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5 String Bass


jpis

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I have a 14 yr old who has been playing the big bass for 4 yrs and he guitar Bass for 1 yr . Recently saw a good deal on a 5 string bass . What is the difference between 4 and 5 string bass . And would it be worthwhile getting him a 5 string bass (yamaha is the make)
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The only difference between a 4 and 5 string bass is the number of strings.

 

Ok... maybe that's not enough for you. The 5th string is a low B and, in my opinion, opens up a whole new world on bass... BUT!!! (and this is important) only if you're at the level you want to be at on the 4 string. If he's still in the learning phase (I played upright and guitar as well, and at 14 I was still learning... Not that I've ever really stopped...) there shouldn't be much of a need for it.

 

If this were my kid, I would encourage him to keep with the 4-string (if he really wants a 5-string, make him earn it) and to never EVER stop playing upright... He'll just regret it later, like I do.

 

Hope that helps even a little.

"Bass isn't just for breakfast anymore..."

 

http://www.mp3.com/Addix_Metzatricity

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I've only been playing bass altogether for about 3 years, but I recently bought a 5 string Washburn just out of GAS. I don't really think I was at the level I should be to upgrade, but I love the jams so much that it was irresistable.

 

Actually, last night I was over at a friend's house getting baked, and he was playing this CD with POD and some rapper, and I picked up the 5er and started playing to it, and next thing I knew, dude was sitting there looking at me with this amazed look on his face. I'd never heard this stuff before in my life. I was kicking the jams like a mofo.

 

Anyway, I think that 5 strings are a great thing to have, as long as you don't abuse them.

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Wish I could make your show, Rain/Suspended In Dusk. Haven't been up near the top of the lake for a couple of years. Hope the other Seattle area peeps DO make it...

 

And on to the topic: I started on 5-STRING FRETLESS and then bought a SIX-STRING FRETTED as a backup bass just months after. I didn't have any growing pain problems with mixing up the B and E strings like some who have played 4-string basses for ages. I just started playing the instrument and let my ear be my guide. (That is a LITERAL statement; I am deaf in one ear).

 

I feel that it is about MUSIC and not how many strings there are. There is no proper order of graduating to or from; they are just instruments, if it is possible one should play that which intrigues them or fires them up {even if it happens to be a contrabass sarrusophone ; }

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Originally posted by BassGuy21:

BUT!!! (and this is important) only if you're at the level you want to be at on the 4 string.

 

If this were my kid, I would encourage him to keep with the 4-string (if he really wants a 5-string, make him earn it)

I really couldn't disagree more. Like Greenboy, I started on 5-string (not a fretless, though) and moved to a 6-string. The 5-string bass is not a more advanced instrument, it is just different.

 

If your kid really wants to play a 5, he should learn on one from the beginning.

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Originally posted by Adamixoye:

I really couldn't disagree more. Like Greenboy, I started on 5-string (not a fretless, though) and moved to a 6-string. The 5-string bass is not a more advanced instrument, it is just different.

 

If your kid really wants to play a 5, he should learn on one from the beginning.

Hmm... perhaps I should reiterate. I agree with you there Adamixoye. However, I remember what it was like when I was a teenager. I believe I was attempting to keep the kid away from gear lust and the "Low B" mentality. If I'd had a low B when I was 14 (I did get one just a few years later), EVERYTHING I'd have done would have been in the ultra-low registers...

 

Of course, this was me. I would not dare to impose (or project) how I would have been on anyone else.

 

But you at least agree with me on the upright thing, right?

"Bass isn't just for breakfast anymore..."

 

http://www.mp3.com/Addix_Metzatricity

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Originally posted by BassGuy21:

Hmm... perhaps I should reiterate. I agree with you there Adamixoye. However, I remember what it was like when I was a teenager. I believe I was attempting to keep the kid away from gear lust and the "Low B" mentality. If I'd had a low B when I was 14 (I did get one just a few years later), EVERYTHING I'd have done would have been in the ultra-low registers...

 

Of course, this was me. I would not dare to impose (or project) how I would have been on anyone else.

 

But you at least agree with me on the upright thing, right?

Well, I dunno. Maybe you feel that your order of doing things helped you out in the long run, and that's quite possible. But avoiding "super-low only", I think, is not a problem just for 5- and 6-strings. Learning to use the entire fretboard is something that comes with experience no matter what the gear.

 

And at the risk of being run out of this forum...I've never played an upright in my life. So I have no opinion.

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Several years ago, when it was time to upgrade from my starter bass to a respectable instrument, I asked my teacher for his opinion on string number. His unqualified answer was 5 string, or 6 if I can afford it. I decided on the 5, and couldn't be happier. (I've got my eyes set on a 6 string Carvin now, but that'll be a little while after I pay off my URB.) There's a lot of flexibility that comes with the 5, and it's well worth it. TO best help your son's bass education, I'd suggest that you suggest that he learn both. There's no reason to play only one if he can play two. But make him earn the new bass. He'll stick with it longer if he buys it himself.
...think funky thoughts... :freak:
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Originally posted by matt C:

TO best help your son's bass education, I'd suggest that you suggest that he learn both. There's no reason to play only one if he can play two.

And there you go... Probably the most unbiased answer you'll get.

"Bass isn't just for breakfast anymore..."

 

http://www.mp3.com/Addix_Metzatricity

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