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help !!!! i need bassists opinions.......


anju

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im a high school senior at an idiotic school. in order to get the hell outta that place we have to pass the senoir seminar course. every senior must choose a topic and research it. but thats only the paper part. at the end of the year we all get special appointments w/ a panel of judges. Anyways to the point, if anyone can tell me a few things on how you go through the process of setting your own shows, your opinions on the best gear, and gear that you use yourself.
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these are very broad topics. what you want to do is search this forum. you are going to find ASSLOADS of great information to use and i'm sure anyone on this site would be more than happy to answer any specific questions either en masse or in private (and at great length, i assure you :P ).

 

my advice is to first make use of the search feature here. you will find HOURS of reading there first.

Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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What Bastid E said.

 

If you tell us more about the project, we could direct you to resources that might help you directly. Tell also about the minimum requirements (3 bok sources, 2 interviews, 4 magazine or pamphlet sources).

 

Especially if you intend to go to college, it's not such an idiot assignment. If you get to pick the topic, you might even learn something that's interesting to you.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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Well, the help I'm gonna offer is probably not welcome...unsolicited and from an absolute stranger.

 

But hey, it's the internet and electrons are free.

 

I'm frankly disturbed by your attitude. An "idiotic" school"? "Get the hell outta that place"?

 

Forgive me for being old and grumpy, but who died and made you the arbiter of what is good?

 

It may well be true that the school is no good; you shouldn't be the one telling us. The first rule in learning something is being willing to learn. You sound...uh, unwilling.

 

So maybe you graduate and get out, and get a job. How do I know you won't think that the business is "idiotic." That you spend all day figuring out how to "get the hell outta that place" instead of giving the business a service they pay for?

 

Wait...a thought comes...

 

This doesn't sound much like a public school to me. Sounds more like an academy, a private school. Some place that somebody is paying a lot of money for. So let me assume...your parents have the bucks to put you into this special place, and you aren't gonna have to have a real job...you'll "join the firm."

 

Forgive me for assuming all that. I don't know what is true in your situation...maybe you are just having a bad day. But we are all victims of our own assumptions; it seems to me you are assuming a lot of things about the value of a particular education.

 

I don't know what forum you thought you'd joined, but this forum (and bassists in general) have a pretty high regard for both a)the value of learning, even remote stuff and b)respect for many varying opinions.

 

Really, I don't believe you are as punkish as your post led me to believe you are. Try again.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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I swear, my kids will have to exploit (or extort) some nerdy kid for his/her information, just like I did... The closest thing to a computer my kid is gonna touch, is an abacus !! :D

"Suppose you were an idiot ... And suppose you were a member of Congress

... But I repeat myself."

-Mark Twain

http://artists.mp3s.com/artists/63/condition_1.html (my old band)

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I guess I could see where this guy is coming from. First time here,he doesn't know what our people are like. He probably just tried like every other guy in school to fit in the way most do:acting cool.

 

I know what it's like,cause I'm only a freshman. Pretty much the only way to get people to even talk to you is being cool. I mean, it's his first post. He couldn't have known the average, boring introduction almost everybody has done:

 

" Hello there,mates. What a fine afternoon this is! Just wanted to let you gents know I'll be posting every now and then!

Cheers,

Some guy who's from New York trying to seem like a gent from England"

 

Yeah, he posted diff from everybody else who just got here,but I mean, come on. We gave him the info he wanted (searching the old threads). Once he's done with all that, he'll be gone. He won't bother us anymore.

 

But if he keeps posting like that just to be irritating, then I'm with Dave and think he should shut the hell up.

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Nice to make peace Cowbell. Thank you.

 

I didn't ask him to "shut the hell up." In fact, I invited him to "try again."

 

I know that young adults work hard to be cool...and I suppose it is intimidating to be asking advice from older strangers.

 

In fact, that was what I intimated at the end of my response...I really don't believe he, in his heart, is like his first post.

