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I recently bought a new 250GB C: drive for my computer. It worked fine. Then the other day, after the motherboard did its post (and recognized all drives), Windows XP would not load. There was just a cursor flashing on a blank screen.

 

After much trial and error, I repaired the installion of XP on the drive and re-activated. It worked fine, booted up, I used the computer all day yesterday, even turned if off at one point and turned it on several hours later...worked great.

 

Today I turned it on, same deal as before: Boot, recognize drive, wouldn't recognize OS. Well, I'm going to try another reinstall and see what happens -- I hate the idea of having to re-install/re-authorize all my programs :( -- but I wonder if any of you have noticed this type of thing before, and what the cause was. I suspect the hard drive has a problem, although I don't know why the Mobo would recognize it. I do have removeable drives, and yesterday, before it was "fixed," I booted off an old version of Windows and the computer recognized the questionable drive when it was installed as a slave.

 

Any thoughts?!?

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It sounds like the area of the disk where the master boot record resides may be questionable - especially since it seems to work fine as a slave (and not used as a boot disk).

 

You can try running: fdisk /mbr

Details here:

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;69013

 

You should be able to run that command without destroying data but backup before you do it just in case.

aka riffing

 

Double Post music: Strip Down

 

http://rimspeed.com

http://loadedtheband.com

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A few things come to mind, Craig. First, Id check the BIOS and make sure that its set to boot from the HD first. Also, if your MB supports SMART monitoring then I'd enable it as it can detect problems with drives. Next, if the drive isnt already on its own IDE/ bus then Id make it so. Once the drive is on its own bus then you might experiment with changing the jumper settings between Master and Cable select. Some drives work best with either setting. Of course if you are using a SATA drive then you dont have to worry about this. Another thing to check is your boot.ini file. It should look something like this:

 

[boot loader]

timeout=30

default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS

[operating systems]

multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP World Domination Edition :D " /fastdetect /NoExecute=OptIn

 

Otherwise, if you have another XP or 2000 system then Id recommend slapping that HD in an external USB or Firewire drive enclosure and running a full scandisk on the drive. If worse comes to worse then at least you can easily back it up to your working system. FWIW, I highly recommend Seagate drives. They are very fast, quiet, and come with the best warranty in the biz (5 years). Good luck!

 

-Dylan

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i mean a KVM Switch !!!

 

when the keyboard is not recognized by System

start, a black screen with a blinking cursor

is the result!

 

Most likely it is that.

It seems to happen more often with ASUS P4C800-E Deluxe motherboards. Don't ask me why.

I have 4 computers with a ASUS P4C800-E Deluxe, and it did happen from time to time.

With me it was the USB keyboard connector who was not tight ----> Plug it in, and restart.

 

-

-Peace, Love, and Potahhhhto
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<

 

I don't think so, just the usual IDE but I'm not sure.

 

<

 

The process just starts all over again (mobo recognizes drives, posts) then goes back to the flashing cursor.

 

<>

 

Sounds good, but the details say it applies to DOS, W95, W98, and Millennium Edition, not XP Pro...

 

<

 

Far as I know. The thing is, it worked fine for a while, stopped working, worked fine...we do have electrical storms around here, I wonder if something got fried.

 

<>

 

I've done that, and also booted from CD-ROM when I repaired the OS.

 

<>

 

I don't think it doesn, it's a Tyan dual Athlon mobo, circa 2002.

 

<>

 

It is. I disconnected the slave just in case.

 

<>

 

It definitely wants Master.

 

<

start, a black screen with a blinking cursor

is the result!>>

 

Now that's a very very very interesting point! I think it's time to try another keyboard and see what happens...

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Craig, i just woke up again dreaming about your problem...

 

the black screen of death (BSOD) was a issue with Windows 3.0, but you said it's XP!!

 

NEW: __________________________________________

 

1) 80 POL IDE cabel is defect

 

2) Black screen on startup after you upgrade to Windows XP Professional ---->

 

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/318031/EN-US/

 

or

 

http://search.microsoft.com/search/results.aspx?view=en-us&st=b&na=82&qu=Black+screen+on+startup+

 

-

-Peace, Love, and Potahhhhto
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Craig, have you tried:

 

Checking your BIOS settings? Maybe something there is messed up... not likely, since you mentioned it went from working to not working, then working and then not working again, but you never know.

 

Resetting CMOS? Pull the battery off the mobo, let it sit for a bit, reinsert, and reboot. Check with your mobo manufacturer's website for more on this BEFORE trying. :)

 

Sorry to hear you've been having problems. :(

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Originally posted by Philip O'Keefe:

Craig, have you tried:

 

Checking your BIOS settings? Maybe something there is messed up... not likely, since you mentioned it went from working to not working, then working and then not working again, but you never know.

 

Resetting CMOS? Pull the battery off the mobo, let it sit for a bit, reinsert, and reboot. Check with your mobo manufacturer's website for more on this BEFORE trying. :)

 

Sorry to hear you've been having problems. :(

You got close to the problem when I had these symtoms. Turned out it was a dead battery. If I used the pc often, it worked okay. If I skipped a day or two, I had to reload a lot of the bios sections. After I replaced the battery, the problem went away. Slowly

 "Let It Be!"

