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Without eternal vigilance.....


davebrownbass

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.....it can happen here. (Post of the day to me for the Joe Bob Briggs reference!)

 

I just got an email today from the community college where I teach bass. Because of statewide budget shortfalls....

 

All Private Music Lessons for the Summer Semester have been cancelled!!!!!

 

Now, I am not worried...I normally don't carry summer students through the college anyway. I have a thriving home teaching studio.

 

Of more concern was the last sentence...."Course Offerings for the Fall Semester will be determined at a later date."

 

How exactly can you even have a music department withOUT private lessons?!

 

Here in Texas, we have the reputation of having the greatest music education program in the country; one week ago tonight I was in the All State Audience. An amazing, stellar performance of the Ravel "Daphnis and Chloe." {SHAMELESS SELF PROMOTION MODE ON} I have worked with 4 of the top 10 students in the state...2 of those have been private students for 5 years {SHAMELESS SELF PROMOTION MODE OFF}

 

And it's all about to be destroyed by the damn budget, the damn war, the damn terrorists, the damn gas prices, the damn Venezuelan president. The damn EXXON board, the damn Arthur Anderson failure. Damn those falling real estate prices...with resultant tax revenue shortfalls.

 

DAMN DAMN DAMN. The Austin School District has such a shortfall they must lay off 500 TEACHERS!!! My district only faces $23 Million shortfall.

 

And the first thing they are cutting is elementary music and art.

 

Like it's some kind of fluff. Like it's not the most important part of a student's education.

 

MUSIC IS NOT SUPERLATIVE. It is essential and fundamental.

 

The ancient Greeks knew it....in primary school, all youngsters were required to learn 2 things....gymnastics to develop their body and music to develop their mind.

 

And once their body and mind were developed...they could learn.

 

We always talk about what SUBJECTS are vital....and never give a second thought to "is there a way I can make this student's brain better equipped to learn?" Because there is a way.

 

If elementary education were grounded in a strong music performance curriculum by second grade...we wouldn't have to teach the same math concepts over and over again for 6 years. The kids would get it the first time.

 

I don't know if you guys are Republican or Democrat. I don't know if you want Texas Bush's Tax Cut or not. I don't know if you are homeowners. I don't know if you are fed up with taxes, or believe that schools waste massive amounts of tax dollars on "insignificant BS." Maybe you believe that public education should be "back to the basics."

 

Maybe your public school experience was not meaningful.

 

I dunno. But I ask you to consider...without eternal vigilance, it can happen here. We can LOSE MUSIC EDUCATION.

 

Now I'll make a bold statement...but one that come from a book I'm reading right now ("The Musician's Spirit" by James Jordan. One of the most life changing books I've ever read.)

 

"How can terrorists crash a plane loaded with innocents into a building of innocents with impunity? The answer is simple. Years ago Islamic fundamentalists systematically eliminated music, art, dance, theater from their culture. The arts are the "breath of God;" in the absence of art, people are unable to move with humility, mercy, kindness. They move with terror.

 

Do Not Let This Happen.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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I hear you, brother!

 

25 years ago I spent a year and half getting a music teaching credential to teach elementary and middle school music.

 

Then a new tax law was passed here in California and the result was that elementary school music was eliminated in every school in the state.

 

And six years later, what a surprise, there weren't enough musicians for the local high school to have an orchestra any more, so it was disbanded.

 

The wonderful Berkeley Public Schools Jazz Program is nearly all financed by parents, not the school district.

 

Now I'm teaching computers in a private school. The school doesn't have a music teacher, we can't find one, there don't seem to be any young music teachers looking for an entry-level teaching job. More cause and effect in operation.

