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Do you like country music? Help!


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What albums do you consider as essential MUST HAVES in the country music or country-rock genre? I'll post a couple of faves. Hard to do but I have to have: Patty Loveless - The Trouble With The Truth Red Headed Stranger - Willie Nelson Keith Whitley - Greatest Hits I have an old Merle Haggard LP that I about wore out. I don't recall the name and I don't have access to it now but it's hard to beat. Hate to list a Greatest Hits album. That might be a copout. Although, it's the only one I have. But he is GOOD. Plus... I need help with finding a couple of CDs. I recall two CDs that have been mentioned by megastar artists whom I respect as MUST HAVE CDs for those who love country music. Can't remember who the megastars were that said this... but it was something like... "You gotta have suchandsuch album by Vern Gosdin... who (I) regard as the singer's singer." Another time, a megastar said something like "Heaven to me is listening to Leeann Womack's album, suchandsuch. Pristine!" I think the Womack album was one of her first but I can't remember which one. Any idea? BTW, her last CD, "I Hope You Dance," is outstanding... that single won a Grammy.

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You know that I'm not a fan of country radio, but theres hope on the horizon with the popularity of "O'brother....", they do need to get back to their roots and shed all this positive country carbon copy foolishness. When Nashville and LA are indistinguishable.......things are bad wrong. Even the Alt scene is getting strange. But its a biz.......and thats what Johnny Public wants....are is made to think they want. Who knows? Oh by the way......who knew that Bacardi would start making pretzels??????? (wondering who will get my tasteless joke?)
Down like a dollar comin up against a yen, doin pretty good for the shape I'm in
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[quote]Originally posted by strat0124: [b]You know that I'm not a fan of country radio, but theres hope on the horizon with the popularity of "O'brother....", they do need to get back to their roots and shed all this positive country carbon copy foolishness. When Nashville and LA are indistinguishable.......things are bad wrong... [/b][/quote] Strat, there are many people who have the same opinion you do about country radio. But I really don't understand it. My musical tastes are about as varied as they get. I like rock, blues, country, bluegrass. I was rock and roll all my life until I was exposed to country in my 20s, which was in the 70s. Even then, there was still a "hickish" genre. There were exceptions. Buck Owens put out some good stuff. Merle Haggard. Conway Twitty. Etc. But there was still plenty of twangy crap with poor musicianship. Today, that's non-existent. The musicianship these days is absolutely outstanding. These cats can play. And they can sing. In the old days, there were lots of artists that were TERRIBLE singers. I don't know how in the world they ever made it. Seems that a poor voice was a prerequisite. Nowadays, country has fantastic voices. And wow, the women are knockouts! Beautiful women. Side benefit. As far as the cookie-cutter gripe, I'm not sure I understand that either. I hear lots of new songs that are just sensational to me. Incredibly catchy and well-written. I do, however, recognize some of the commercial stuff as being a bit silly. As far as the popularity of the bluegrass record "Where Are Thou"... I bought that CD recently. It doens't impress me that much. And I like bluegrass. I mean, I just don't get it... why it's so popular. It's okay but I don't understand why everyone went so nuts over it. I guess I could sum it up this way. Do you like the Eagles? Country radio offers a lot of music that is much like "Eagles music," whatever that is. It's more like the old country-rock genre. I don't like most popular music... most of the stuff young people like these days. Some of it, yes but most of it, no. So, what can I listen to? Modern country, I thoroughly enjoy it. It's taken country out of Hicksville. Just my opinion, nothing else.