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Originally posted by Dylan:

First, Id check the BIOS and make sure that its set to boot from the HD first.

I agree.Sometimes bios either resets or gets corrupted on some boards,happened to my brother a couple of times.I changed the drive settings to "Auto" in bios forcing bios to recognize the drives all over again and that worked for us.Also if your main drive is IDE and your recording drive is SATA,try disconnecting the SATA drive,set bios to Auto again and see what happens.
"A Robot Playing Trumpet Blows"
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http://support.microsoft.com/kb/q228734/

 

I know it refers to Win NT4, but OTOH, the black screen / blinking cursor in upper corner of the screen description sounds a LOT like what you described Craig - in the NT4 instances, it was fragmented MFT (master file table - the drive's basic directory of all files) related.

 

Again, I think the problem is most likely BIOS / CMOS related, or possibly MFT or even "dying drive" or "dying mobo" related, and IMO, the best solution, if the problem remains after checking the BIOS issues would be 1) remove the drive to a second (bootable) machine and back it up, then run scandisk on it. If you can't fix it, replace the drive... if the problem is still occurring, then maybe a mobo replacement is in order. Those lightening strikes would concern me too. I hope you have some good AC line protection and / or pull the plugs when big storms come in.

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There's something about the drive that just won't boot. I installed XP on a different HD, slipped that into the removeable drive, and everything worked fine. The BIOS recognizes all the drives, and the bogus drive is recognized as a slave. Regarding the bogus drive, Windows says that it doesn't contain a valid partition...hmmm...
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Originally posted by Philip O'Keefe:

when you have the "bad" drive set as a slave, BIOS recognises it, but you can not access it in Windows, correct? If you CAN access it in Windows, start by doing a defrag on it.

If you have anything important on it try saving it before defragging,Iv'e had some bad experiences trying to defrag drives on their last legs.It's also possible that if the drive is formatted with NTFS instead of FAT,you caould have developed a bad sector which NTFS automatically flags off and makes unaccessable in which case you'll have no choice but to reformatt unfortunately.If you have a floppy that came with the drive you could always check the sectors or anything else that way,if you don't they usually have a downloadable utility on the mfgr's web site.Sometimes these utilities can actually repair bad sectors,but one way or the other,at least you'll know.
"A Robot Playing Trumpet Blows"
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Originally posted by Anderton:

Is there some way to write just the boot record/sector/whatever to restore that section of the disk? I tried fdisk/mbr but it didn't seem to do anything.

Well,you can create a boot sector repair disk by inserting your Win XP disk and boot up with it going through the early motions of reinstalling it,then when you get to the first menu select "R" for repair,From the next menu, select only Inspect boot sector (to check the boot sector for damaged) then follow the promts.Again though,if it's formatted with NTFS and the boot sector is corrupted or whatever by sector damage,it might be flagged off and unavailibe to Windows for any repair,but if it's just a boot corruption you might be able to repair it.Good luck.
"A Robot Playing Trumpet Blows"
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Originally posted by Anderton:

The BIOS recognizes all the drives, and the bogus drive is recognized as a slave . Regarding the bogus drive, Windows says that it doesn't contain a valid partition...hmmm...

"and the bogus drive is recognized as a slave"

 

is this SLAVE drive, the one with the Windows who does not start up?

 

Initially, did you forget to make a primary partition on the first physical hard disk (Disk 0) on the new drive?

 

-

-Peace, Love, and Potahhhhto
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Before you can install an operating system, you must first create a primary partition on the first physical hard disk (Disk 0) on your computer, and then format a file system on that partition. This partition is named the System partition. Alternatively, you can create a separate partition for the operating system on any physical hard disk. This is named the startup partition. The System partition on Disk 0 can also be used as a startup partition
-Peace, Love, and Potahhhhto
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IDE/ATA Configuration Jumpers

 

IDE/ATA hard disks are fairly standard in terms of jumpers. There are usually only a few and they don't vary greatly from drive to drive. Here are the jumpers you will normally find:

 

Drive Select:

Since there can be two drives (master and slave) on the same IDE channel, a jumpers is normally used to tell each drive if it should function as a master or slave on the IDE channel. For a single drive on a channel, most manufacturers instruct that the drive be jumpered as master, while some manufacturers (notably Western Digital) have a separate setting for a single drive as opposed to a master on a channel with a slave. The terms "master" and "slave" are misleading since the drives really have no operational relationship.

 

Slave Present:

Some drives have an additional jumper that is used to tell a drive configured as master that there is also a slave drive on the ATA channel. This is only required for some older drives that don't support standard master/slave IDE channel signaling.

 

Cable Select:

Some configurations use a special cable to determine which drive is master and which is slave, and when this system is used a cable select jumper is normally enabled.

 

Size Restriction Jumper

Some larger hard disk drives don't work properly in older PCs that don't have a BIOS program modern enough to recognize them. To get around this, some drives have special jumpers that, when set, will cause them to appear as a smaller size than they really are to the BIOS, for compatibility. For example, some 2.5 GB hard disks have a jumper that will cause them to appear as a 2.1 GB hard disk to a system that won't support anything over 2.1 GB. These are also sometimes called capacity limitation jumpers and vary from manufacturer to manufacturer.

-Peace, Love, and Potahhhhto
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