 

All of that aside, I must insist that young people not disrespect those who attempt to teach them. It is a sign of immaturity, and they will regret it deeply later in life.

 

It is absolutely true that many teachers and schools have all kinds of problems. I often say that fifth graders know who the real teachers are within 1 hour of the start of school.

 

There is a difference, though, in stating that someone "can't teach" or "is weird" or "smells bad" or "tries too hard to be cool with the kids" and "what my school has asked me to do as a final end term project is ridiculous and I will only do it begrudgingly."

 

Make fun of teachers if you must, talk about their unibrow or how they try to be alone with the girls...but don't disrespect the subject matter. If you are not being taught, get a better teacher. But if you don't agree with what is being taught...open your mind and be a better student.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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dave... okay, so thinking that school is idiotic and wanting to be out is not the best attitude, but then again, hindsight is 20/20. did you love school when you were there?

 

and cowbell... as a new yorker "trying to pretend to be english," allow me to qoute bill buford from among the thugs reporting his interaction with a suburban english police superintendant who was inquiring about american footbal games:

 

"Am i mistaken, Mr. Buford" he asked , "or is it the case that, enven though the matches might last two or even three hours there is no crowd trouble?"

Crowd trouble, i assured him, was a very rare thing.

He shook his head, uncomprehending. It was all a bit much: thousands of seats, a violent game that lasts for several hours, and no crowd trouble.

"Am I mistaken, Mr. Buford," the Superintendaent continued, "or is it the case that there are also very few policemen in the grounds of these American football matches?"

Very few, I assured him.

"And yet," superintendent McAllister continued, "there is no trouble?"

"None."

"None?" he repeated, not disbelieving exactly, but waiting for some kind of proof-some statistics perhaps.

"None," I said.

Superintendent McAllister shook his head. He said nothing for a very long time. He was thinking.

 

i don't grunt like an ape when a black player touches the ball either. so much for trying to be english.

Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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Thanks Bastid.

 

I was driving last night, wondering if I was too harsh. Mebbe I was.

 

By the way, I loved school...go figure. I have found it true that those who loved school as a child often become teachers.

 

In case our new young friends aren't aware, I'm a high school music teacher.

 

So many kids really miss out on important stuff by not taking school seriously. (Hmmm...wasn't that a problem 3000 years ago..."it was always thus and thus will always be.")

 

But, as a teacher, I feel compelled to intervene. Students who don't take school seriously often call those who do, "Sir."

 

anju, maybe I was harsh (are you coming back here?) and if so, I apologize. You'll never find me, I pray, stiffened of mind and spirit and unwilling to let our kids explore new thought. This is a sincere prayer of mine.

 

Now, back to the question.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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Originally posted by davebrownbass:

Thanks Bastid.

 

don't mention it.

 

Students who don't take school seriously often call those who do, "Sir."

actually most of the guys i knew who didn't take school seriously are now vigs. they don't call to many people sir. ;)
Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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im actually a girl. though that does not matter. i respect teachers very much. yes, even the ones who arent "cool" or dont give me the best grades. i know i earn what i get. i wasnt taught to recive hand outs.

the senior project is a research paper with a thesis statement, fifteen hours of doing the topic out side of school, presentation to a panel of people, and a portfolio of our work.

for my paper i need at least one primary source and four secondary sources. they perfer to have more resources to reduce plagerisim. my thesis statement is "Playing the bass guitar in a band is more than just another hobby."

the presentation and portfolio is just a review and public speaking is not a problem with me.

papers are checked by a web site that looks for originality if anything is copyed we get hanged. this is a public school that dosent care too much for fine arts such as drama and music.

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Ahhh...

 

Now let the dialog begin.

 

"Playing the bass guitar in a band is more than just another hobby."

 

Well, for me, it's "more than just another" job. So, I suppose you could say that the hobby of playing bass could lead to employment. You could say that about practically any hobby...If you bowl or crochet in your spare time, there is the possiblity that it could lead to money.