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[quote]Originally posted by LiveMusic: [b]Buck Owens put out some good stuff. Merle Haggard. Conway Twitty. Etc. But there was still plenty of twangy crap with poor musicianship. [QB] They were pioneers inventing the genre......in my opinion....and twang...is a good thing! [QB]Today, that's non-existent. The musicianship these days is absolutely outstanding. These cats can play. And they can sing. In the old days, there were lots of artists that were TERRIBLE singers. I don't know how in the world they ever made it. Seems that a poor voice was a prerequisite. [QB] I think it was rural stylings...which to me is more beautiful than a T&A with voice training.....again just my opinion. [QB]Nowadays, country has fantastic voices. And wow, the women are knockouts! Beautiful women. Side benefit.[QB] It seems to me unless you look a certain way, you'll never make it today.....in the old days that wasn't as severe. [QB]As far as the cookie-cutter gripe, I'm not sure I understand that either. I hear lots of new songs that are just sensational to me. Incredibly catchy and well-written. I do, however, recognize some of the commercial stuff as being a bit silly.[QB] Agreed, however take away the singer and you can see its the same basic formula, in which you can insert any current singer in country. Brent Mason...the monster that he is, defined the licks you hear EVERY guitar player on country radio. [QB]As far as the popularity of the bluegrass record "Where Are Thou"... I bought that CD recently. It doens't impress me that much. And I like bluegrass. I mean, I just don't get it... why it's so popular. It's okay but I don't understand why everyone went so nuts over it.[QB] Because of its purity, or impression of purity........I grew up with my grandfathers albums of Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter family....so if you go to the root and understand and enjoy it...you'll see. :) [QB]I guess I could sum it up this way. Do you like the Eagles? Country radio offers a lot of music that is much like "Eagles music," whatever that is. It's more like the old country-rock genre. I don't like most popular music... most of the stuff young people like these days. Some of it, yes but most of it, no. So, what can I listen to? Modern country, I thoroughly enjoy it. It's taken country out of Hicksville.[QB] Which to me killed it......though I like the Eagles, I was more into Burrito's, Jerry Jeff, New Riders, Asleep at the Wheel, Goose Creek Symphony, Old Waylon and Willie, and old Hank Jr. as well as the older honky tonkers I grew up with. Just my opinion, nothing else.[/b][/quote] Hey man, I'm with you.....I used to live in Tangipahoa....so we share alot more in common than you might expect.
Down like a dollar comin up against a yen, doin pretty good for the shape I'm in
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Hmm, Duke, I feel exactly the opposite about country. I felt there was great singing and musicianship on many of the old records, while "modern country" just sounds too slick and manufactured and I can't listen to it. C'mon, you gonna tell me that for example, Emmylou Harris' "Luxury Liner" wasn't an incredible record with incredible singing and musicianship? Albert Lee... holy cow. Gram Parsons' solo stuff, as well as his work with the Flying Burrito Bros., is really standout as well. Incredible women? Emmylou, Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn, Tammy Wynette... Non-purist country-rock? How about Wilco, Son Volt, or old Linda Ronstadt. I'll take that over country-shlock radio any day. And no, I never was an Eagles fan. :D --Lee
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[quote]Originally posted by Lee Flier: [b]Non-purist country-rock? How about Wilco, Son Volt, or old Linda Ronstadt. I'll take that over country-shlock radio any day.--Lee[/b][/quote] A lady after my own heart...... Try the AM dial on your radio late at night....sometimes some super pure early 60's and late 50's country.....gimme some twang!!!!!!!
