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Success percentage of a top songwriter


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I had this in my notes about Bobby Braddock, country music songwriter. He wrote what many consider the best country song of all time, "He Stopped Loving Her Today" made famous by George Jones. CMA Song of the Year in 1980 and 1981. I wonder if that's the only song that made it twice? Of course, he wrote a LOT of others, too. Including a recent hit by Toby Keith that I feel I could have written. Should have written! "I Wanna Talk About Me." A cool song about how some women behave.

 

Anyway...

 

1,200 songs written

80 charted

32 Top 10

13 Number 1

 

80 charted... that's 6.7% of his work.

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Originally posted by LiveMusic:

Bobby Braddock, country music songwriter.

1,200 songs written

80 charted

32 Top 10

13 Number 1

 

80 charted... that's 6.7% of his work.

My income.....about 6.7% of his.

 

later,

 

Mike

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Originally posted by LiveMusic:

I had this in my notes about Bobby Braddock, country music songwriter. He wrote what many consider the best country song of all time, "He Stopped Loving Her Today" made famous by George Jones. CMA Song of the Year in 1980 and 1981. I wonder if that's the only song that made it twice? Of course, he wrote a LOT of others, too. Including a recent hit by Toby Keith that I feel I could have written. Should have written! "I Wanna Talk About Me." A cool song about how some women behave.

 

Anyway...

 

1,200 songs written

80 charted

32 Top 10

13 Number 1

 

80 charted... that's 6.7% of his work.

Were all 1200 out there to be picked up? I would have a hard time believing that..How many were recorded? Then do a percentage of the charted ones etc. I think the percentage of Songwriters who make it, is the same percentage of Talent formula that is always out there. a MINUTE hanfull of musicians in a scene are really talented..Just about the same ratio of really talened songwriters out there...Just like the same ration of really talented songwriters how have songs that chart. I'm finding the same approximate ratio of talent-success wherever i live, play or visit..Weird eh?

 

Sean

 

www.seanmmormelo.com

Sean Michael Mormelo

www.seanmmormelo.com

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Don't forget, if Braddock worked/works for a publishing house, he's expected to write x songs per year, regardless of whether or not they get demo'd or cut on an album. In addition, he may not have offered all those 1200 to the market. Regardless, even consistant charting songwriters like Max D. Barnes, Max T. Barnes, Mac MacAnally, Paul Overstreet, and Don Schlitz have plenty of songs that just don't make the top of the charts, or the charts at all.

 

I have an album from the McCarter sisters. Cost me a buck in the cutout bin. The album is rather lackluster, although the girls can sing well, the band was A list, and many of the songs were cowritten by several of the songwriters above and other proven quantities. Did they write dogs? No. Lots of things contributed to those songs not making it.

 

Just listen to Mark Chestnutt's version of Friends In Low Places (which was released PRIOR to Garth Brooks' single). It just lays there. Garths had all the character a slow country anthem could ask for. The fact is, even if every song from one writer was demo'd and offered, plenty of good or great songs will never get cut. There aren't enough major label projects to support that from even a few, top, songwriters.

 

My 2 cents.

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

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  • 3 years later...

Yeah, stone cold topic, but I had to add this ...

 

1200 songs written? Yeah, maybe if I was paid to write 30 songs a year for 40 years I might be able to do that. But I couldn't attest to the quality of them all. :P (And a lot of them would be 12-bar blues.)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Country music, has 15% of all the raido airply, as a genre. That makes it, as far as royalties are concerned, the most lucrative place to get a hit.

 

That's significant when compared to Hip Hop, which is huge in urban areas, but nationally not even close to country.

 

That being said, if you are a songwriter, then Nashville is ground zero.

 

There are as many hard luck tales and ten year struggles to be an overnight success in that town as you will ever count.

 

Sit through a set at the Blue Bird some evening and hear folks like Don Henry, Marv Green or Jim Collins tell how that they'd just about gave up and then wham, they got that first cut.

 

That after years of getting the door slammed on thier foot.

 

I wrote a very well crafted song about that, Music Row, boy and girl looking for their big break, played it last year at the Blue Bird.

 

It was well recieved, some of the best songs you've never heard as I like to say...

 

R

 

FWIW

 

Rob

Label on the reverb, inside 1973 Ampeg G-212: "Folded Line Reverberation Unit" Manufactured by beautiful girls in Milton WIS. under controlled atmosphere conditions.
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  • 3 weeks later...

hi Rob,

 

being an australian living in London that stat about country music being 15% of the market fascinates me...i knew it was big but never realised how dominant.

 

would you happen to know the % of radio airplay for rock, hiphop, r&b etc? is country also the most dominant in terms of number of units sold?

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