for short.

 

Wally

I have basses to play, places to be and good music to make!
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Originally posted by Wally Malone:

Never named my basses but there was a time period years ago where I was in a duo that used a drum machine, Obe R Heim from LA was the way he was introduced. Obe for short.

 

Wally

Yep, I worked with one too - the Oberheim DX. We introduced him as 'Dexter'. I had a real love/hate relationship with that machine (Actually,I was using the Oberheim 'system' - an OB-8, the DX and whatever their sequencer was called.) I'd use it until I missed playing with a live drumer, then we'd hire a drummer and play as a trio. After a while, I'd get sick of putting up with drummers and go back to using the machine - until I started missing drummers...

Dave Martin

Java Jive Studio

Nashville, TN

www.javajivestudio.com

 

Cuppa Joe Records

www.cuppajoerecords.com

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What I liked about the Oberheim DX was that the drums sounded like a real live kit. What I didn't like were the cymbals. I prefer playing with a real drummer.

 

Wally

I have basses to play, places to be and good music to make!
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Originally posted by Wally Malone:

What I liked about the Oberheim DX was that the drums sounded like a real live kit. What I didn't like were the cymbals. I prefer playing with a real drummer.

 

Wally

Sure, except: When the drummer's sense of time is not all that solid, and when he feels like he needs to hit every drum and cymbal on every song - multiple times, and when he feels like it's beneath his dignity to play certain styles of music (maybe Buddy Rich could get away with it on ballads; a drummer in a Holiday Inn trio can't decide that country songs aren't worth playing), when he feels that drums are made loud to be played loud, or when his personal habits make him more trouble on the road than he's worth. Then you get the Oberheim back out...

Dave Martin

Java Jive Studio

Nashville, TN

www.javajivestudio.com

 

Cuppa Joe Records

www.cuppajoerecords.com

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Originally posted by Dave Martin:

Originally posted by Wally Malone:

What I liked about the Oberheim DX was that the drums sounded like a real live kit. What I didn't like were the cymbals. I prefer playing with a real drummer.

 

Wally

Sure, except: When the drummer's sense of time is not all that solid, and when he feels like he needs to hit every drum and cymbal on every song - multiple times, and when he feels like it's beneath his dignity to play certain styles of music (maybe Buddy Rich could get away with it on ballads; a drummer in a Holiday Inn trio can't decide that country songs aren't worth playing), when he feels that drums are made loud to be played loud, or when his personal habits make him more trouble on the road than he's worth. Then you get the Oberheim back out...
Dave, I hear what you're saying. I've been really fortunate to have the opportunities to work with real professional drummers. You're right, nothing is worse than working with a bad drummer.

 

Wally

I have basses to play, places to be and good music to make!
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