Jump to content
Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

OT - TEDSTER: storm question


Recommended Posts

Say, I'm looking at radar loop. In Oklahoma, heavy thunderstorms are moving southeasterly. Except in the NE corner, there is a group moving Northwesterly. If two bigass thunderstorms run into one another, what happens? Does that happen?

 

That's odd that the lines are not moving in the same direction.

 

Storms in Arkansas are drifting westerly. In central Louisiana, southwesterly. All over the place.

 

There's one bad boy east of Lubbock, Texas. Might be a tornado there?

> > > [ Live! ] < < <

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 8
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Different things affect thunderstorm movement. You can have advection...basically movement with the winds...but, there are surface winds and winds aloft. Rain induced outflow from the bases of thunderstorms produces gust fronts...or outflow boundaries. If two thunderstorm cells are separated by a distance, it's quite possible that the convergence of outflow boundaries will give birth to another cell.

 

Propagation is another factor in thunderstorm movement. Propagation basically means "new cell generation"...so, in some cases, although the cells may be moving, say, in an easterly direction, if new cell development is on the western flank, and the eastward edge of cells is dying off, the storms can appear to be stationary, or even appear to be moving in an opposite direction to the prevailing wind. Different things can affect propagation of new cells, diffluence aloft (spreading out of air at the top of the thunderstorm enhancing vertical motion), surface convergence, available moisture and instability, all sorts of things.

 

Let me see if I can find an online quick-and-dirty reference for ya...

"Cisco Kid, was a friend of mine"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

To really get a picture of what is going on here, you would do a mesoanalysis of surface pressure, winds, dewpoint...and the same thing for upper levels. You might do a search of http://weather.gov and see if you can find analyses for sfc, 850, 700, 500, and 250 mb...

 

That should show a good boundary with southeasterly inflow ahead of it in the northeastern corner of OK.

"Cisco Kid, was a friend of mine"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do a google on "outflow boundaries"...

 

One of the keys to remember is that thunderstorms are not a "thing", they're a "process"...storm cells grow and decay in a given order.

"Cisco Kid, was a friend of mine"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ted,

 

All the time i see in weather forecasts on t.v. and such with the satellite imagery gigantic letter "H" and "L" wreaking all sorts of crazy carnage across the continent. If these things are like 25% the size of Oklahoma, how do they remain invisible from the ground? Are they riding atop the cloud cover?

 

Also, when we have T-Storms, how come there is so much more water to Ts? I've gone out and captured a bunch of the precipitation but i never seem to catch any T. Are the Ts very small, rare, or can they climb out of the coffee can once they land?

Dr. Seuss: The Original White Rapper

.

WWND?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...