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CLEFs


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I am seeking information concerning clefs on the Internet. I have heard that there are something like 12 clefs or so to correspond with different frequencies? I was told they are history and no longer used... Does anyone know where I can find, see, and learn about them on the Internet?

Gregory Bruce Campbell

http://www.mp3.com/freakwincing

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I could not find info on 12 cleffs but the following may be helpful. It was taken from the book Music Fundamentals by William Duckworth, pg. 339:

 

The C Clef

 

Although the treble clef and bass clef are widely used, they are not the only clefs that appear in music. Several hundred years ago most music, both vocal and instrumental, was written in the C clef. Today, such instruments of the modren orchestra as the viola, cello, basson, either use the C clef exclusively or employ it frequently. It is also vital for the study of counterpoint. If you expect to study and perform early music, to work with orchestra instruments, or to continue your study of music theory, you will need to be able to read the C clef.

Unlike the treble or bass clef, the C clef does not always appear in the same location on the staff. It is movable and may be use on any line of the staff. (end quote)

 

They then go on to show a diagram, which I will have to explain here for you. The C clef looks like to backward, lowercase c's stacked on top of each other. Like this

)

) ....but more like c's and in the middle section they are connected with what looks like an arrow pointing left;

)

<

) ... this is the best it can get with a computer keyboard but I think you get the picture.

 

Next I will show you various positons of the C clef on the staff and what it corresponds to:

______________ ___________

______________ ___________

______________ ____ )_____

_____)________ ----< -----

----< -------- = SOPRANO ____ )_____ = MEZZO

) SOPRANO

______________ ____ ) ____

____ ) _______ ----< ----

---- < ------- ____ ) ____

____ ) _______ ___________

______________ = ALTO ___________= TENOR

 

)

----< -----

____ ) ____

___________

___________

___________ = BARITONE

 

C

One Life...One Destiny...

Thirteen Colvmns

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I could not find info on 12 cleffs but the following may be helpful. It was taken from the book Music Fundamentals by William Duckworth, pg. 339:

 

The C Clef

 

Although the treble clef and bass clef are widely used, they are not the only clefs that appear in music. Several hundred years ago most music, both vocal and instrumental, was written in the C clef. Today, such instruments of the modren orchestra as the viola, cello, basson, either use the C clef exclusively or employ it frequently. It is also vital for the study of counterpoint. If you expect to study and perform early music, to work with orchestra instruments, or to continue your study of music theory, you will need to be able to read the C clef.

Unlike the treble or bass clef, the C clef does not always appear in the same location on the staff. It is movable and may be use on any line of the staff. (end quote)

 

They then go on to show a diagram, which I will have to explain here for you. The C clef looks like to backward, lowercase c's stacked on top of each other. Like this

)

) ....but more like c's and in the middle section they are connected with what looks like an arrow pointing left;

)

<

) ... this is the best it can get with a computer keyboard but I think you get the picture.

 

Next I will show you various positons of the C clef on the staff and what it corresponds to:

______________ ___________

______________ ___________

______________ ____ )_____

_____)________ ----< -----

----< -------- = SOPRANO ____ )_____ = MEZZO

) SOPRANO

______________ ____ ) ____

____ ) _______ ----< ----

---- < ------- ____ ) ____

____ ) _______ ___________

______________ = ALTO ___________= TENOR

 

)

----< -----

____ ) ____

___________

___________

___________ = BARITONE

 

C clef is most commonly found in Alto or Tenor clefs. The "<" indicates where middle C is located.

 

I hope this helps....Now I see why some use tab..it is a little bit easier to do on the web.

 

Will

 

One life...One Destiny

Thirteen Colvmns

One Life...One Destiny...

Thirteen Colvmns

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see what I mean???? Crap messed up after posted...If you want to get a good picture the book is called:

A creative approach to Music Fudamentals By William Duckworth

 

sorry for the screw up :(

One Life...One Destiny...

Thirteen Colvmns

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Okay, here's the dope on clefs.

 

A long time ago, there was a staff, called a "Grand Staff" that had many lines and many spaces.

 

And composers would write, say, an F on a line...and that would define that line F, and you would proceed from there.

 

This was hard to read...so they broke it up into 5 lines and 4 spaces. The F was written in a stylized manner, but it is still there...it's called the bass clef (the 2 dots are the arms of the letter f, and they embrace the f on the staff.

 

Additionaly, those composers would write a "g", and it's still there...it became the treble clef. Notice, it looks like a G centered on the second line.

 

Additionally, those composers would write a "c" and this became the C clef. And it is still useful today...some instruments don't fall neatly in the F or G clef.

 

When put on the center line, you define a C...this is more commonly called alto clef, and is used exclusively by violas.

 

 

When put on the 4th line, you define a tenor clef. This is used for upper registers of cello, bass and trombone.

 

And you see this "C" written in various places all over the staff, from time to time...

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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In music school we had to write four part harmony assignments....in four clefs: bass, tenor, alto, and treble...and then play them on the piano in front of the class.

 

If you are reading any serious classical bass music you will see tenor clef a lot.

 

In conducting class, we were reading from orchestra scores...where instruments is in a different key. We also had to play the piano from the score. We were told that the secret to transposing was to see the music in a different clef.

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