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Thesaurus of scales...


Therion

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Hello everybody,

 

Did somebody know something about this book ? (Thesaurus of scales)? My friend have give it to me, and it seems to be an keyboard book. Is it a way to do something with it with bass guitar ? And how to use it ? I don't know if my question is clear... ;)

Thank for your help.

Do What Thou Whilt Shall Be The Whole Of The Law
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Originally posted by jeremyc:

It is in treble clef for the most part.

 

It wasn't written for any instrument in particular.

 

Play as much of it is you can, that's how you use it with a bass.

 

The idea is to open yourself up to new patterns, break away from the same old same old.

 

How could that hurt?

Thanks for your answer Jeremy

C'ya

Do What Thou Whilt Shall Be The Whole Of The Law
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If it's written is treble cleff, you have a great opportunity to transpose them bass clef and gain some writing experience doing so. I would also Learn to properly read the treble cleff notes on bass guitar (ignoring the obvious octave difference). Most of what you will encounter out there (save bass music) will be in treble cleff, and it is invaluable to be able to read that material.
...think funky thoughts... :freak:
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If you're going to go that route, don't forget the seldom seen alto clef, which lies somewhere between bass and treble. I've seen cello music written in this, and it's more likely that high register bass parts will be in alto as opposed to treble. At least, that would be my opinion.

"Bass isn't just for breakfast anymore..."

 

http://www.mp3.com/Addix_Metzatricity

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I've written sections of pieces in treble clef for bass guitar, and there is historical precedence for using treble clef for it.

 

But usually if something threatens to dance too long in bigtime ledger lines I simply use a 8va or 15va - or even 8ve or 15ve, or octave up for such sections/phrases, when notating for myself or others. I use whichever practice they are familiar / comfortable with.

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The lines themselves are very interesting...but I'll be damned if I can figure out his "system" for showing how to apply them harmonically. I'm sure I'm just a moron for saying this, but I don't get it.

 

For example, the first page starts by just breaking the octave into tritones...but then there's those reference numbers for "master chords" above certain notes that I don't understand how to apply.

 

Jeremy C's probably shaking his head right now and chuckling, but I don't get it. Li'l help? :D

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BenLoy,

 

I don't have the slightest idea what's in that book (if that is what you are even talking about). But dim, long dis-used memory recalls dividing an octave into half, and choosing FOUR steps and half-steps to traverse the first half, and THREE steps and half-steps to traverse - for a total of SEVEN - to reach the octave.

 

There was some mystical magic reason for that. Consult Phythagoreas ; }

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as far as clefs-the seldom used one thats important to read for bass is tenor clef- it puts middle C on the 2nd line from top (somebody correct me if im wrong). you'll see it in high parts of classical music, it shifts in & out to keep ledger lines managable.
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Other than writing for classical string quartets I must admit I rally behind the vampire fingers when seeing alto and tenor clefs - it's bad enough playing/transposing concert pitch parts for Eb and Bb saxes on the fly ; }
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I just went back and looked at the book again.

 

It is not (and it says so on the jacket and in the preface) a textbook, any more than a thesaurus of words is. You wouldn't expect to learn how to write a novel from Roget's Thesaurus, would you?

 

Slonimsky has invented a lot of his own terminology. Don't give it a second thought. He also arranges his scales according to a system which you will never see anyone else use.

 

There is nowhere in the book that will tell you when to use the scales.

 

Like I said before, use it as practice material to break out of your regular patterns...and that definitely includes all the major scale and modal stuff you know...diatonic scales are NOT covered in the book.

 

A lot of the book is written for piano..two hands. So what (pun not intended). Just play one of the clefs. A lot of lines start in bass clef and have jumped to the treble clef by the second measure. No other clefs are used.

 

There are whole sections of the book where the range is too big for any instrument other than a piano. You could skip those parts, or just play part of them.

 

IMHO, one goal of technique is to be able to finger any note after any other note (and hear it in advance). A book full of unfamiliar patterns will help this goal.

 

As far as where to use the scales, well that's your problem.

 

If you want a more direct textbook which gives you scales and tells you where to use them, get some of Jamie Aebersold's books. Then you can sound like every high school jazz band soloist in the country.

 

I will agree. This book is not for everybody. It is extremely difficult. The scales are not particularly useful. There is no explanation of how to use any of the material.

 

If you are familiar with the composers Scriabin and Messaien, there is probably more in common with their music in the book than any music in the rock or jazz fields.

 

A book which actually has some similar exercises, but arranged specifically for bass players who wish to become soloists is:

Chord Studies for Electric Bass, published by Berklee College of Music

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