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Question re: broadband routers and IP addresses


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Hi all,

 

This may be a dumb question, but I'm hoping someone can help me here..

 

I'm curious as to whether a broadband internet router can give two computers different outbound IP addresses. ie, if both computers were to access the same website during the same day, would the website identify them as the same computer (same IPs) or two different computers?

 

TIA,

 

Harold

meh
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Originally posted by rold:

Hi all,

 

This may be a dumb question, but I'm hoping someone can help me here..

 

I'm curious as to whether a broadband internet router can give two computers different outbound IP addresses. ie, if both computers were to access the same website during the same day, would the website identify them as the same computer (same IPs) or two different computers?

 

TIA,

 

Harold

Each computer is given a unique IP address.

Go to the command prompt on each machine and type in ipconfig. That will give you your ip configuration.

bbach

 

Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder.

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Originally posted by Doug Osborne:

The website will recognize the IP address of the router, not the individual computers.

 

If you pay for a static IP address, it will always be the same. If not, your ISP can change the IP as often as it wants, but it still will relate to the router, not the computer.

In running two computers from a router here at home, the ip address of each computer is usually very similar, but the last 3 digits are always different. For example, one might be .100 and the other .101. Pretty much the same IP, but each computer is identified uniquely.

bbach

 

Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder.

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It's not that you are wrong, but Doug is right. ;)

 

The router presents a single IP address to the web. Behind the router the computers are handed addresses on a local network like 192.168.1.100, 192.168.1.101, etc.

 

Internally they have unique addresses on a private network, externally the router is assigned a single IP by your provider.

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Let me guess...your address is 192.168.0.100? :D

 

That's your local LAN address. The router will use that to find your computer, but the outside address is assigned to the router. Basically, the router acts as the go-between - it makes all the external requests (web pages, downloads, etc) and then sorts out the responses & sends them to the appropriate PC.

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Originally posted by cwfno:

...In running two computers from a router here at home, the ip address of each computer is usually very similar, but the last 3 digits are always different. For example, one might be .100 and the other .101. Pretty much the same IP, but each computer is identified uniquely.[/QB]

Yes, uniquely identified on your LAN side. On the WAN side (the "internet", etc) it almost always ID's the IP address of the router, or the address of the router plus the port # that you connect via.

 

Some of our forumites have tag lines that say...

 

"your IP address is xxxxxxx, you are using Windows XP, Internet Explorer 6" (example only), etc etc. If you happen on one of those from both of your computers, you'll see that it displays the IP address of your router.

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Hi guys,

 

Thank you all for your input!

 

I read your responses, called the broadband provider, got a second IP address for free (apparently this modem can handle up to three), so I just saved over $450 :thu:

 

Guess the drinks are on me tonight :D

 

Apparently I just need a router or hub that can handle two incoming and outgoing IP addies and it's all good :)

 

Thanks again guys!

meh
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Hey Tedster,

 

Good to see you too!

 

I was at sea for a year, skippering and being crew on a number of various vessels to get my pro Captain's certifications.

 

Pretty much lived at different marinas and anchorages so internet was limited to whatever each marina had to offer, or email through SSB radio (almost the same as HAM radio from what I understand), so basically 1kbps or less :D

 

It's great to be back here again :)

 

Hope you and your family are well,

 

Harold :wave:

meh
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Originally posted by rold:

Hi guys,

 

Thank you all for your input!

 

I read your responses, called the broadband provider, got a second IP address for free (apparently this modem can handle up to three), so I just saved over $450 :thu:

 

Guess the drinks are on me tonight :D

 

Apparently I just need a router or hub that can handle two incoming and outgoing IP addies and it's all good :)

 

Thanks again guys!

Yep. The linksys, netgear, etc. home routers only do NAT (network address translation) which means all outbound connections will appear to have the same IP address. If your ISP assigns you a range of static routable IP addresses you can get a cheap normal router (I use a cisco 831 at home) and set it up so all your pc's have seperate IP addresses that are routable on the internet.
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