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What's it all about? I don't get it. You got the crazy people doin the road rage. You got the fashion people looking down on you if your outfit isn't worth 2 grand. You got the awful stinky air. You got the drive by shootings. You got the doubled and tripled apartment and housing costs. You got the drive for an hour or 2 to work. You got the livin 10 feet away from the neighbour who you've never even met. You got the people not even looking at each other let alone being friendly. What is the attraction. Isn't there enough room out in the country for everyone. Why do people feel the need to huddle up in one big cluster and suffocate each other. I understand that certain jobs etc are in city centers but, usually those jobs are taken by people who are making someone else a bunch of money.And the person makin the bucks has a big place in the country! Not critcizing, just wonderin'. :p
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Greetings, Long time reader, first time poster. Wanted to chime in on this one, just had an interesting conversation about this topic a few minutes ago... FYI, I'm refering to Brooklyn, NY below, also spend some time in Danbury CT, but BK is where it's at.... You got the crazy people doin the road rage. Agreed, but city drivers merge much better than country drivers. Better flow to traffic. You got the fashion people looking down on you if your outfit isn't worth 2 grand. Not true in NY. A lot of the best nights are when you go out in Kostanza wear (i.e. fleece, sweats, velvet), and realize that you're having a much better time than everyone else. You got the awful stinky air. 10 year+ nicotine addict, no difference. You got the drive by shootings. Maybe in Cali, most people walk or train in NY. You got the doubled and tripled apartment and housing costs. True, but the convenience for snacks and entertainment around the clock is unparalleled. You got the drive for an hour or 2 to work. Yup, one hour drive to Stamford CT, but it's a reverse commute, got my tunes, got my talk radio, coffee, banana, etc. You got the livin 10 feet away from the neighbour who you've never even met. Better that way, no random idiots in your business talking shit about your personal life. Sometimes they do f with each other, I've seen it, but the incognito style seems much more tranquil. Hang with who you want to, not who you live next door to. You got the people not even looking at each other let alone being friendly. Not sure about other major cities, but you get the occasional glances and smiles from strangers in certain neighborhoods. People in NYC are very friendly once you get over the initial intimidation factor. Definitely a bit overwhelming at first, but people tend to be pretty genuine and friendly. What is the attraction. Isn't there enough room out in the country for everyone. There is, but what about great music, great food, big parties. Immeasurable amount of choices all the time. Also, you can basically find anything you want at any point in time at a decent price (unless you're a foreign tourist, then expect to pay 3 to 4 times market price) Why do people feel the need to huddle up in one big cluster and suffocate each other. We're social, we have similar interests, nice distractions, very entertaining.... I understand that certain jobs etc are in city centers but, usually those jobs are taken by people who are making someone else a bunch of money.And the person makin the bucks has a big place in the country! Yeah, I'd agree with this, but that's business for you..... Anyways, appreciate hopping onto the forum for a minute, also wanted to say hello to Craig. I know him from my SP12 turbo manual where he badmouths the external commodore floppy drive. Farewell city and country dwellers, The Dahkter
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You got the crazy people doin the road rage. True, but I know DC and NY both have more than adequate subways for times when traffic's the worst You got the fashion people looking down on you if your outfit isn't worth 2 grand. Depends on who you surround yourself with. You got the awful stinky air. Have you ever smelled the air in Pennsylvania around the mushroom farms? You got the drive by shootings. This rarely happens. And even when it does, it usually isn't in the part of town sensible people are in. You got the drive for an hour or 2 to work. See first response You got the livin 10 feet away from the neighbour who you've never even met. You're telling me there aren't people in the suburbs that don't really know their neighbor(s)? And then again, if they know you, they can talk smack about you. You got the people not even looking at each other let alone being friendly. Well I guess you've never lived in a city or you'd have experienced those exact kind of people.
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I like a huge selection of restaurants to choose from, live entertainment, people watching, libraries, and the shopping that you get in the city. I don't work so I don't have to spend too much time on the freeways. There haven't been any drive by shootings where I live....I live in a quiet suburb. The only thing I don't like about living in the city is traffic and congestion. If I ever move to a small town it will be because of those reasons. Right now, I have the Cuyamaca Mountains a half an hour away, and the beachs and surfing 20 minutes away, and downtown is only 15 minutes away. I would love to live in the country, but I have a lot of variety available to me right now. I'm going to England for two weeks vacation in April, so I've been thinking about something similar to this topic. I'm having to decide how much time to allocate to exploring a big city like London, and how much time do I devote to seeing the countryside and other places of interest.
