Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

replacement fretless necks


Scoot

Recommended Posts

Anybody have any experience buying replacement necks?

 

After borrowing a friends fretless and loving it, my GASsy little mind started churning. But, instead of running out and buying a fretless bass my friend suggested a different (hopefully cheaper) option. Right now I have 3 basses, one of which (MIM Jazz) that never get's played, the poor thing. So my friend suggested buying a replacement fretless neck and putting it on the Jazz. The sound of it right now is, well, like a cheap MIM Jazz, so to turn this into a prized bass would take some more effort than changing a neck. But the thought of having a usable fretless w/o buying a new bass (while actually finding a use for a non-used bass) is nice.

 

Any ideas/suggestions on the idea? Where to shop for replacement necks?

Ah, nice marmot.
Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 7
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Not to rain on your parade, but it might be a better move to sell the MIM and buy an existing fretless bass.

 

The sound of it right now is, well, like a cheap MIM Jazz
Why start with an admittedly inferior instrument, put money into it, not knowing if it will be the fretless bass you want-- and ending up with a Frankenbass from which you'll never get your $$ back?? I'd sell or trade the bass and take the proceeds + whatever you thought you'd have to spend to upgrade it, and go in search of the exact fretless sound you want.

 

Fretless basses really do differ a great deal from one another.

 

Just .02 from an guy who has learned from his own earlier expensive and unwise misadventures (well, he's almost learned and sometimes heeds his own advice ;) )

1000 Upright Bass Links, Luthier Directory, Teacher Directory - http://www.gollihurmusic.com/links.cfm

 

[highlight] - Life is too short for bad tone - [/highlight]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I gotta go with Bob on this one. IMHO a lot of the factors that are really important on a fretted bass--sustain, warmth, clarity, resonance, etc.--just get magnified that much more on a fretless. Aside from the sliding, really the point of the fretless is its unique & distinctive sound quality. There is nothing as satisfying as a fretless sound & playability when it's all right. When something's not working, though, it's pretty frustrating. You need good wood, good construction, good hardware, outstanding electronics... You don't need to spend a mint necessarily (I'm very happy with my Sterling which I got a good deal on, used in mint condition), but it's GOT to be right.

 

If you're really stuck on the idea, then yeah, definitely check out Warmoth for fretless necks (esp. in their "thrift shop" section--same quality, good selection, better prices, & in stock), and there are millions of them on eBay.

 

I've always wanted to try a Carvin fretless; and they always have plenty in their in-stock catalog...mmm. :idea:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But, but...

Aaww, leave it to one the more mature, experienced folks to ruin the fun...

Actually, Bob's got a good point.

 

You could pick up a decent low to mid end fretless that was made that way for that plus what you could get for your MIM... but then what's the fun in that, right? For that matter, why not just put it on the bench and yank them puppies off yourself... we've got a few guys around here that did that... could probly give you some tips on how to do that without destroying the fretboard... (which is probably what I would end up doing...)

Good luck, at any rate.

 

DX

Aerodyne Jazz Deluxe

Pod X3 Live

Roland Bolt-60 (modified)

Genz Benz GBE250-C 2x10

Acoustic 2x12 cab

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did a fretless conversion little over a year ago to a MIM J-bass of mine. It wasn't that hard, & I did a good job.

 

I sold that bass almost immediately after doing that. Picked up a Sterling fretless instead.

 

Coincidence?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

dcr, did you replace the neck, or pull the frets?

I would think that you would be better off just pulling the frets, instead of replacing the whole neck, but I don't know how much work is involved in that... of course, if I had the $$$ I'd probably just buy a real one anyways... but, like scootdog, I think it would be a fun project. I'd be more inclined to build the whole thing from the ground up, though.

 

DX

Aerodyne Jazz Deluxe

Pod X3 Live

Roland Bolt-60 (modified)

Genz Benz GBE250-C 2x10

Acoustic 2x12 cab

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pulled the frets, filled the slots with veneer (super glued). It was a fun project. But I think the MIM does much, much better as a fretted bass; construction-wise & sound-wise, it just wasn't what I wanted in a fretless. So I shoulda left it fretted, since it was a better bass for that. 20/20 hindsight.

 

My guess is that if you already dislike the sound of this bass in a fretted version, you might like it even less as a fretless.

 

If you're going to pull the frets, be VERY SURE that your neck is in tip-top shape & dead straight. Irregularities in the line of the fretboard--humps, dips, s-curves, etc.--that a fretted bass might get away with will really plague it once the frets are out. Since the string sits right on the wood, dips or humps along the length of the fretboard will cause buzzes & other problems.

 

For that reason, you might be much better off with a replacement neck that the maker will guarantee to be straight. Also, if you leave the original neck intact, you can always convert the bass back later if you change your mind; and if you want to sell either neck later, you'll be able to. A homemade defret, though, is of very low resale value, so it's sort of all or nothing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...