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Ernie Ball Music Man Bass


chewstermaniac

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Greets!

 

Just bought and paid for a brand new ernie ball music man stingray bass!!

 

WOOT!!

 

I originally thought that i would like the solid maple neck...but after i tried the rosewood neck i knew that that was the one for me! Its the standard music man with 3 channel eq, HSC, ect....can't wait to jam!!

 

Anyway, thanks to those that responded to my last post....your right...music is as i see for me!

 

Keep the bottom up! :thu:

Check out my work in progress.
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Not to dump on the many cool sounds bassists here and on my CDs have made with this bass with plenty of personality, but that oval pickguard has always vaguely rohrshocked me as a kin to the Crapocaster or the Pee Bass pics I linked here a couple years ago. It should look very fetching with a surround of pink fun fur ; }

 

<-- greenboy ---<<<<    nothing is sacred and forget the freud

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Not to dump on the many cool sounds bassists here and on my CDs have made with this bass with plenty of personality, but that oval pickguard has always vaguely rohrshocked me as a kin to the Crapocaster or the Pee Bass pics I linked here a couple years ago. It should look very fetching with a surround of pink fun fur ; }
Funny, I've said the same thing about Carvins...

 

:D;):D

 

I've always liked the shape of the stingray's body for some reason...like a P-bass but with a more rounded bridge end. And the weird 3+1 headstock looked SO cool to me the first time I saw it...WAY cooler than those boring fender pegheads (IMOHO)... :D

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I've always thought the shape of the Carvin basses was ugly. They're great basses and very nice players, but I think they're ugly. I do not like that upper horn and the headstocks remind me too much of the 80's glam. I do, however, really like the acoustic basses with the traditional headstock. But, what do I know--I play a Stingray and love the Fender headstock.
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Carvins are as beautiful as the eye of the beholder and the ear of the behearer ; } ...I suss that BenLoy took it in the spirit intended.

 

I do wish the Crapocaster and Pee basses were still on eBay - there's some poor cousins on BunnyBass too - and somewhere there's a commode or five without proper perch (sung to the tune of The Wind Cries Mary). Actually someone should do some cartoon caricatures of the basses we play - but some of them already look like cartoons ; }  Pretty much all appearances are subjective anyway {but always subject to ink-blot associations, disses, and heaven forbid - worship ; }

 

I do have a tendency to hate Fender headstocks though: not because of lack of associations with warm fuzzy memories - but because they often make for neckdiving and are just a bit more prone to bashing walls and cymbal-stands than some other basses.

 

disclaimer: speaking in generalities only. local bass icons and props highly arbitrary except as regards function. size of nose, protruding or thin lips, general figure or status mean nothing if she don't smile and get it on with abandon. your mileage may vary.

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my lust for a stingray that was out of my price range led me to discover the greatest off-the-rack bass ever made: the G&L L2500. a few hundered cheaper than a comparable MM, and a more versitile tone. but stingray's do rock tha house, and i wouldn't kick it out of bed for eating crackers.
Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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Greenboy knows I love him.

 

Bastid, the G&L is indeed a great bass. If I did it all over again I might've gone for it instead.

 

Come to think of it...while I'm lustin' after a Mike Lull, a G&L probably would get me major satisfaction for less money...

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Indeed, BenLoy. And vice-versa...

 

G&L is another one on my hit list for price/performance. Flexibility and tone, interesting rethinking of the Fender formula, and like most basses - form following function.

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Originally posted by chewstermaniac:

Its not how a bass looks but how the damn thing sounds!!

Really, that would explain Reverend Rumblefish,Danelectro,Gibson Explorers/Thunderbirds, yadda, yadda, yadda... As much as nobody wants to admit it, looks matter to varying degrees for each individual. :P

"Suppose you were an idiot ... And suppose you were a member of Congress

... But I repeat myself."

-Mark Twain

http://artists.mp3s.com/artists/63/condition_1.html (my old band)

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Is slapping on a 5 a possibility. I know flea uses a music man but does he use a 4 or 5 for the slap songs?

 

Dave

 

I have a jazz bass fretless 4 and want kinda the exact opposite type bass fretted 5 that has a good slap tone. Music mans fit the bill nicely.