 

Or, a hobby could be defined as something you do when you are not working. Kind of like my interest in photography...I suppose I could earn money doing that, but I will never pursue financial reward there. I have time, therefore, to photograph what I want, to experiment with light. But to say it was "more than just another hobby" would be hard...it seems to me that every person would consider thier spare time activity more important than any other person's spare time activity...after all, that's why they chose it.

 

So you have to make the point that playing bass is "more than a hobby" for extrinsic reasons...that it does something for you or for your audience that no other activity would do.

 

Hmmmm...that's a hard one. What unique thing could you gain from music that you couldn't gain from painting or building ships in bottles or re-enacting Civil War battles?

 

Well, here's a clue. There is research that playing musical instruments, especially string instruments, forces the brain to increase it's neural net. As you learn to play a musical instrument, many areas of the brain are active simultaneously...psycho-motor activities, interpretive activities, appreciative activities. All of these areas must communicate with each other to form a cohesive whole.

 

To do that, the brain permanently re-wires itself. Neurons from each of the effected areas actually grow new dendrites, forming speedy pathways to make the communicate more efficiently. As the neural net is increased, you grow....ta da... SMARTER!!!!

 

There are lots of references about this. One good starting point is the book: "Music with the Brain in Mind" by Dr. Eric Jensen. It is available at:

The Brain Store,Inc.

4202 Sorrento Valley Blvd., #B

San Diego, CA 92121

 

email: edubrain@connectnet.com

Website: www.thebrainstore.com

 

This book summarizes the available research and gives lots of references to check out. It is primarily written for the educational community.

 

Of course, the theory above can't explain the prevalance of musicians who do dumb things. For that, you need to get into the psychological underpinnings of the artistic muse...why was Van Gogh so like Jaco?

 

I wish you such fun exploring your topic. It seems to me to be a very hard topic to explore, explain and justify...to those who agree with your topic sentence, the proof is self-evident; to those who disagree, no degree of proof will suffice.

 

"Faith is the evidence of things hoped for." Good luck, and let us know if we can help.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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Interesting thesis. Good topic.

 

You could also view this issue from a sociological/social psychological standpoint -- in terms of identity and the "presentation of self" (see a book by Goffman about presentation of self). Yup, I may be a bass player as a hobby, but what it becomes is part of my identity. I recently attended the wedding of a close friend who I got started playing bass. In one of the speeches which ran down a list of his various "identities," one of those identities was "bass player." Because I play bass I now have the option of presenting myself as a bass player or not depending on the situation. Also, in a situation where I am playing the bass (gig, rehearsal, etc.), I have opened up different options for how I present myself compared to what people might be exposed to thru my work life, my student life, my family life, etc. I'm not doing Goffman's theories much justice in this brief commentary, but maybe you're getting a taste.

 

In terms of being in the band, you will see from other posts on this board that lots of us see ourselves (very self-importantly!) as the bedrock to bands -- the glue that keeps the music happening. We find ourselves in a terrific position of both driving the rhythm of the music as well as having a melodic role. There is fulfillment that many of us get from that -- we don't have to be the one out front in the spotlight (although from time to time that is nice), but we do see ourselves as fulfilling a critical role in a musical group (we are keepers of the groove!). Therefore we get both personal and social benefits from our role in the social interactions between bandmates -- relationship-building and interpersonal skills, identity development, etc.

 

Remember, I'm speaking mostly in generalizations and there will always be bassists who differ from what I've laid out, even a significantly sized minority. So beware of absolutes!

 

Enjoy your project.

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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I started out playing bass in a band as a "hobby" in high school. 36 years later I'm still playing bass in a band (actually bands, plural). By my 20's, playing bass in a band had become my full-time profession.

 

There are lots of books about the music business and the careers of famous musicians.

 

If you want names of some specific books, let us know.

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Originally posted by Sweet Willie:

Interesting thesis. Good topic.