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I found the idea of "gymnastics for body and music for the mind" really interesting; wasn't aware of that. Of course I completely agree with you concerning the importance of music education for children and how much of a shitty turn things are taking because of money...thought I'd add a personal experience to the list of things that suck about the budget cuts, though not bass related:

 

I've got a fairly cushy job at the moment as a manager at one of those megaplex, stadium-seating movie theaters. I make an above average salary for basically sitting around and making sure the highschool kids do what they're supposed to. We make our own schedules, which comes in handy for grad school. I was offered a job this last summer which would have started this semester and paid slightly more than the cushy go-nowhere job. It was as a dna sequencing analyst in one of the labs at school, so it would've chalked up as experience on my resume as well. Unfortunately, when I arrived this semester, I was informed by the guy who was going to hire me (friend of mine) that the grant he was going to use to pay my salary was part of the budget cut and there was nothing he could do.

 

Just seems kind of silly to me that our economy's set up so a giant corporation can afford to have me do nothing for however many hours per week I please, but the state won't fork over the cash (indirect, i know, but still) for me to get a job in a field that could actually end up helping people (medical applications and such).

 

The punchline: the budget cuts suck.

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Originally posted by chromos:

I found the idea of "gymnastics for body and music for the mind" really interesting; wasn't aware of that.

You like that, eh. Here\'s a link to a paper that discusses is. I should actually have mentioned this: Gymnastics for Body, Oratory for Mind and Music for soul. And this music is not only music education, but also performance, art and dance. Do a search on "greek gymnastics music" and find much more.

 

Also check out the Doctrine of Ethos while you are at it.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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Speaking from a students vantage point, I've seen it a little differently. In elementary school, we got music education but it was recorder and singing, neither of which appealed to me. I didn't want to join band in junior high because of the time it entailed, and thus my music education was stopped up until I picked up an instrument. And it was my brother who did that.

 

My brother had the same schooling as I did, took a year of band and then dropped it, but it was in sophomore year (last year) that he picked up guitar, and then bass. He played cello before that (and i played violin, tho for much less time) and has always been more musically inclined. He encouraged me to start with guitar and then bass, and that's how I got to where I am today. I think that the music educational system needs to be reformed more, kids need more incentive and time in school to learn an instrument, because as it is, my elementary schooling was not a good beginning, and I would never have started playing again if it hadn't been for my brother.

 

As for my plans for the future, the college I'm thinking of going to (University of Rochester) is next to the prestigious (their words) Eastman School of Music, so I'm gonna buy a bass of my own before I head off and hopefully learn technique and theory while I'm there, because I'm having too much fun with bass to quit. But I definitely agree that music needs to have a prominent role in education, even if it's discussion of bands, because music really does change modes of thought and behavior.

As I was going up the stairs

I met a man who wasn't there

He wasn't there again today

I wish, I wish he'd go away

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My old school district has a $12 million deficit and another district just down the street has an $83 million shortfall. Neither have a music department to speak of, other than traditional band and choir. Programs are going to be cut and layoffs are emminent. I have trouble understanding how budget shortfalls can be overlooked year after year and no one seems to worry until the State declares it cannot bail them out any longer. If this were any company, a year or 2 of budgets like these would close the doors. I'm not sating the schools should be closed or programs should be cut. I think the responsibility lies in the hands of the administrators who care more about lining their own pockets than bettering their students. I think music programs are important. I wish I had the opportunity to study music in a progran like Dave has at his school. I don't know if it would have made me any smarter or if I would have had the time to devote to it (football is huge in Texas). I would have enjoyed the opportunity it provided. I think it's really important to offer as much to the students as possible. Who knows, maybe programs could keep kids in school to graduate or keep them from carrying guns and knives to school or, maybe it could just open their eyes to what's out there.
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I find this sort of thing really annoying. True, I've never had any sort of formal musical education, but any time cuts have to be made to pull back some of the monies "lost" by paper- pushing-opinion-poll-watching politicians, the arts are first to suffer!

 

Worse than that, it's the grassroots arts that fall first. The powers that be don't seem to mind if a local community college (or 3000 of them) lose their budget....It never works out that the "high" arts, ballet, opera etc fall.