Down like a dollar comin up against a yen, doin pretty good for the shape I'm in
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[quote]Originally posted by Lee Flier: [b]Hmm, Duke, I feel exactly the opposite about country. I felt there was great singing and musicianship on many of the old records, while "modern country" just sounds too slick and manufactured and I can't listen to it. C'mon, you gonna tell me that for example, Emmylou Harris' "Luxury Liner" wasn't an incredible record with incredible singing and musicianship? Albert Lee... holy cow. Gram Parsons' solo stuff, as well as his work with the Flying Burrito Bros., is really standout as well. Incredible women? Emmylou, Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn, Tammy Wynette... --Lee[/b][/quote] Uh... c'mon. I didn't say that. I didn't say all old country music was hicksville or had poor musicianship. I said some of it was. And the people you mentioned as revering, hey, I'm in your camp. I didn't say anything contrary. I just said that old style country had a lot of twangy, hicksville sounding stuff. And by twangy, I mean twangy voices, not twangy guitars. Twangy guitars are good. But some of the country singers of old... NONE of the ones you mentioned, were HORRIBLE. I honestly do not know how they made it. They wouldn't stand a chance today. I'm kinda blank right now but a couple that come to mind are Roy Acuff and Ernest Tubbs. Acuff more than Tubbs. There are better examples but I can't think of them right now. Roy Acuff couldn't get even a look today with that voice. BTW, Tammy Wynette... now, that's country. I love Tammy Wynette. What a unique country voice. And I love George Jones. Another VERY unique country voice. I love old country. But I love the new country, too. In the past couple of weeks, I bought a 4-CD set entitled "Roots of Country." We're talkin' back to the very beginning... 1930s or so. Very interesting. But a full dose of that for more than a quick listen? Puhleeze. When it gets up past 1950, I start tolerating it. I also bought a Tennessee Ernie Ford CD. How many people do you know that would do that? ;) But as far bashing modern country as being "bad" or whatever, I just don't understand how you guys can hate it across the board. Even your cookie cutter artists. A good song is a good song. So, what is a good song? I don't say you're wrong, I just say I don't understand it. Because these pickers and singers are really good and the songs tell incredible stories. BTW, I bought Rodney Crowell's latest CD, "Houston Kid." Wow, that is a terrific CD. And yes, it is different from modern country. I'd bet you would really like it. He's not mainstream country now (mainly because he's too 'old" I guess) but at one time, he was right in the thick of it. But I'd bet you would really like it. It's excellent. Emotional, poignant. His ex-father-in-law is Johnny Cash. Cash sings on one song. I guess people who bash modern country would bash all of Trace Adkins' work since he's one of the top guns. Man, I just love this guy's music. What a voice! Alan Jackson, George Strait, Mark Chesnutt, many others. I love it. Trick Pony... that's commercialized as hell but I _really_ dig it. Damn near anything Patty Loveless or Leeann Womack record, I like. Oh gosh, even a lot of JoDee Messina's work. Nickel Creek, Dixie Chicks. It goes on and on. Hey, I guess I'm easy. Oh and Heaven forbid... I even like a lot of Shania Twain's music. No joke, I really do. Of course, I am a big Eric Clapton fan and have been lambasted on this board for that, too. Many times, it seems if an artist is successful, that means they're no good, according to some people. Not saying you, Lee... just a comment.

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A student brought a cd in by a guy named "Chris Cagle" I think.. (Just looked at CDNOW to make sure I don't offend anyone obvious that may be around here...) (geez, they list a Daryl Ann for his "Hairstylist, makeup"... hahahahaha! Now THAT'S reeeeal kun-trih! HAHAHAHAH!) Ahem.... Anyhow, listening to the first song - it's basically 80's metal without the hot rodded Marshall sound; it's like the Mutt Lange/Shania trip but taken even that much closer to the 80's metal angle. It's so just *barely* country sounding it's quite remarkable. Man, the guy has a MAKEUP ARTIST.....? What would Johnny Cash say about THAT?????

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[quote]Originally posted by Chip McDonald: [b](geez, they list a Daryl Ann for his "Hairstylist, makeup"... hahahahaha! Now THAT'S reeeeal kun-trih! HAHAHAHAH!) Ahem.... Man, the guy has a MAKEUP ARTIST.....? What would Johnny Cash say about THAT?????[/b][/quote] Heehee, pretty funny. The guys these days... it's real big business. The guys in the old days of country... my appreciation is that they made very little money. Most struggled to eake out a living. Today, 'nother story. Sexuality plays a huge role. Uh... mabye "sensuality" is a better word. I guess the video changed things. BTW, I think someone made a comment in this thread that you gotta be a pretty boy to make it in modern country. There are plenty of new male stars that the girls go nuts over and you might think that it's "required" but there are plenty of guys that enter the business these days that are NOT handsome. AT ALL.