 

You could also view this issue from a sociological/social psychological standpoint -- in terms of identity and the "presentation of self" (see a book by Goffman about presentation of self). Yup, I may be a bass player as a hobby, but what it becomes is part of my identity. I recently attended the wedding of a close friend who I got started playing bass. In one of the speeches which ran down a list of his various "identities," one of those identities was "bass player." Because I play bass I now have the option of presenting myself as a bass player or not depending on the situation. Also, in a situation where I am playing the bass (gig, rehearsal, etc.), I have opened up different options for how I present myself compared to what people might be exposed to thru my work life, my student life, my family life, etc. I'm not doing Goffman's theories much justice in this brief commentary, but maybe you're getting a taste.

 

Enjoy your project.

Yeah Sweet, I consider this important to me as well. However, I can't see that playing bass would be a unique indentity. In keeping with the thesis "more than just another hobby" I think you'd have to argue that either the identity of "bassist" is more important than that of "croquet master" or that playing bass builds identity uniquely; no other activity adds so much to ones character.

 

I'd suppose, say, caring for the homeless might fulfill postulate one, and perhaps mountain climbing would fulfil postulate 2. At least, I'd find those avocations easier arguments for the theme.

 

Gosh...this is a HARD paper!!!!

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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I'm certain I'm not the only one here in my situation, but bass has paid for my school. $10,000 in scholarships was pretty nice. I strongly believe bass is more than just a hobby. Granted, very few make a living strictly from bass, but there aren't that many brain surgeons either.

 

I would assume your school places a bigger emphasis on athletics. I'm not saying a comparison/contrast treatment is the way to go, but a good argument. I would steer you to the archived Bass Player and Gig articles and possibly a book about the music business. I know there are several out there, yet I draw a blank on any specific one.

 

The best way to get shows is to have a press kit complete with articles on the band, photos, a cd and a website. Then, you have to pound the pavement and put your press kit in the hands of club owners and booking agents and be persistant. Then comes the negotiation part. You have to ask for enough to justify your playing there and the owner has to know you'll pull in a big enough crowd that will drink enough to warrant paying you the money he agreed to. My bands have had to play several non-paid gigs to prove we deserved the money. In those cases, when we did get paid, we got paid . The best part is stringing together a bunch of shows like that so you can get better gear to put on a better show/have a better sound to make more money.......you get the idea.

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Originally posted by davebrownbass:

Yeah Sweet, I consider this important to me as well. However, I can't see that playing bass would be a unique indentity. In keeping with the thesis "more than just another hobby" I think you'd have to argue that either the identity of "bassist" is more important than that of "croquet master" or that playing bass builds identity uniquely; no other activity adds so much to ones character.

 

I'd suppose, say, caring for the homeless might fulfill postulate one, and perhaps mountain climbing would fulfil postulate 2. At least, I'd find those avocations easier arguments for the theme.

 

Gosh...this is a HARD paper!!!!

Good points, DBB. I guess the issue involves also defining "hobby." Is there anything about playing bass in a band that launches bass playing to a level different that quilting or competing in bocce ball, etc. Is it the act of joining a band, where the other musicians depend on your participation? But this would be true of sports as well, when one joins a team in a league. The identity angle might not work for this paper, unless there is something special (your word -- "unique") about a bass player's identity.

 

On the other hand, anju, you could use "playing bass in a band" as a "case" for investigating what it means to be a hobbyist or going beyond being a hobbyist. Then your issue is less about bass playing in particular and more about what contributes to a hobby growing into something more -- Turning pro? Making a living from it? Achieving some level of expertise, paid or unpaid? Public recognition of your skills? Generalizations from your conclusions as related to bass playing could then be tested against other hobbies to see what holds true...but now I may be getting ahead of where you need to go with this assignment.

 

Peace, y'all. Thanks, DBB, for the thoughtful exchange thus far.

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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What everyone said :)

 

And its fun.!!

And you are able to create something over and over that you can be proud of. Not everybody has that choice in life, they just live , "they just die".

 

Did that make any sense ?

There is only two kinds of music , good music and bad music ....oooh and drugs is bad mmmmkay :)
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