 

The working mans arts don't seem relevant or important. BUT the highbrow stuff? Well those Ivy league, further up the evolutionary ladder, dictators still need entertained.

 

Off Topic, (sorta) I know, but I feel much better!

 

CupMcMali...this monkey's gone to heaven :freak:

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Originally posted by squeennyzim:

Speaking from a students vantage point, I've seen it a little differently. In elementary school, we got music education but it was recorder and singing, neither of which appealed to me. I didn't want to join band in junior high because of the time it entailed, and thus my music education was stopped up until I picked up an instrument. And it was my brother who did that.

It really doesn't matter what kinds of music are in elementary at first. I personally think singing and recorder are great first steps...simple, available. I would suggest that a good teacher could make anything interesting to the student...and that's my suspicion over why you had a bad experience. I would make music required and daily in elementary school. I would have at least one year of exposure to keyboards, followed by real study either the string family or the guitar family. Exposure to the Winds would follow...probably about sixth grade.

 

As far as band "taking too much time," that's one of the worse things we music educators have done. In our quest to have our own "little kingdoms" we have steadfastly increased the after school aspect of our secondary programs.

 

As for my plans for the future, the college I'm thinking of going to (University of Rochester) is next to the prestigious (their words) Eastman School of Music, so I'm gonna buy a bass of my own before I head off and hopefully learn technique and theory while I'm there, because I'm having too much fun with bass to quit. But I definitely agree that music needs to have a prominent role in education, even if it's discussion of bands, because music really does change modes of thought and behavior.

Good ideas there. Eastman school is indeed prestigious...I had a professor who went there. Remember, though, that there is a vast tradition of musical excellence that goes back to the 18th century are further. Eastman School is a part of that. For the purposes of my argument here, we don't necessarily have to follow that tradition. It is the playing of music of some kind that is vital to education at large.

 

originally posted by cornbread:

 

My old school district has a $12 million deficit and another district just down the street has an $83 million shortfall. Neither have a music department to speak of, other than traditional band and choir. Programs are going to be cut and layoffs are emminent. I have trouble understanding how budget shortfalls can be overlooked year after year and no one seems to worry until the State declares it cannot bail them out any longer.

The real problem is the misplaced focus. There is an overwhelming amount of research that indicated the seminal value of music in education. Check out the book "Music with the Brain in Mind" by Eric Jensen. Here\'s the link to the author and his website. The "State," which is really "Us" should become aware of that research, and begin to re-design our elementary education system.

 

Cornbread goes on to talk about administration "lining pockets." While I'm sure that goes on (and I know of some stories) it does no good to slight the role of the administrators in keeping music in schools. They are the ones that have to be convinced. Most are willing to listen...especially to the community at large. The believe (rightfully so) that us teachers' views are biased. (After all, our jobs are at stake.)

 

I always hear the argument that school should "not have frills" "Back to Basics" "Johnny can't read" Those who preach that need to be educated. Johnny will be able to learn to read, and much quicker, if Johnny spends significant time learning to read music. (By the way, reading music is easier than reading words.)

 

originally posted by CupMcMali:

I find this sort of thing really annoying. True, I've never had any sort of formal musical education, but any time cuts have to be made to pull back some of the monies "lost" by paper- pushing-opinion-poll-watching politicians, the arts are first to suffer!

 

Worse than that, it's the grassroots arts that fall first. The powers that be don't seem to mind if a local community college (or 3000 of them) lose their budget....It never works out that the "high" arts, ballet, opera etc fall.

 

The working mans arts don't seem relevant or important. BUT the highbrow stuff? Well those Ivy league, further up the evolutionary ladder, dictators still need entertained.

 

Off Topic, (sorta) I know, but I feel much better!

High art/Low art. I believe that "the arts" are the "breath of God" simply because they elevate and move people. Artistic expression must begin somewhere...and it's pretty hard to teach someone to enjoy Krystof Penderecki if you haven't taught them to enjoy much more accessible music.

