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What degree do analog guys have?


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We know that people working on digital stuff are electronic engineers, computer programmers, and audio engineers... What degree do analog guys (like Dr moog having a PhD in physics) have or have to have? anyone knows about rupert neve?
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Any good Electrical Engineering degree (BSEE) should have all the bases covered when it comes to analog and digital. The course curriculum should spell out what is covered.

 

My course covered AM/FM using all tubes! It made sense, since the theory is the same with solid state or tubes (just the values of signals are different and sometimes reversed). The practicality is in the fact that a lot of radio stations still have A LOT of tubes in their transmisson finals.

 

Some programs and schools can empasize certain things, too. Tailoring your choice in electives can expose you to just about anything you like. Many recent grads are a bit lacking in analog, though.

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I have an Associates in Electronics Engineering Technology. And about 35 credits towards a BSEE, though I doubt I'll ever get around to finishing that... Maybe after the last of our kids moves out or something...

 

But it's just paper, sitting in a box in the basement. What you do after you get it is what matters!

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What degree do analog guys (like Dr moog having a PhD in physics) have or have to have?
A lot of the really good ones have gold records and stuff... just as good as a degree I'd think.

William F. Turner

Songwriter

turnersongs

 

Sometimes the truth is rude...

tough shit... get used to it.

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Originally posted by Prague:

Originally posted by WFTurner:

...A lot of the really good ones have gold records and stuff...just as good as a degree I'd think

One really has little to do with the other.
I think the point is that a lot of the really "old school" audio engineering guys didn't have a formal education or degree. Sure, some do / did, but many came up under a completely different system. One of apprenticeship, as opposed to a formal university degree program. :)
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School of hard knocks..

 

No really,

 

I attended an apprentice program at the local U when I was in 9th grade high school in broadcasting and then technical. By the 10th grade (driving age) we would do evening sessions at all the local radio stations in calibration and I was very active in the recording of all of the local school systems (4 counties) band concerts..even when on stage with my Schools band. Marching band contests as well.

 

I build damned near every loudspeaker for playback in the Band rooms during this time. It was fun!!! (Acoustics as well)

 

When I received my Music scholorship, my Minor was EE and then I went on the road...playing and recording. Next thing I knew, I was teaching (invited to teach) and I never really finsihed all of the programs because I was thrown into curriculum developement. This was late 70's and everything I am sure has changed.

 

Back then...if you had the goods, you got shoved up the ladder high..whether you had the paper or not. A huge vacuum for the skils I obtained was ready to be filled and I did so.

 

Strange but true.

 

I can honestly say, when I am hands on..I am in class. I learn daily.

Bill Roberts Precision Mastering

-----------Since 1975-----------

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A lot of the really good ones have gold records and stuff... just as good as a degree I'd think.

Could be, but I dissagree. I have heard bullcrap engineering get the gold and platnium and especially of late. I also think credits, although a measure of experience and quantity, have no merit what so ever..on quality.

 

The bottom Doctoral graduate is still called a Doctor.

 

I have well over 1700 projects and the credits are not there. When you see a national advertisement, and it is killer, where are the credits?

 

Exactly.

 

So the industry and sales and the credits have little to do with raw talent, experience or quality level of the productions.

Bill Roberts Precision Mastering

-----------Since 1975-----------

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I can honestly say, when I am hands on..I am in class. I learn daily.

 

With or without a degree, IMO, this ongoing education and learning is CRUCIAL, and a key element for success. :thu:

 

IOW, I feel it is a mistake to think that once you have the sheepskin, your education is finished. On the contrary, IMO, it's just getting started. :)

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A very witty Professor once told me in class, "Bill you are here to learn how to learn, the true learning comes from the field. College educators lose sight of this and for that, it can become quite confusing"

 

I memorized that quote and I use it whenever it comes to mind, topic wise.

 

I think what sparked it...was when I busted ass in class to get a 3.2 and I said, What good is all of this?

 

 

Ahhh (insert edit)

 

I remember his other quote to me:

 

"50% of this entire experience is (comes down to) social skills"

Bill Roberts Precision Mastering

-----------Since 1975-----------

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Originally posted by Philip O'Keefe:

[qb]IOW, I feel it is a mistake to think that once you have the sheepskin, your education is finished. On the contrary, IMO, it's just getting started. :)

Well said. While stationed at Grand Forks AFB my Technical Engineering flight had four lieutenants (all with EE degrees) and five senior NCOs (maybe an Associates degree) and how well they could troubleshoot, design, reprogram or even run an oscilloscope had little to do with the degree.

 

All else being equal, a degree is better than no degree... but... all else is never equal!

 

I believe Bob Carver does not have a degree, and it'd be cool to know the "formal" education of guys like Bob Moog, Craig Anderton, and Dave Smith.

Botch

"Eccentric language often is symptomatic of peculiar thinking" - George Will

www.puddlestone.net

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I once worked for a near-legendary radio-frequency amplifier designer (well, he was definitely a legend in his own mind). An analog guy who was designing his first digital circuits when I took my silver parachute out the back end.

 

He had dropped out of an Electronic Engineering program (at Loyola Marymount in LA, as I recall).

 

He was an extremely impatient guy and college classes apparently could not hold his interest. But that same impatience impacted a lot of his ventures -- and definitely affected the design and testing process. A lot of our high end custom clients had to put up with a whole lotta BS... but the boss was the goto guy for weird high frequency amp designs.

 

(We sold to high end research facilities at Hughes, Rockewell, etc -- as well as lowballing high-power, low-cost repeater amps to Billy Bob and Clem out there in CB land -- it was one weird gig.)

 

 

One of my database pals was just telling me how the firm had to let go a young programmer. He had what appeared to be a fine education from a top school in CSE. If he was shown just what to do -- he could do it like aces.

 

But the design work most small firms have to do requires the same kind of flexibility, creativity and innovation that circuit design engineers -- or for that matter recording engineers -- have to have.

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Botch, as you well know, it's a classic butterbar mistake. How many second louies have you met who thought they knew it all? There's a reason these kids get paired up with seasoned and experienced NCO's. It's part of the learning process.
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I'm 25 and I just completed my first year towards my electronics associates degree at a local community college. I'm lucky because one of the instructors is a baby boomer age guy who used to build fuzz boxes back in the 60's when he was going to school.

 

I think that formal education can be very valuable. Having someone who is experienced to give feedback on a project you're working on can mean the difference between it working or not working. You can get a lot of information from books, but it only takes one little mistake for a circuit to not work.

 

Also, in designing new circuits, having an experienced instructor to ask what modifications would or would not work can open up much larger possibilities.

 

I think what Blue Strat told me one time sums it up for most people, "You can still build stuff without a formal education, but with a formal education you can build a lot of stuff."

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