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You have to listen to Roy Acuff when he was a young man.....good tunage. Same with Ernest Tubb and others.....excellent stuff. Take a listen to Uncle Tupelo's "Anodyne" and you'll see references and nods to all the oldies that sound "old timey and twangy" to you. Not knocking you....just stating my case.
Down like a dollar comin up against a yen, doin pretty good for the shape I'm in
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Hey Duke, I've always dug Rodney Crowell. Steve Earle and Ricky Skaggs too. And yeah, George Jones. And George Strait. But I never minded Roy Acuff's voice either. :D Then again, I've never been able to listen to ANY country nonstop. There's a lot of it I like and have always liked, but I don't listen to it religiously like I do with all my fave rock artists. But that's just my taste. I agree that a good song is a good song, but bad production can bury a good song, and what I really can't stand about most modern country is the production. When I listened to country music the most was in the 70's, and even the top 40 country at that time was extremely well produced for the most part. There was still some stuff that was too slick for my taste - I mean if I heard the Eagles' "Lyin' Eyes" one more time on a top 40 country station I thought I was going to puke. But there was great stuff coming out then from Willie and Waylon, David Allan Coe, Conway Twitty, Emmylou, Tammy, Dolly, etc. These artists were all very successful but I felt they were genuine and their records didn't sound like they were manufactured by a bunch of guys in suits. So I listened to a lot of country radio back then, because on the rock stations you had all the overblown "corporate rock" which was making me about as sick as top 40 pop and country do today. Technical prowess as a musician or producer doesn't really do anything for me - if it's not a heartfelt performance and production it just leaves me cold, even if it's a well crafted song. And nowadays I can barely stand to turn on ANY top 40 radio station be it rock, pop or country. Good thing there's Internet radio and the underground music scene, and local bands that I dig. --Lee
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I will second the Uncle Tupelo/Son Volt/Wilco recommendations. Of the 3, Son Volt would be my favorite. I'm not a huge fan of Jeff Tweedy's (Wilco) voice. I didn't notice sanyone say The Jayhawks. Great harmonies! They are veering away from country now that Mark Olson left, but I like all their stuff. Steve Earle is today's answer to Johnny Cash! Lucinda Williams is the female Steve Earle. The Mavericks: imagine Roy Orbison fronting a country band. Junior Brown: The fastest guit-steel player in the West. Surf Country! Oh, and just for fun, The Beat Farmers, Reverend Horton Heat, and Southern Culture on the Skids :D
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Leeflier wrote: [b]I agree that a good song is a good song, but bad production can bury a good song, and what I really can't stand about most modern country is the production.[/b] I guess I'm just so different. I love live albums like McCartney Live or Clapton Live. And acoustic unplugged things, I really like that. I do not like nearly as much, the raw old blues stuff where the guitar is almost out of tune and it's just real raw sounding. I tire of it real quickly. On the other hand, heavily produced stuff, I actually like it. Mutt Lange, to me, is a genius. Shania's hooked up with a good husband, didn't she, as far as music goes. Seemed to work for her. ;) [b]Waylon[/b] I saw a documentary recently about Waylon. I had no idea of his importance to country music. I mean, the revolutionary aspect. He apparently shook up their world. Basically told RCA bigshot, Chet Atkins, "It's either my way or no way. Take it or leave it." (With the prodding and foresight of his somewhat eccentric manager.) Very interesting show.