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[quote]Originally posted by halljams: [b]What's it all about? I don't get it. You got the crazy people doin the road rage. You got the fashion people looking down on you if your outfit isn't worth 2 grand. You got the awful stinky air. You got the drive by shootings. You got the doubled and tripled apartment and housing costs. You got the drive for an hour or 2 to work. You got the livin 10 feet away from the neighbour who you've never even met. You got the people not even looking at each other let alone being friendly. What is the attraction. Isn't there enough room out in the country for everyone. Why do people feel the need to huddle up in one big cluster and suffocate each other. I understand that certain jobs etc are in city centers but, usually those jobs are taken by people who are making someone else a bunch of money.And the person makin the bucks has a big place in the country! Not critcizing, just wonderin'. :p [/b][/quote] Nasty Air and Road Rage do suck but I can live with those things...at least normal people aren't outnumbered by Conservative Christian wackos who have some bizarre need to tell everyone how to live. Another plus to living in or near a big city is you no longer have to listen to endless smalltalk about nothing in particular or "how much city folk think they're better than us". - I only have a 10 minute drive to work with no traffic. - Yes my house was way too expensive...but it's only going up in value, by a lot! - My neighbors are cool...there is one dude I kinda avoid The Entertainment rules. I love LA!
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[quote]Originally posted by halljams: [b]What's it all about? What is the attraction. Isn't there enough room out in the country for everyone. :p [/b][/quote] It looks like there's only room around Whitehorse. Did you see that Jan. 14th link by Cereal to a picture of North America? Everybody but Al-Qaeda has their lights on.
It's OK to tempt fate. Just don't drop your drawers and moon her.
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[quote]Originally posted by halljams: [b]You got the awful stinky air. [/b][/quote] this reminds me of driving to vancouver.. outside the city are a bunch of farms and the place reaks of crap, when you get into the city your damn happy to get out of the "fresh country" air! :D
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Hey, not quite! I've been in San Francisco the past 7 years, and: Commute to Daly City to work: 5 minutes each way Smog? Are you kidding? We don't have any. High rent apartments? Yeah, I admit it's insane. Glamour, etc.: not much $ for clothes after paying the rent! Road Rage: we all love each other and wear flowers in our hair I'm originally from a small town and may return one day, but for now, I'm enjoying life in the big city!
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I live in Philadelphia. My great-great-granddaddy moved here from Bavaria in the early 1800's, and so here I am too. In Philly, you can walk everywhere, and the walks are nice: cobblestone streets thick with trees, friendly people, outdoor cafes, ethnically diverse, cheap rents, historic buildings dating to the foundations of the nation, cool clubs that you don't have to stand in line to get into; lots of talented musicians, artists, and DJ's; street festivals and block parties on an almost weekly basis during the spring and summer months; Fairmount Park - the biggest inner-city park in the world, where you can ride your bike, walk, run, rollerblade or push your kids in the stroller for hours in the most idyllic settings you could possibly imagine; live jazz at Zanzibar Blue, Ortlieb's Jazz Hous, Chris' Jazz Cafe, Bar Noir, Bob & Barbara's; Monday night jam sessions at Fergie's Pub, and First Friday celebrations in the olde city gallery district that are like huge multi-block outdoor parties throughout the entire neighborhood drawing thousands to the art-gallery opening-night receptions, and augmented by free live concerts at Turtle Studios (where I get my recordings mastered)... ...the Pennsylvania Ballet, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Koresh Dance Company, PhilaDanCo, the Fringe Festival; the Wilma, Walnut Street, Merriam, Drake, Annenberg and Mandell Theaters, just to name a few... ...the Sixers, the Phillies, the Flyers, the Eagles; Rittenhouse Square, Penn's Landing, Washington Square, Logan Circle, Benjamin Franklin Parkway, FDR Park; the Dad-Vail Regatta on the Schukyll River, the Mellon Cycling Championship, the Rittenhouse Row Culinary Festival; the Philadelphia Art Museum, the Rodin Museum, the Academy Of Natural Sciences, the Please-Touch Museum, the SeaPort Museum, the Norman Rockwell Museum, the Library Company, the Afro-American Cultural Museum, the Betsy Ross House... ...transit strikes, mafia hits, gang wars, corrupt cops, street hustlers - yeah, that's all here too. That sh*t don't bother me, though. The city - it's all here, man. I'm stayin. Eric :)

