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Instrument Cables- Straight vs Angled


scubasteve

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Well, it depends on the instrument you're plugging into, I guess. And it depends on whether or not you like to run the cable through your strap to keep it from getting pulled out. I like to run mine through the strap, and then down to the jack on the bottom of the bass (it's not a Fender) so I like the angled cables.

 

What do you think is better?

 

bruiser

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Purely a personal preference and sometimes a practical one-- some instrument jacks that are recessed into the side of the bass will have a problem with a 90 degree plug. In some cases a 90 degree will have a problem with adjacent jacks, buttons, knobs, etc., on a head. However, they are nice to use on some instruments, to have a less obtrusive connection, for a variety of reasons.

1000 Upright Bass Links, Luthier Directory, Teacher Directory - http://www.gollihurmusic.com/links.cfm

 

[highlight] - Life is too short for bad tone - [/highlight]

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I use angled plugs when I am connecting rack equipment. But for some reason angle plugs annoy the hell out of me when I use them for my instrument. Don't even know why.

 

Iaian

San Andreas,

The hope to save our nation by turning Las Vegas into a seaside community. ;)

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Originally posted by KikkyMonk:

I find that the straight plugs tend to give me a "quicker" sound. I A/Bed both when I had nothing better to do and it tended to make my bass punchier...

 

of course I'm just pulling your legs

(both of them)

 

Dave

LMAO!!

 

Yeah, but Monster Cable straight plugs are the best!

 

Bruiser

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I already do have vintage cables... well they arn't worth anything so I guess they would just be old. Unless the sounds that I hear are simply creations of my mind (and therefore do not "really" exist) wouldn't all sound be authentic?

 

mmmmmmmm

Dave

 

but seriously I'd go for a compromise and get 45 degree jacks

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My 'wick's shape really needs a right angle plug...the jack is just in the way to rest it on the ground.

 

Unfortunately, it seems to me that right angled plugs don't seem to last as long...even the high quality cables I buy seem to give problems after a while.

 

Anybody know a good source?

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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I reluctantly paid big bucks for a Monster cable with one right angle end, I have a Warwick also. I dunno whether the cable really helps significantly with my tone, I "think" it sounds better but of course that could be purely psychological. However, I did put the Monster on my LCR meter and compared it to an el cheapo and a mid-price cable. The Monster had significantly lower resistance and capacitance, for what it's worth. But mostly it seems made well, hopefully it'll last many years.
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Use right angle cables for patching your effect pedals. Ever have a clumsy guitar player step on your the end of your cable and break the input jack to your pedal? All it takes is once!

I'm sure I'm in the minority, but I have never had good luck with monster cables. I don't really detect a sonic difference, and I have had a bunch go bad on me in the middle of shows.

I have no homepage.
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Horizon's have the same guarantee and are a lot less than the Monster's. Of course, it's mainly the solder joints that go bad with them, so I just heat up the soldering iron and re-solder them with a little more. I've never had one develop a short in 15 years and I've only bought 4 in that time, usually because they get left behind.
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Originally posted by cornbread:

Horizon's have the same guarantee and are a lot less than the Monster's. Of course, it's mainly the solder joints that go bad with them, so I just heat up the soldering iron and re-solder them with a little more. I've never had one develop a short in 15 years and I've only bought 4 in that time, usually because they get left behind.

I've had terrible luck with Horizons - and from what I understand, you have to send a Horizon back to the plant to get it replaced - any Monster cable can be swapped at any Monster dealer.
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Originally posted by davebrownbass:

My 'wick's shape really needs a right angle plug...the jack is just in the way to rest it on the ground.

 

Unfortunately, it seems to me that right angled plugs don't seem to last as long...even the high quality cables I buy seem to give problems after a while.

 

Anybody know a good source?

I've had G&H right angle plugs with Belden cable used for the cables I sell: photos at http://www.urbbob.com/cables.html and CBI guarantees them for ten years. The connectors seem to be very similar to the Switchcrafts, both of which have held up well for me. I am pretty sure that MCM Electronics sells G&H ends.