 

Also are music mans able to get a couple tones out of them? This is probibly the only bass im going to buy for awhile so I need something to fit a couple different roles (along with my fretless) I was thinking of trying a G & L since a couple people here love them. Any other basses that might fit the bill?

 

Sorry for the post hijack, but I don't want to start another thread of music mans (there are 2 already) and this does fit into the topic

 

hehe

 

Dave

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KikkyMonk: Is slapping on a 5 a possibility.
Try it and find out. I wonder if Victor Wooten ever needed anybody to tell him if something was possible? ; }

 

Anyway, just about any brand that makes a Five is worth considering if it's in your price range. If I slpped a lot more I'd maybe get a Carvin Bunny Brunel (BB75) model with the piezo bridge added (cool attack sound blended in) because the BB has wider spacing than the LB Fives, which I like much better for chording and fingerstyle. But actually I can slap good enough on the LB...

 

Or I might get some kind of more acoustic sounding bass Like the Carvin AC50 because of this guy I saw playing in The Buds Of May who played a Martin ABG and slapped the livin' daylights out of it and got more tones than most electric solid body players do with just his fingers. He did share the secret of the strings that allowed him this huge palete of tone ; }

 

Ot I might look at a G&L 2500 or a Rickie or a whole bunch of others if the price was right. I almost feel guilty for not mentioning a zillion others in various price ranges. But whatever I got, I'd get somethin' good happenin' : }

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...That wasn't meant to make out like I'm some chops monster. It's just that I've picked up a lot of basses of all descriptions and it seems like there is a lot of good flexble stuff out there, and I'm seeing guys on the bandstand and hearing them on recordings, and they are getting lots of varied slap tones out of just about any bass and rig imaginable.

 

The Victah comment was more about if someone has a will to do something it will likely get done.

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Benloy,

 

I absolutely love the look of your MM...is that a flamed top? Is is custom?

 

Me, being a Warwick guy, miss the ballsiness of MM and P-bass (I use the '80's Schecter P Bass...better than a similiar vintage Fender)

 

Between the MM and G&L I prefer the MM (more contrast with the Wick tone)...between them and the Carvin, I prefer the MM; but that's probably only because the only Carvin's I've played were low-end, low-life beginner basses. I have seen the pics in the catalog and I would like to get my paws on one for a bit.

 

Oh yeah, Ben...were you goofing around or performing on that pic? I see too much thumb overhang and a slightly bent wrist...not enough fingertip...don't play flat-fingered.

 

Gawd; I've taught all day...I'm looking for problems. See...what kind of life do I have...watching 7th graders looking for mistakes.

 

Forget I ever said anything.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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If someone did tell Victor something wasn't possible, I don't think he listened.

 

I think Flea slaps on a 4. I'm pretty sure of it, in fact. I think you would be able to slap fairly easily in a StingRay 5. There's a lot of room between the pickup and the neck.

 

As far as tones go, it doesn't have the widest range, but you can get some great tones. It's mid happy, so slapping would sound really nice. If you remember, that was the main bass Flea used on most of their albums and his Modulus is modeled after one and he gets some great tones.

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The coil selector switch on the 'ray 5 adds more flexibility to the tone. Also, the string spacing is adequate for slapping.

 

I think the MM 'rays offer plenty of tonal flexibility. I have also been happy w/ my Carvin 4-string (j-style stacked h'buckers at neck and bridge -- I wanna swap 'em out for DiMarzio ultra jazz pups, but that's another story for another day...). I really like the G&L JB-2 (jazz bass), but haven't found my groove with the G&L L-series. However, definitely check them out.

 

Peace.

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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What cornbread said was what I was looking for... should have phrased the Q better.

 

Pretty much I'm only going to buy one bass in the next couple years so I need to try and find one that can play the most roles. What I really need to do is go to a store and play with all the toys

 

Dave

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Also, don't forget about the piezo pickup option (about $150 more) that you can have added to a MusicMan. That, combined with the coil selector switch on the Stingray 5 (and on the Sterling), will give you more tonal options than you'll probably ever find use for. I'm patiently waiting for my Stingray 5 with piezos that I custom-ordered about a month ago (supposedly I'll have it in about another month -- the pain is unbearable! :mad: ) Once it arrives it'll replace my current bass (entry-level Ibanez), and I'm certain it'll be the only bass I'll ever need, except for maybe a backup bass in case of a string break.