Eric Vincent (ASCAP)

www.curvedominant.com

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I'm a block from the Metro North/Amtrak line...four blocks from the NYC subway, NYC's biggest park is 1/4 mile from my base, where I can go horse back riding, Tibbets brook park is up the street...pool in the summer, ice skating up on Central Av in the winter...Coyne Park Pistol & Rifle Range less than 1/4 mile away...7 minute walk (525 metres, but hey, who's checking?) to my office...on my street, on my side of the street... Pizza, Chinese food, Itilian restuarant on the corner, two supermarkets and three deli's within that same 550M radius... Know all my neighbours, everybody's friendly (except for apt 5E, I think he has dementia)... Block parties up the wazoo, excellent public & private schools within that same 550M radius...little league baseball & soccer. Adult soccer, tennis, basket ball, four Bocchi (spelling?) courts, hand ball, racquet ball..close proximity to Orchard Beach, close to Glen Island Park (New Rochelle) DSL & cable at home and work, microwave (10mbps) uplink between home & work (cuz I'm crazy like that.... :D )...theatre, cinema, Carvel ice cream... [b]Home Depot{/b] ;) for all those handy man projects... being able t ohave apt #1B or A or D pick up my mail/UPS/fed ex if I'm out.....low maintainance (common) charges...ridiculous (as in low) mortgage...near to moms & pops, and bro & sis... near enuffto the airports for all those trips I take, far enuff away so that when I open my windows, all I see are trees (dwellings only populate one side of the street...) need more? NYC Drew
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[quote]Originally posted by Steve LeBlanc: [b]...at least normal people aren't outnumbered by Conservative Christian wackos who have some bizarre need to tell everyone how to live.[/b][/quote] Yeah, I'm sure you [i]never[/i] get that in LA, right? :rolleyes: ;) Easy, brother. I think one thread on that subject is [i]quite[/i] enough! Besides, a "normal" person is just someone you don't know very well! :D I live in Las Vegas simply because that's where the live music work is. I have no love for the city, other than the convenience of being able to buy anything I want without having to drive very far. I much prefer the more laid-back lifestyle of the medium-sized Midwest town I'm from. The most obvious cultural flaw I see here stems from the fact that Vegas is such a tourist-oriented city. Too many people who live here have developed an attitude like "I don't know you and will probably never see you again, so what do I care if you think I'm an asshole." They tend to be civil only when it benefits them to do so. I'm looking forward to the day when broadband networking enables us to work for the city, without having to live [i]in[/i] the city! Peace all, Steve

