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I BOUGHT A COOL DRUM MACHINE ROLAND DR-220


ERIC31

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Nice job Eric. I used to play with a drum machine all the time and it really improved my timing. I'm thinking about getting another one to put in the (new studio)(practice room) guest bedroom. You should be able to find some pretty cool preset beats to play with.

 

the new and improved 'married' ikestr

...hertz down low....
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Originally posted by ERIC31:

Anyone else practice with a drum machine? What do you guys think about drum machines?

Answer to question #1: NO! :cry: Music is alive . . . drum machines are not." As a 28-year drummer who has made the change to bass, I still loathe (despise, hate, look down upon, smash with large hammers) all drum machines. They are a blot on humanity.

 

If you need to work on your time -- and far too many bass players do need the work -- use a metronome. If you want to do a Bill Murray lounge-lizard retrospective, get a drum machine.

 

You know how worked up the union guys get about the union threads? You know how irate some guys get about TAB? That's me on the drum machine topic. It's just one step removed from the guy programming bass lines into his synthesizer and splitting the take among one fewer musician. (I wonder if Ian Anderson has thought of that!)

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i suppose a drum machine would be a little more fun to practice with than a metronome, and more than likely smarter than any drummer i've met... yuk yuk yuk.

 

but in terms of electronic music devices, samplers. do you have any idea what p. diddy pays for a beat? holy crow. it's enough to make flashbozo thik about hitting the bossa nova button on that old dusty casio.

Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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Originally posted by Bastid E:

i suppose a drum machine would be a little more fun to practice with than a metronome, and more than likely smarter than any drummer i've met... yuk yuk yuk.

:thu: You make my point! A drum machine IS smarter than any drummer you've likely met. (We've not met.) It hits the same beat the same way every SINGLE time! No interpretation. No surprises. No music. It's like practicing tennis against a tennis machine . . . or practicing football against a tackling dummy . . . or learning to drive on a Nintendo . . . or playing "Operation" (a Milton-Bradley game) and thinking you're a surgeon.

 

I'm not over-the-top in this, am I? What do you really think?

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i agree with you flash. there is no substitute for a live drummer. i'm just saying why not practice with a drum machine rather than just a metronome? there's no harm and it's not putting any drummers out of work. i personally can't get a drummer into my bedroom and if i could my neighbors probably wouldn't like it.

 

as for your intelligence, you're not a drummer anymore, are you?

 

by the way, i in no way endorse the use of smartdrink.

Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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Originally posted by dBunny:

Originally posted by FlashBazbo:

How would you feel about people buying bass machines as a bass substitute?

COOL! Where can I get one of those? :D
taurus bass pedals. geddy lee uses 'em all the time.
Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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Metronomes tend to go Clik-Clik-Clik-Clik, or, maybe Dit-Clik-Clik-Clik, but drum machines at least offer you upbeats, downbeats, accents, etc. that are more fun and useful to play with. The one I am using is sufficient for demos, and can sample from cd's to make it even more interesting.

All that said, I would almost rather play with a bad drummer than a drum machine, if only for the nuances available from a human (even the not fully skilled, like some players I have jammed with.)

 

Plus, interacting with actual people can be a useful life skill, or so I am told.

Try it all, it only helps you improve. If it doesn't, don't do it anymore. :)

 

Peace,

 

wraub

 

I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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Originally posted by wraub:

The one I am using is sufficient for demos, and can sample from cd's to make it even more interesting.

and the secret ingredient is Krusty brand caugh syrup! i know what particular glass wraub mixes his sonic flaming maux in. for a price i'll tell.
Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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Drummers are mostly just a drag. They're too loud (for apartment living),they take up too much space, and they always want to do the big drum solo. My drum machine is happy to play that same tired beat over and over until I am happy. I've never met a drummer that would do that. Plus they're too excitable, and they are always freaking out, thank goodness for Dr. Rythym. Now all that I need is a bass machine, for true liberation.

 

John Brown

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Originally posted by Bastid E:

Originally posted by wraub:

The one I am using is sufficient for demos, and can sample from cd's to make it even more interesting.

and the secret ingredient is Krusty brand caugh syrup! i know what particular glass wraub mixes his sonic flaming maux in. for a price i'll tell.
Yo, E, if you keep it to yourself, I'll tell you about the NEW version!

48 tracks, 10,000 samples!

(plus, you really should hear this thing...)

Back to you... :)

 

Peace,

 

wraub

 

I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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Originally posted by Bastid E:

as for your intelligence, you're not a drummer anymore, are you?

I think I was smarter then. (Younger, anyway.)

 

For the record: Drummers drive me up the wall, too. I always think I could play it better. "It would sound SOOOOO good if he would just . . . ." (Probably the same things former bass players are thinking about me.)

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I haven't tried playing with a drum machine, so I can't comment on that. The drummers I've played with have always been solid, so I have no problem working with a drummer. Some have been "interesting" people, but good musicians.

 

One guy I jammed with had an electronic kit, which solves the apartment/volume issue nicely. I can't comment on real vs. electronic drums, but they sounded pretty good to me.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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I don't have a drum machine; I've got a rhythm machine. You CAN program in the bass player on it! Also piano, guitars, horns...and, oh yes, drums. The nice thing about it for practicing is that I can program in the chord changes, & (more often) program in the drum pattern I know the live drummer will use, & practice playing against the pattern at different tempos. So I use it not as a drummer-substitute, but as a way to prep for playing better with the real thing. The obvious drawback of the drum machine is that it lacks the expression & choices of a good drummer. But no one's talking about firing drummers in favor of a box, right? (At least, I'm not!) But the better in control of the groove the drum machine gets you, the more ready you are to free up mind space for on-the-spot interaction with the real thing. At least, that's what works for me. YMMV.
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