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I'll probably get flamed for my suggestions, but here goes: Eagles: On the Border - the perfect marriage of country and rock. The Byrds "Sweetheart of the Rodeo" LP should also be checked out in this category. Steve Earle: Guitar Town, Exit 0, Copperhead Road - Yeah, he can ALMOST sing, but boy can this guy write. Great production (although a bit thin) from Tony Brown. Lucinda Williams - Car Wheels on a Gravel Road - Another "almost singer" with a great band, and absolutely KILLER songs. Emmylou Harris - Luxury Liner, Elite Hotel, Quarter Moon in a Ten Cent Town - No "almost singer" here - the absolute voice on an angel, with one of the greatest bands (regardless of genre) ever assembled on record. Brian Ahern's productions are perfect for her, Albert Lee and James Burton rock, and the songs are great. Patty Loveless is great, but THIS is the lady who I look to first in country music. Dwight Yoacam - Hillbilly Deluxe, Guitars Cadillacs etc - Take THAT Nashville! Go ahead and overproduce everything if you want, as long as there's people that are willing to do "real" country, I don't care. Bakersfield country done right. Great production and quirky lead guitar by Pete Anderson, classic songs and great singing. There's tons of others, but these come instantly to mind as some of my "must have" country albums. [img]http://www.freakygamers.com/smilies/s2/contrib/navigator/usa.gif[/img] Phil O'Keefe Sound Sanctuary Recording Riverside CA http://www.ssrstudio.com pokeefe777@ssrstudio.com
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[quote]Originally posted by pokeefe777@msn.com: [b]I'll probably get flamed for my suggestions, but here goes: Steve Earle: Guitar Town, Exit 0, Copperhead Road - Yeah, he can ALMOST sing, but boy can this guy write. Great production (although a bit thin) from Tony Brown. Phil O'Keefe Sound Sanctuary Recording Riverside CA http://www.ssrstudio.com pokeefe777@ssrstudio.com[/b][/quote] Have you heard his stuff since he got out of prison about five years ago? So good it hurts!
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[quote]Originally posted by Lee Flier: [b]Hey Duke, I've always dug Rodney Crowell. Steve Earle and Ricky Skaggs too. And yeah, George Jones. And George Strait. But I never minded Roy Acuff's voice either. :D Then again, I've never been able to listen to ANY country nonstop. There's a lot of it I like and have always liked, but I don't listen to it religiously like I do with all my fave rock artists. But that's just my taste. I agree that a good song is a good song, but bad production can bury a good song, and what I really can't stand about most modern country is the production. When I listened to country music the most was in the 70's, and even the top 40 country at that time was extremely well produced for the most part. There was still some stuff that was too slick for my taste - I mean if I heard the Eagles' "Lyin' Eyes" one more time on a top 40 country station I thought I was going to puke. But there was great stuff coming out then from Willie and Waylon, David Allan Coe, Conway Twitty, Emmylou, Tammy, Dolly, etc. These artists were all very successful but I felt they were genuine and their records didn't sound like they were manufactured by a bunch of guys in suits. So I listened to a lot of country radio back then, because on the rock stations you had all the overblown "corporate rock" which was making me about as sick as top 40 pop and country do today. Technical prowess as a musician or producer doesn't really do anything for me - if it's not a heartfelt performance and production it just leaves me cold, even if it's a well crafted song. And nowadays I can barely stand to turn on ANY top 40 radio station be it rock, pop or country. Good thing there's Internet radio and the underground music scene, and local bands that I dig. --Lee[/b][/quote] Lee, once again (except for some of the Eagles comments ;) ) I'm in total agreement with you. You can add Skaggs, Crowell and Ronstadt to my list as well. [img]http://www.freakygamers.com/smilies/s2/contrib/navigator/usa.gif[/img] Phil O'Keefe Sound Sanctuary Recording Riverside CA http://www.ssrstudio.com pokeefe777@ssrstudio.com