><>

Steve

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Yeah, I love L.A. also. But not all of it. I only like living in only 1 part of L.A. (has that kinda S.F. vibe/look to it). When your in a big city like L.A., there is usually sweet style/spot to live in for just about anyone. If you really want a real big city lifestyle, N.Y. is where it's at. [quote] You got the crazy people doin the road rage. You got the fashion people looking down on you if your outfit isn't worth 2 grand. You got the awful stinky air. You got the drive by shootings. You got the doubled and tripled apartment and housing costs. You got the drive for an hour or 2 to work. You got the livin 10 feet away from the neighbour who you've never even met. You got the people not even looking at each other let alone being friendly. [/quote] Not really on most of this stuff for myself. As for the drive by's...they do happen sometimes, but 99% of them are directed at gangbangers...in tough 'hoods. I'll tell you what we don't have to worry about in L.A: No Tornado's No Hurricanes No Big Floods No "Good 'ol Boys" Less discrimination...more tolerance Etc. The only thing I don't like about being in L.A.? We are a more likely terrorist target. Flea Man
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[quote]Yeah, I'm sure you never get that in LA, right? Easy, brother. I think one thread on that subject is quite enough! Besides, a "normal" person is just someone you don't know very well![/quote] Well, the exact type of Christian Wacko I was referring to is pretty rare out here...not that they aren't here...I just never see them. They're ALL OVER the south and pretty common anywhere rural. My next door neighbor is Lutheran...he's studying now to be a Pastor...we get along great. He knows I'm an atheist, that I work in the Porn industry...we respect each others different beliefs and even have fun talks about those differences sometimes. I've also met some wacko Lutherans...there's less of them in Los Angeles though, I'm sure of it. :D Anyway...I was just casually commenting on that because it's a major part of what made me move away from the south. I agree we DON'T need another crazy religious thread.
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[quote]Originally posted by Steve LeBlanc: [b] I work in the Porn industry....[/b][/quote] WHAT???? :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: No, lets leave it and start another thread for that. That would be a great great thread!!! Thanks so much everyone for the fabulous descriptions of the places you live. I enjoyed reading all of them along with the enthusiasm they were described with. Keep'em comin!! Eric, i had no idea Philly was so hip. So maby you can describe the meaning of the joke in Woody Allens' Manhattan, where Diane Keaton keeps saying,"Well,you know, i'm from Philadelphia" Have you seen it? Cheers all.
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[quote]Originally posted by Steve LeBlanc: [b] What are you new? :) Actually, let's not start a new thread on that...it's been done before. It might lower your blood pressure a bit to know I'm not an actor :D , I do webdesign and other semi-techy stuff. [ 01-16-2002: Message edited by: Steve LeBlanc ][/b][/quote] Actually i was looking for work. ;)
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Well, well, if this isn't just the sort of tussle I'm going through these days. Is NYC worth it? I love the west, I love the desert, I adore the fresh, clean air, I love the sunrises and sunsets, I love being surrounded by natural beauty, and there are many places out there that offer that. But I also love the intellectual life here, the social acceptance and freedom of NYC, its incredible, unbelievable variety and the wealth of experiences I could have gotten in few other places on planet Earth. One thing the country folk never can quite seem to grasp is the dynamism of a great city. (And I'm fairly country folk myself, btw, having come here a little more than a decade ago from Dallas.) It's not the [b]number[/b] of people per se, you have bajillions of people in Phoenix after all. I think it may have something to do with the [b]concentration[/b]. In Phoenix, and in most any town west of the Mississippi, more people just means you build [b]out[/b]. Just slap on more suburbia and more strip malls and more freeways and yadda, yadda, there's your big city. IMHO, you just don't get any personality -- or much of anything that makes a real city vibrant and alive -- that way. You just get more of the same. But one of the [b]great[/b] cities forces you to build [b]in[/b] and [b]up[/b] and man I don't have many answers but add a little time and something weird and synergistic happens and for some reason you get fascinating combinations you never dreamed could happen. Things like a Chinatown, a Greenwich Village, a Wall Street, and whatever their corrollaries are in the great cities across the world -- these are utterly unique and distinct places, each with its own population with its own point of view on life and all somehow managing to coexist. After more than a decade here I have NO idea what I'm going to see when I turn any given corner. The cultures and personalities and religions and backgrounds that cross-pollinate in this town are constantly offering up new perspectives and different ways of living, and this has enriched my life immeasurably. So you just can't go to a big city in the midwest or out west -- far coast excepted -- and be able to extrapolate what NYC [i]must[/i] be like, as I once thought was possible. On the other hand, I grew up in a place that had [i]sky[/i], and sky is rare here, and often unsatisfying once found. I grew up in a place with a horizon. I grew up in a place with more civility between individuals, and yes New York City is far nicer than the stereotype, but day in and day out it is still an adversarial, aggressive place in which to live. On the other hand, the midwest seems to have more than its share of, dare I say it, timidity. Folks are discouraged from wandering too far outside the herd, as it were, and unusual people tend to be treated with somewhat less civility, which is sad. Well, I suppose both stereotypes are misleading. I have no point. It's probably like most life choices. You get to choose between the apartment with the high ceilings or the apartment with the southern exposure. You need to decide which somehow means more to you, though there's no real way you can quantify. So you wind up just trying to go with the way that seems to offer more for you at the moment, even if the benefit is slight. And you have to know that either way you go you're giving up something. Isn't that just like life. Err...sorry for the length. :)
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I was born in a little town about 45 minutes east of downtown LA called Covina, and grew up mostly there and in neighboring San Dimas (Home of Bill and Ted :rolleyes: ;) ). Back in the '60's, it was pretty rural - lots of orange groves, dairies, etc. As time went on, it got far more "suburban" in nature. Well, I work in the Christian Porn industry... :eek: :D Just kidding - trying to see if you were paying attention. ;) Anyway, I now live in Riverside, which is about 60 miles to the east of LA. It's close enough that I can get into LA as needed. On average, it was taking me an hour to get into A&M / Henson last week, and about 45 minutes to get home. Of course, if traffic was bad... :rolleyes: Still in all, I'm pretty happy with where I'm at. It's semi-rural (we're zoned for horses and fruit stands on our property, if you can believe that!), we're close to Riverside (population, about 300,000 or so) and reasonably close to LA. The AIR could be cleaner (all the smog tends to blow inland on a lot of days), but all in all, things are pretty good here - kinda a "best of both worlds" thing. And no, I'd prefer to avoid another religion thread... :) [img]http://www.freakygamers.com/smilies/s2/contrib/navigator/usa.gif[/img] Phil O'Keefe Sound Sanctuary Recording Riverside CA http://www.ssrstudio.com pokeefe777@ssrstudio.com [ 01-16-2002: Message edited by: pokeefe777@msn.com ]
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Steve LeBlanc wrote: [quote] [b]He knows I'm an atheist, that I work in the Porn industry[/b][/quote] Dang, I live in L.A., am an atheist (just a belief guys, I could be wrong!), and used to do music for Porn! (actually got nominated for best music at the AVN awards about 6 years ago..didn't win :( ) Well, I guess there's probably another 500 or so more in L.A... Phil O'keefe wrote: [quote] [b]Well, I work in the Christian Porn industry... Just kidding - trying to see if you were paying attention. [/b][/quote] Lol! Actually Phil, I read some of your posts in the heated "Christian music thread" and I must say, your opinions and logic and way of life seem to be more Buddhist to me than Christian. I hope that is not an insult...I'm really trying to complement you! :) :D Flea Man
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[quote][b]It's probably like most life choices. You get to choose between the apartment with the high ceilings or the apartment with the southern exposure.[/b][/quote] Both, in Philly, at 11th & Pine Streets in the Antique Row district: $650 including utilities. Sorry for gloating. Eric :) [ 01-17-2002: Message edited by: Curve Dominant ]