 

Art is NOT entertainment....it is USED as entertainment, it is USED as social stratification, it is USED as many things. I think that is what you are speaking against. In the right context, you might find opera very moving...but as Art and not as entertainment.

 

I hear..."The Arts are always the first to go." Mournful complaining. Truth is...the Arts are often the only thing to go. This at the whim of those who feel threatened by the loss of their personal power. See...here's the real issue. A society that moves with artistic expression is full of people who can't be controlled...full of people inspired with the breath of God...and full of people who may be good citizens, but won't be sheep!

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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Dave I wasn't criticising high brow art/entertainment. I was simply noting how unfair selection for what areas of the arts get penalised when the least accessible get off scot free. Here in Britain/Ireland, the National Lottery good causes fund supports many types of art etc. The Royal Ballet Company and the Royal Opera Company always receive more than their fair share. With-out doubt the overheads for these operations are far higher than a local workshop for musicians. But the proportion of the good causes the "high brow" (bad term I know, but I can't think of another description) receives in comparison to the more popular and widely attended artforms is disgusting.

 

Any normal person would have to win the lottery to fund a trip to the theatre.

 

I hope I haven't meandered too far from the main topic, which also gets my back up btw...I must be experiencing an angry Sunday or something!

 

P.S Music = the breath of God is a pretty neat description.

 

CupMcMali...this monkey's gone to heaven :freak:

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Funny how the first items to fall under the budget axe when schools run into the red are arts programs and extracurricular activities, and not horribly underqualified teachers, unnecessary middle managers, and bloated good-ol'-boy contracts. Somehow, cities like Washington DC and Atlanta manage to spend nearly TEN THOUSAND DOLLARS PER STUDENT PER YEAR and have some of the worst grades, test scores, and dropout rates in the country. Do you know what kind of private prep school education you can buy with ten grand a year? And you mean to tell me the GOVERNMENT can't get enough of a price break on goods and services to make that money stretch?

"I had to have something, and it wasn't there. I couldn't go down the street and buy it, so I built it."

 

Les Paul

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Originally posted by squeennyzim:

As for my plans for the future, the college I'm thinking of going to (University of Rochester) is next to the prestigious (their words) Eastman School of Music, so I'm gonna buy a bass of my own before I head off and hopefully learn technique and theory while I'm there, because I'm having too much fun with bass to quit. But I definitely agree that music needs to have a prominent role in education, even if it's discussion of bands, because music really does change modes of thought and behavior.

squeennyzim,

Are you from Rochester? I ask because I live in Rochester and would be glad to help you find a decent bass & make some recommendations. I can also help you find a decent teacher to help you get off to a good start on the intrument & music basics if you like. I study privately with an Eastman faculty member and am currently a music major at MCC. Leave me a private message if you're interested.

 

~Griff

Regards,

~Griff

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True...very true. Back in elementary, all we had was the recorder and singing. I wanted to play guitar, not a little piece of plastic that made annoying high pitched sounds. Boy, I wish I had paid attention back then...I'd be able to sight read music, play better, etc instead of having to teach myself everything from scratch. The lady across the street from me taught piano, and I could've gotten lessons for free because she and my dad went WAY back...but I wanted to play guitar. Why did I do this? I'm stupid, really.

 

Anywho, yes, the arts are the verrry first thing to suffer when "there isn't enough money". If the teachers would teach it right the first time, they wouldn't have to teach it over and over again, but music does seem to help with math and all that. Too bad we have so many worthless teachers...we could spend the money better elsewhere.

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Well, arts classes in schools have been "on the outs" for quite a while.

Most kids today aren't exposed to any music classes unless they're in band.

 

Wonder why they once called this area of learning Humanities...?

 

Of course, what you're pointing out is even worse since this involves people already interested in studying music.

 

But hell, man, gotta fund that gigantic Dept, of Homeland Security (what's it today? code sepia? duct tape security system?) & all that other claptrap. :evil:

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Great thread. Really meaty issue.