 

I have some loose Neutrik right angle plugs in my parts boxes, but they incorporate some plastic, so I am not sure about their longevity.

1000 Upright Bass Links, Luthier Directory, Teacher Directory - http://www.gollihurmusic.com/links.cfm

 

[highlight] - Life is too short for bad tone - [/highlight]

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Hahaha, I bet those are plastic just like the stompboxes. If I want a vintage sound, I'll run a Duracell down a little, then play on it.

 

As for cables, jeez, I got all sorts of stuff. I've got a Rapco RoadHog gold-tipped straight cable running from bass to amp. From my output I'm running a straight to angle Rapco into an overdrive, a connector into a chorus, and a straight-straight ElCheapo into the mix-in. That's all my digs, yo.

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Originally posted by Griffinator:

Originally posted by cornbread:

Horizon's have the same guarantee and are a lot less than the Monster's. Of course, it's mainly the solder joints that go bad with them, so I just heat up the soldering iron and re-solder them with a little more. I've never had one develop a short in 15 years and I've only bought 4 in that time, usually because they get left behind.

I've had terrible luck with Horizons - and from what I understand, you have to send a Horizon back to the plant to get it replaced - any Monster cable can be swapped at any Monster dealer.
Well, considering I've never had any problems out of them, I don't really know about the policy. The way I look at it, if you have to keep bringing a cable back, it's not a good cable. Considering the Horizon I have now is 6 years old and in great shape, I would say they're pretty darn good cables. I've only had to re-solder 1 end once. To me, that's better than having to go and exchange them.
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Originally posted by Bob Gollihur (bob@gollihur.com):

[QB\][/i've had G&H right angle plugs with Belden cable used for the cables I sell: photos at http://www.urbbob.com/cables.html and CBI guarantees them for ten years. The connectors seem to be very similar to the Switchcrafts, both of which have held up well for me. I am pretty sure that MCM Electronics sells G&H ends.

 

.[/QB]

Those ends look like the ones I've used before...when I rest my bass on the floor the weight seems to rest right on the plug...the straight plugs take a lot of the weight, but don't seem to fail, where the angled ones do...maybe it's the shrink wrap on my straights.

 

Still, I'll probably buy one of yours...do you sell 10 ft.? (18 is really long for my purpose, since I sit I'd have to coil it under my feet.

 

Thanks,

Dave

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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Originally posted by davebrownbass:

Originally posted by Bob Gollihur (bob@gollihur.com):

[QB\][/i've had G&H right angle plugs with Belden cable used for the cables I sell: photos at http://www.urbbob.com/cables.html and CBI guarantees them for ten years. The connectors seem to be very similar to the Switchcrafts, both of which have held up well for me. I am pretty sure that MCM Electronics sells G&H ends.

 

.

Those ends look like the ones I've used before...when I rest my bass on the floor the weight seems to rest right on the plug...the straight plugs take a lot of the weight, but don't seem to fail, where the angled ones do...maybe it's the shrink wrap on my straights.

 

Still, I'll probably buy one of yours...do you sell 10 ft.? (18 is really long for my purpose, since I sit I'd have to coil it under my feet.

 

Thanks,

Dave[/QB]

Sorry, I only have 18 footers made and in stock. Next time I reorder I could get any size wanted made for you.

1000 Upright Bass Links, Luthier Directory, Teacher Directory - http://www.gollihurmusic.com/links.cfm

 

[highlight] - Life is too short for bad tone - [/highlight]

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I have a Planet Waves (straight plug) cable. I haven't been that rough on it, but it's been fine.

 

My Gibson had the jack on the front below the controls - right angle jacks work well with it. My Kinal has the jack on the body edge, so I use straight plugs.

 

You guys with the Monster cables - I knew a guy that would exchange them periodically instead of waiting for them to fail.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

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Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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OK...