Eric Vincent (ASCAP)

www.curvedominant.com

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Rent sucks, but I do tend to feel Manhattan is the greatest place on earth. When I come back to the city even if I've been away just for a few hours I get excited as soon as I see the skyline. But you know whatever makes you happy. City living puts a smile on my face, but whatever does it for you.
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[quote]posted by NYC Drew: [b]I'm a block from the Metro North/Amtrak line...four blocks from the NYC subway, NYC's biggest park is 1/4 mile from my base, where I can go horse back riding, Tibbets brook park is up the street...pool in the summer, ice skating up on Central Av in the winter...Coyne Park Pistol & Rifle Range less than 1/4 mile away...7 minute walk (525 metres, but hey, who's checking?) to my office...on my street, on my side of the street... Pizza, Chinese food, Itilian restuarant on the corner, two supermarkets and three deli's within that same 550M radius... Know all my neighbours, everybody's friendly (except for apt 5E, I think he has dementia)... Block parties up the wazoo, excellent public & private schools within that same 550M radius...little league baseball & soccer. Adult soccer, tennis, basket ball, four Bocchi (spelling?) courts, hand ball, racquet ball..close proximity to Orchard Beach, close to Glen Island Park (New Rochelle)[/b][/quote] Ahh...New York. I luv NY. Thanks for that slice of NY, Drew. Good for the soul. E :)

Eric Vincent (ASCAP)

www.curvedominant.com

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Having served in the Air Force for many years I've lived in many different places, and about the only thing I can say is that EVERY place has its good and its bad points, and what YOU make of it determines how much you enjoy it. I grew up in South Dakota; falling asleep to crickets and frogs, playing the fresh air, no crime, all good points, but I never had a chinese meal, seen a play, or developed much socially until I got to college. Dayton Ohio, I had to get used to hearing traffic all the time, but got into the club scene and really enjoyed playing. Albuquerque, the best sunsets, wonderful weather, incredible food, but having your house robbed once a year was not cool. Grand Forks ND, you never HEAR of someone getting their house robbed, except ON base! Low rent, but -30 degree winters and mosquitoes so bad in the summer you spent most of your outdoor time in the winter! Now I live in Ogden Utah, close enough to a big city, 15 minutes away from great hiking and skiing, I just have to put up with a 14% state income tax and an LDS-run state government, but I concentrate on the good things and have a good time. :)

Botch

"Eccentric language often is symptomatic of peculiar thinking" - George Will

www.puddlestone.net

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