 

Going off on a tangent, I have a hard time understanding all you fellas with 5 - 50 basses. It always seems to me like you're not truly happy with your playing so you're trying to compensate with gear. Of course, I'm primarily a sax player, so I realize my thinking is different because of that. With saxes, you find a quality instrument that you like and you stick with it for life. I've never met a sax player who needed more than one of the same kind of horn (soprano, alto, tenor, etc.). If you want to sound different, you adjust your embouchure (mouth position) and technique. It's all about playing the same instrument for so long that it eventually becomes just another part of you, an extension of you. It becomes your voice. In fact, it becomes so much a part of you that you don't even *want* another voice.

 

And from my point of view, there's really no reason it should be any different with bass. My advice is to find one quality bass that you really like and to play it until it's a part of you. Make it your voice. Get so comfortable with it that you can sing through it whatever and however you want to sing. If a different song absolutely requires a different tone, twiddle a few knobs and/or change your technique instead of changing your bass. Don't get caught up in Gear Acquisition Syndrome (GAS). It'll make you forget why you fell in love with playing bass in the first place.

Your resident bass-playing saxophonist,

Mouse

 

P.S. Sorry for going off-topic, but it's just something I think about with almost every thread I read on this forum. I guess all I wanted to say is that I've always been a one-sax guy, so I know I'll always be a one-bass guy as well. And, oh yeah. . . Stingrays are AWESOME, man! :D

All your bass are belong to us!
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Ah, the Stingray...

 

Definitely THE slap bass thanks to it's naturally mid-shy sound with loads of bottom (which moves nice and fast thanks to the pickup being so close to the bridge) and plenty of snappy top.

 

However it's not a bass that I've ever got on with because it doesn't have the mid growl to cut through the way I like - not saying that it doesn't growl, it's just a lower throaty growl.

 

From what I've read, even Flea moved from his Stingray to a Wal to get a more cutting fingerstyle sound. Any owners out there care to comment?

 

Alex

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groovemouse: Your resident bass-playing saxophonist,

Mouse

Hate to break it to ya pal, but I'm the resident sax-playing bassist around here... Oh, all right, we both are ; }

 

I've played in lots of sections and big bands and I can tell you there are many players who go through mouthpieces - and even neck-pieces - like choco-covered cherries. And lots of trumpet players buy multiple horns for different bores and alloys, etc.

 

And as a wind player, you know that "doubling" is big. I have s, a, t, and bari saxes, WX7, Bb and Bb bass clarinets, a flute with transverse and straight-on neck joints, all the recorder family, etc, and can relate to working session bassists who own lots of wood. Though I did try to spend much of my time on one horn (usually the bari, sometimes the tenor) with one current mouthpiece (Adjustone). But for many bassists it's a little more like doubling is for saxists.

 

I actually enjoy playing just one bass myself, the relationship is totally fulfilling, the maintenance of only one axe is refreshing, and the rig gives me any variations I want and then some - but then, my situtation is not that of either a collector or a hired gun...

 

Yeah, I think GAS is in the eye of the beholder. I've often been busy buying rackmount stuff, computer gear, video equipment, recording studio items, and building studios. All a matter of perspective... It cost a pretty penny to accumulate all those horns and find the mouthpices I wanted and get stands for them all and convert them for electronics and -

 

Anyway, howdy : }

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Great - now I've got to moderate, because we've got two guys obsessed with sax....

 

There are plenty of players that have a collector's mindset as well as a musical one. And there cases where a different bass gives you something different to work with.

 

As to MM, I'd probably be a Sterling guy myself..

 

greenboy - what - no krumhorn?

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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I synthesize the period pieces, Tom. Kind of like painting real good art forgeries ; }

 

Actually I've gotten lots of mileage for sounds of this type by attaching mouthpieces from one kind of brass or wind onto another. No fooling. It's all tubing, conical or cylindrical, of various lengths, and just needs any old vibrating medium {well, except for that one!; } to excite the air column.

 

Uh, er, are we sure this is the right thread - let alone forum, for this? ; }

 

<-- greenboy ---<<<<<    Music Pr0n entrepreneur

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