Here's why I use right-angle cables to connect my bass or guitar. The input on my P-bass is on front (face) of the instrument. The input on my Les Paul is on the side (bottom edge).

 

Try this: Front input -- Plug in with a straight plug.... Do a big windmill with your arm while playing... guess what you're bound to do? If you said, "Look like a Pete Townsend rip-off, jackass," you're only partially right, but go siddown and shaddup anyway. The other thing you're bound to do is whack the crap out of your cable and break/unplug your input. Add a bunch of kids carelessly moshing/dancing within a few feet of you, and you also run the risk of getting that cable ripped out or otherwise mangled. The right-angle plugs minimize the risk of these things happening.

 

Same thing applies to instruments with side inputs: you end up with this extra appendage poking out of the side of your instrument. It's just BEGGING to get smacked, cracked or otherwise damaged if you play physically (like I do.)

 

That's why I'll always prefer a right-angle plug for my instruments.

 

Of course, Strat-style inputs only seem to work with straight plugs, so if you have one of those things, I guess my previous argument is moot.

 

Hey, this advice was free, OK? Bite me.

\m/

Erik

"To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting."

--Sun Tzu

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How physical is physical? Well...

 

I once had a very nice, custom-made smoked mirror pickguard made for one of my guitars. I put my hand through it the first time I used it at a show. I had it replaced with a 5-lb chunk of metal diamond plate. I haven't broken that yet.

 

I have the bridge saddles of all my guitars cemented into the body with airplane epoxy because I hit the strings so hard that my luthier said that was the only way to keep them from coming loose from the guitars.

 

I have bent (to the point of uselessness) the tailpieces of all my guitars at least twice.

 

I had a Danelctro that made it through exactly ONE rehearsal before I managed to make it into a worthless pile of plastic chips. That was $250 down the drain. So much for that nifty sparkle finish.

 

I had all the plastic fittings (pick-up rings, jack plates, pick-up selectors, etc) replaced with steel because I broke or cracked the originals.

 

I dunno... I never think about jow hard I'm playing, but it would seem that I'm really nailing my guitars. My luthier/guitar tech cringes when I walk in the door of his shop because he knows I'll be bringing in something that has been hurt badly. Whenever I bring in a new instrument, he does what he calls the "Erik" Mod... It involves a bunch of epoxy on the bridge and strap-pins, graphite splines in the neck, heavy-gauge strings, a grahite nut, sperzel locking tuners, a serious set-up and a lot of begging me not to "destroy this one too."

 

This all applies to bass as well. When I record, nobody can sneak in and fix my bass tracks without a serious drop in attack because I hit the strings so hard. I hope this all answers your question.

 

I really play with all I have, all the time.

\m/

Erik

"To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting."

--Sun Tzu

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Originally posted by CMDN:

How physical is physical? Well...

 

===Lots of really wierd stuff====

 

I really play with all I have, all the time.

I admire you...there must be blood on the floor when you're done.

 

I hope, when you reach a certain age where your body no longer repairs itself, you settle down a bit.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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CMDM, well, you can never sit in with my band and borrow my bass! :eek:

 

I have seen so many Precisions with the pickguard cracked right above the jack that I would say never use a straight jack. And whatever kind of jack you use, run it under the strap so that it is behind you. Also, if you step on it, and you will, you won't crack the pickguard.

 

I bet that's why Jazz basses have the metal plate where the jack goes.

 

I use monster cables. I don't notice any difference in performance or sound or longevity if they have straight ends or angled ends. I use straight ends on my basses that have the jack on the side and angled ends on the basses that have jacks on the front.

 

Monster cables will break down if you step on them too much, but of course you can just go down to your local store and get a new one. If they demand a receipt and you can't find the receipt, buy a new one. Wait a little while and then bring in the old one with the new receipt. You just got two cords for the price of one.

 

Meanwhile, if you use angled jacks it is easier for your sound to go around corners and you will be heard everywhere in the room. :D

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