 

It speaks to some bigger picture issues that George C hints at above. As a nation, our politicos constantly vocalize support of education. There is a great deal of rhetoric there, because the money never seems to be enough. Teachers (like my wife) are never paid what we should pay folks to whom we entrust our children and their futures -- or their schools don't receive the kinds of monies necessaries for cutting edge tech, intimate class sizes, etc. Public school funding based predominantly on local property taxes is ridiculously unfair. This means that school administrators are often forced to make a lot out of a little (and the cases where this is most extreme are in poor rural and urban areas where the students' needs are greatest!), and somewhere they fall short -- whether it's facilities, certain subject areas, etc. When state and federal gov'ts put crazy pressure on schools to improve student achievement (see the "No child left behind" policy, for example) and then measure student performance primarily by a single method -- standardized test scores (covering mainly math and reading, sometimes science and social studies) -- elective areas, as important as they are, suffer. The intent is noble -- getting our kids to achieve more -- but the practice that follows such policy is poor, as is the measurement of success. (As a research methodologist, I get really, really pissed off by the "test score only" approach, but I'll spare you the details.)

 

I could really write a lot here, but I'll hold myself in check. This summer I resigned from a position I held for 3 years at a 3000+ student public high school district as an administrator in charge of research and testing. (BTW, in most cases, administrators are not lining their pockets with dough -- and remember, when the school boards decide to drop the axe because of district problems or issues, the tenured teachers tend not to go, but rather the non-tenured leadership.)

 

Basically, kids need a broad, engaging curriculum that is not limited to "the basics." It must include the arts, physical education, tech, etc. Ideally there are opportunities for schools to merge what students learn in discrete subject areas (e.g., music and math), that make the educational experience both more interesting and more enriching. For example, a while back DBB posted a great link to a cool site that discussed different tonalities, enharmonic equivalents, and the like, and did so by discussing the ratios used to calculate different intervals. I forwarded that link to a MATH teacher, and he has since included it as a link on his student support webpage, which has a section of links for "Math and the Arts." He has used some of that information in his curriculum. Didn't we all see the greatest math film ever -- "Donald Duck in Mathemagic Land"? There's a great scene in that movie where they show an Ancient Greek plucking a string to make sound, and then pinch it off in different ratios to make different pitches! (And then, I think, build a lyre.) Often we are so focused on the separation of subjects, especially by high school, that we lose out on the beauty of their interaction. And often the students who struggle the most, can be kept in school, involved in school, and even interested in school because of the different ways of thinking and doing that electives (music, art, drama, athletics, etc.) allow compared to more traditional approaches in "core" subjects (math, science, history, language arts).

 

Argh.

 

Thanks, DBB, for laying this one out there.

 

Peace, love, and education!

 

--S-dub

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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DBB and Sweet Willie you guys hit the nail on the head. My Mom was a teacher for years and my wife has taught in the school system. They don't nearly get paid enough for what they do.

 

Only when the connection between the academic curriculums and how they relate to one another e.g the link between Math and Music or Logic and Literature. They all interrelate and can be used in other areas. With some of the stuff we are going to face in the future we'll need well rounded people not some preprogrammed rigid thinkers who have been encoded with the latest formula to school districts test score numbers.

 

<>

RobT

 

Famous Musical Quotes: "I would rather play Chiquita Banana and have my swimming pool than play Bach and starve" - Xavier Cugat

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Originally posted by Jode:

Funny how the first items to fall under the budget axe when schools run into the red are arts programs and extracurricular activities, and not horribly underqualified teachers, unnecessary middle managers, and bloated good-ol'-boy contracts. Somehow, cities like Washington DC and Atlanta manage to spend nearly TEN THOUSAND DOLLARS PER STUDENT PER YEAR and have some of the worst grades, test scores, and dropout rates in the country. Do you know what kind of private prep school education you can buy with ten grand a year? And you mean to tell me the GOVERNMENT can't get enough of a price break on goods and services to make that money stretch?

