Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

What do you look for when buying audio software?


Recommended Posts



  • Replies 10
  • Created
  • Last Reply
That's a damn good question, and one that deserves a bunch of answers. A few comments... First, I look for personal "chemistry" with a particular program. This is no different than choosing a guitar that "feels" right. Different people's brains are wired differently, so what tickles my fancy might not tickle yours. In my opinion, sequencer programs these days have reached a level where the similarities are far greater than the differences. I dare say that if you walked into a store and were told you could only buy Sonar, or Cubase, or Logic, or whatever, you would learn to make music with it and find that it would do the job for you. Sometimes it's the subtleties that make the difference. Second, I look for ease of use. I don't want to have to think when using software. I also want compatibility with hardware controllers. Again, this is a deep topic as it touches on features, ergonomics, budget, etc. Perhaps I'll add some more comments after others get to chime it.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[[which ever program you choose, make sure you download the demo first, and get to know the program, and then either buy it or download the full version off the net for free.]] You got it right until the end. If you evaluate a program and like it enough to use it, then you should buy it. Period.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Craig on chemistry and ease of use (also known as good design), but I also look for - - reliability (it's no good if it crashes all the time) - sound quality (or what's the point?) - compatibility (will it run plug-ins or interface with other products?) - hardware requirements (does it require expensive or proprietary HW?) - support (can I get help if something goes wrong?) - flexibility (is it adaptable to my needs and way of working?) - and most importantly, POWER, i.e. the ability to accomplish what I want it to accomplish with a minimum of fuss and manual effort. If a program is slow or tedious, I'd suggest moving on to something better, because something better DOES exist in this day and age.

The Black Knight always triumphs!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks like this topic was cross posted. Ethan Winer makes some excellent comments about copy protection over [url=http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=2;t=003690]here[/url] . Copy protection is probably one of the most overlooked aspects of software, yet, it is one of the most important things that you might have to deal with. -Dylan
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote]which ever program you choose, make sure you download the demo first, and get to know the program, and then either buy it or download the full version off the net for free.[/quote]Great advice- While you're at it why not just break into a music store and steal all the instruments you need. Then you can download some ripped mp3's and make some loops to use with your cracked software. Maybe "waveyl" is smokin' some crack too. Gee, I got so annoyed that I forgot the topic. Anyway, what I wanted when I started was the ability to have a total "Virtual Studio". I was interested in using software synths and samplers to eliminate the need to buy hardware and save money. This was about three years ago and I feel that my objective has been realized but I went through a lot of software to find what worked without a lot of problems. I have been using Cubase and I keep the system very basic. I don't use much in the way of third party plugins except for a few VST instruments. I prefer to have a reliable system and I found that having a million plugins was creating problems. I also wanted a software which was easy to use and had a complete feature set. I tried Logic and even though friends used it it seemed difficult to set up. I had previous experience with Protools and Sonic Solutions and when I tried Cubase it was easy to get started. It is also extremely important to select a good computer for audio software. Many off the shelf systems are inadequate. I have found Intel based systems to be less risky than AMD. The configuration of the PC is also important. If you can afford a Macintosh then you can eliminate a lot of this risk but even Macintosh users have to consider the setup of the system to get good results.

Mac Bowne

G-Clef Acoustics Ltd.

Osaka, Japan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote]Originally posted by gtrmac@hotmail.com: [b] [quote]which ever program you choose, make sure you download the demo first, and get to know the program, and then either buy it or download the full version off the net for free.[/quote]Great advice- While you're at it why not just break into a music store and steal all the instruments you need. Then you can download some ripped mp3's and make some loops to use with your cracked software. Maybe "waveyl" is smokin' some crack too.[/b][/quote]Great idea! While you're there, grab me a Les Paul, OK? :D
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some great advice! And I [b]buy[/b] software. Stealing is just plain wrong and the laws of Karma pass over nobody. 'Nuf said. Here are some other responses I've received from the Digital Recording forum: -Type of copy protection (major concern) -Diverse processing options and plugin architecture -Large user base I hope this post can help others navigate through their software choices and not turn into a piracy debate. Thanks for your help and keep the suggestions coming :thu:
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also like programs that give me a rush when I boot them up -- that feeling of anticipation that something cool is going to happen. OF course, you'll never get this feeling if the program is glitchy, because when you boot it up you'll be wondering how long before it crashes...yes reliability is high on the list!! Graphics are also important to me. I usually go for what's simplest, not necessarily what is most artistic or beautiful. IMHO, a good example of a program that mixes both simplicity and aesthetics is Ableton's Live.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Something that is easy to use, intuitive. If it's not intuitive -- if it doesn't make sense to you, then the rest doesn't matter. The sound quality is primarily in the soundcards/converters/whatever, so get something that really feels and looks right, and then just get the best converter that you can.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...