Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

delete


Recommended Posts



  • Replies 4
  • Created
  • Last Reply
If you are using the XLRs for mic connections: 1=Ground/Sleeve (bare shield wire) 2=Hot/Tip 3=Cold/Ring BUT...if you are using the XLRs to connect balanced audio: Everything is the same... ...though SOMETIMES(?)...you might end up cutting(floating) the Ground (bare shield wire) at one of the ends...ONLY IF you experience any hum/noise...otherwise leave it on. Which end to cut/float...that's another debate...but I like to float the output end (at the signal source). Check out this Rane Tech Note...good stuff to read. [url=http://http://www.rane.com/note110.html]Tech Note 110[/url]

miroslav - miroslavmusic.com

 

"Just because it happened to you, it doesn't mean it's important."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I will assume that the individual lines each have their own "shield". In snake wire, it could be either a braided shield (excellent for flexibility, not quite as good for shield) or a "foil shield" (not so good for flexibility because flexing the cable a lot will cause cracks in the foil thus reducing shield protection, but it is a better shield when not cracked!). Anyway, the exposed wire is usually referred to as the "drain wire". It is the wire that is in physical contact with the "foil shield". In the case of it being a braided shield, the braided wires would become your drain wire too. So, I am assuming you have a foil shield. Yes, you should connect it at both ends UNLESS you feel you need ground lift on every mic line. Your audio will pass just fine through the two "hot wires" on a balanced wire without the "ground" wire hooked to the jack, but now the mic's have no ground, which could cause some excellent viewing if a guitar player is singing and playing his guitar at the same time and there is a grounding conflict! :) Some people subscribe to ALWAYS lifting the ground. In some cases, you will reduce noise in the audio by doing so, but this is a case by case deal, and certainly is not by any means a practice that is always done for balanced lines. Some will only lift the ground on ONE SIDE of the balanced line! This is usually done so that introduced noise via the ground is not passed to the next unit in line, but will still provide a way to ground for any RFI/EMI hitting the wire between units. Now you have to decide which camp to subscribe to as to WHICH END to lift the ground on! LOL. Rediculous isn't it? I have heard compelling arguement both ways. I am nowhere knowledgable enough about grounding issues to advice here, but I am sure you will find both camps residing on this board, and hopefully they will speak up. Hope this helps a little. As a start, you can go ahead and connect those "drain wires" to each connector. If you are getting noise on certain lines, you can then lift the ground on one side of that line and see if that helps. I once built my own transformer isolated splitter snake (pain in the ass, but saved about $6000!) and found that I didn't usually need to lift grounds. I just used a global ground lift over each leg of the splitter (there were three splits). Good luck. Dumdum
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You seem confused... We're talking about a mic snake. You can't leave the ground wire floating in a snake or any cable to be used for microphones. If you disconnect the ground wire on PIN1 the Phantom power will not have a return path and it won't work. There's a philosophy of disconnecting the shield (not always the same as the ground wire) at the load end. That doesn't apply on mic cables that are going to be carrying phantom power. Valky

Valkyrie Sound:

http://www.vsoundinc.com

Now at TSUTAYA USA:

http://www.tsutayausa.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, not confused at all. :) You are correct about the need for phantom if you lift the ground. Same with transformer iso snakes. In this case, any mic needing phantom would require a seperate phantom power supply at the stage before the snake. Sorry, just forgot to throw that in. In any case, lifting the ground on a mic cable is usually only an issue when splitting the signal to go to two different places, and popmusic didn't even state that was the use, so I err in elaborating too much! :freak: I know about, but have never used wire where the ground and shield were not tied together. An insulated ground wire inside the shield would offer the best scenario in resolving any ground loop/RFI/EMI issues you can come across short of including a transformer to isolate in addition. Arrrrrrrrggggggggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhh, there I go again! :eek: I will shut up now and go back to being a....... Dumdum
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...