My father is a music teacher, has been for over 30 years now. My job, which I've been at for 4 years now, is in the tech field (I work for a company that may or may not have written your OS... :D All your computer are belong to us). After just 2 years at my job, I made more money than my father does after 30 years teaching. That is SO not right. This is a primary reason that there is a severe shortage of good, qualified teachers; they don't get paid very well. Things need to change, teachers need to get higher compensation for the herculean task which they do. Without a good education system, we're a country of idiots... well, even more so than we already are. ;)
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Two of the crewmembers of the cable co I work for have wives that are teachers in the public school system here... on friday they just got an email stating that 33 teachers and faculty members are going to be let go out county-wide. There are only 8 schools here, 1 highschool, 2 middle and 5 elementary schools. 33 is a pretty big number for such a small school district.

There have been community meetings for the last 3 weeks on the subject of removing the music and arts programs from all of the middle and elementary schools. Every one is talking about how the athletic departments are not being touched, but they are cutting the arts... while that may be true, i don't think that is the real issue.

What bothers me is the fact that any school programs are cut at all... why should our children be the ones to suffer, when we have budget problems? There are other county programs that could be trimmed to compensate for the deficit. Our children's education should be held sacred, not looked at as a buffer to adjust as our budget needs it. Education is one thing we need to stand firm on, it should be compromised or shorted.

 

DX

Aerodyne Jazz Deluxe

Pod X3 Live

Roland Bolt-60 (modified)

Genz Benz GBE250-C 2x10

Acoustic 2x12 cab

 

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As a retired public school music and elementary school classroom teacher, I had the following jobs added to my plate on a daily basis:

Parole Officer

Psychologist

Surrogate Parent

Nurse

Divorce Counselor

Extra-curricular Choir Director for no additional pay at 6:30 a.m.

Provider of breakfast and lunch for kids who never get a meal at home.

 

I was promised (along with all WA state teachers, a 3% annual raise AFTER 50.000 of us finally marched on the state capital. We had already been behind the rate of inflation for SEVEN YEARS! That 3% (down from the requested 6%) was recinded by the State Legislature this year. Teachers have now lost money due to inflation for 9 years!

 

For those who spout off about underqualified/poor teachers (and there ARE some-one of the reasons I decided to teach as a kid was to save other kids from bad teachers...) I say, volunteer to teach a few classes or lead a classroom activity and see what teachers have to deal with. I promise you that you'll come away with the question: "How the hell do these people DO this thankless job EVERY day?"

 

The testing situation is ridiculous. Now the state of Washington is talking about recinding the requirement for testing in the arts. Just the basics. Things never change. I remember when I was a music major in the early '70's when school bands in Chicago marched in parades with black arm bands on and their instruments in coffins, proteststing music program budget cuts!

 

The main reason I got out of teaching music K-12 was because it was just too heartbreaking to constantly have your performance groups decimated by every little budget cut, scheduling SNAFU or promises to the kids that were never kept by the administration. I almost stopped enjoying music myself!

 

Dave, as an ex colleague, I really feel for you.

This has been going on forever and the battle may never end.

 

One of my pet theories as to why music ed. isn't valued by the general public is that they have an extremely limited view of employment opportunities for musicians and artists. They think musicians are only those cats who play their lives out in some bar and become junkies.

 

I always tried to stess opportunities vocationally in my parent teacher conferences.

Most weren't aware of music publishing proof readers, transcribers, A&R , recording engineers, etc. as possibilites for their children's adult employment.

 

Now that I'm retired, I can see why the levy/property tax method of financing schools is so unfair to senior citizens and others. If Levies continue they should be more of a "user fee" with parents with kids in school supporting the system. Personally I've found the every two years begging the public for money tp be demeaning. The States and Federal Govt. should finance Public Ed.

 

Good luck Dave. I hope things will turn around again for you. Unfortunately these situations are cyclical at best...

"When people hear good music, it makes them homesick for something they never had, and never will have."

Edgar Watson Howe

"Don't play what's there. Play what's not there" Miles Davis

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One additional note, before someone gets to this point:

"Building and supporting schools through taxes, even if you don't have children, is important because it's better to build schools than the prisons you'd have to build instead."

These days, I'm not so sure this argument holds as much water as it used to.

 

Oregon, for one, is now releasing a record number of prisoners because of their state income tax increase being voted down. (It's been voted down every time since the 1930's!

Shouldn't they get the message by now!?)

 

I've personally had a number of my 3rd grade students end up in the state pen as young adults. You could see it happening years earlier due to horrible home lives/role models.

I tried my best to steer them in a more positive direction but it's a very minimal exposure to nuturing and positive experiences when they go home every night to what they go home to.

 

Our own state's jails are now releasing a record number of misdemeanor offenders because of lack of revenue and overcrowding.

 

Will people really continue to vote for school levies to support the notion that schools prevent the need for as many prisons when they see crime go unpunished and the obvious need for more jails and prisons to be built already?

 

Govts. should fund the majority of education.

It's the number one priority (mandate) in our "Education Governor's" state constitution. We have a state Lottery to help support Ed. Where's the dough going?

"When people hear good music, it makes them homesick for something they never had, and never will have."

Edgar Watson Howe

"Don't play what's there. Play what's not there" Miles Davis

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I still play recorder in my theatre troup.

 

We have a strong music program in my district, though it (and many other programs) are at risk due to the money it takes. The teachers here are well paid and they earn it (yes, I wish they'd drop tenure and figure out how to assess teachers). I agree that these programs are requirements, not "extras".

 

DBB, you alluded to an issue about music teachers taking up more extracuricular time. I'm not sure there is any choice, but I wish that more programs had flexibility so students could do more than one thing. this sort of complex scheduling seems to be beyond most schools (especially at the high school level).

 

Finally, I remember what my son's french horn teacher (a HS band director) tells people. If you bank on athletics for a scholarship, it only takes a small unexpected injury to wipe that dream out. This sort of thing rarely happens to musicians!!

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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Originally posted by StoneKnife:

I have to wonder if this hole in education is driving the (what I think is) lack of great new music now?

Ehh, I'd think it's more because the RIAA and the major labels are looking for quick fixes, rather than bands and artists that actually push the limits. I think a lot of great new bands and artists are coming out, I just don't think they're getting signed or getting any airplay at all. But I'd bet you're right, that a lot of people who could have become great aren't because they never learned how playing music can speak to them.

As I was going up the stairs

I met a man who wasn't there

He wasn't there again today

I wish, I wish he'd go away

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Originally posted by Jim T.:

We have a state Lottery to help support Ed. Where's the dough going?

Oops let's try that again! Sorry for the premature e-postulation!!

 

We (in FLA) have a State Lottery that proclaims "$12 Billion given to Public Education"...

 

I'd like to know where? $12 Billion? Over 15 or so years?

I'd like to think that would make a difference..., but so far, nada.

 

I'm thankful my daughter has been able to go to private school, and has had the opportunity to take part in music, art, and athletic programs that do not exist in the public sector ANYMORE!

 

Thanks DBB, for bringing this subject up. It can't be stressed enough!

JBFLA

Jim

Confirmed RoscoeHead

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I usually don't voice my opinions on these types of subjects, but now I will. The Federal & State Government are saying budget deficits are the problems for cuts in education programs. Well, all I'll say is "out of work people don't pay much tax on their income, no job, no income, no taxes paid." If jobs keep going south of the boarder & overseas we're all in big trouble. Not meant to offend anyone, just my humble opinion.
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As a not so aside:

Did you know that Alan Greenspan was once a jazz saxophonist in a Big Band? I swear!

"When people hear good music, it makes them homesick for something they never had, and never will have."

Edgar Watson Howe

"Don't play what's there. Play what's not there" Miles Davis

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