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Country Music. Ahhh this strikes close to MY heart now! I am a writer, performer and record(er) of country music. Yes, it's true most of the garbage on radio is DRIVEL. Notice that I said MOST.. not ALL of it is crap. Some good stuff finds it's way on to the air eventually, but a large amount of good stuff never sees airplay. Whatever. Everybody has their own definition of what kind of country music they like. Here are my thoughts.... As far as country music goes, in my books you need to have the sincere FEEL of country. A few guys have this in earnest. Mark Chesnutt - This guys is about the most country voice you can find in contemporary country. SERIOUS country feel here. I can listen to him for hours. Skip the radio stuff, and listen to "his" tracks. Awesome stuff. Dwight Yoakam- Another great listen. I really enjoy his REAL country sounding stuff. He has the feel. George Jones - Oh yeah man. Now this is good. He's gettin' on, but his voice is just so distinctive. He got better with age in my opinion. He is like a wine..... Seriously, listen to tracks like "Numbers on the Jukebox" from Mark Chesnutt, the listen to country radio, you'll want to puke. I agree with one of the above posts about needing to "shed the postive country" thing. I agree stongly. There is just something about hearing those hurtin' songs with a nice steel guitar. Nothin' can touch it for me. I am currently compiling a 10 song original CD of my own songs. These guys I listed above are a big inspiriation. SH

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It's hard to know where to start on this subject. I've been living and working in the Nashville area for about 16 years now and am making a serious effort to get my stuff on country radio...the problem being that "my stuff" and "country radio" may be mutually exclusive domains. Nashville has been married to radio from day one. The country chart represents the biggest single radio format in America because the CMA (Country Music Association)has managed to prevent "genre-fication". From sea to shining sea,if you tune in a country radio station,you will hear an almost exclusively Nashville sound. But with consolidation of all those stations,Nashville is complaining that the tail is now wagging the dog. The labels say that radio will not play anything even remotely close to the inside walls of the box,much less outside of it. Radio says they only can play what Twangtown sends 'em. Doesn't seem to matter much. They may both sink together. Recently rap surpassed country in sales and now WSM radio,the home of the Grand Ole Opry,may switch to a sports format. :( Sadly to me,I have to say that country music may have become irrelevant in today's world. It celebrates a way of life that is disappearing fast. Not only the backwoods life where a Saturday night radio show was the only contact with a larger world,but the sweet,naive,hippie innocence that wanted to return to a simpler way of living and gave birth to the SoCal country of the 70's. These days Nashville has tried it's hand at fence riding. Some of the stuff is down home values,some of it is cheesecake,and some of it is just plain mixed up. The video for "I Hope You Dance" features two beautiful innocent little girls next to Leeann Womack in a dress that practically screams "LOOK AT THESE TITS!" It's equally hard to believe the word pictures of homely values and the new-found sexuality in country songs today. Ultimately,I think the buying public has decided that "hot country" is neither. This isn't to say that there's no great songs on country radio. Nashville has it's share of glory and tomfoolery just like everybody else makin'music. But [i]man[/i] what an identity crisis! later, Mike [ 01-15-2002: Message edited by: coolhouse ]
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by coolhouse: [b]It's hard to know where to start on this subject. I've been living and working in the Nashville area for about 16 years now and am making a serious effort to get my stuff on country radio...the problem being that "my stuff" and "country radio" may be mutually exclusive domains.[/b] Hey, Mike, good luck to you! That's cool to know you are going for it. [b]Sadly to me,I have to say that country music may have become irrelevant in today's world. It celebrates a way of life that is disappearing fast. Not only the backwoods life where a Saturday night radio show was the only contact with a larger world,but the sweet,naive,hippie innocence that wanted to return to a simpler way of living and gave birth to the SoCal country of the 70's. [/b] Wow, you said a lot there. Just last night, I was visiting a singer/songwriter and discussin modern country music. I told her one of the problems is "the farms are gone." I come from a farming background. My dad, my granddad were farmers. The family farm is gone. Literally. About 90% of all farmers down here are broke. As in forced into bankruptcy. VERY few are left. The world has changed and it's sad to see it go. Kids today have no idea what reality is anymore. Cows. Goats. Chickens. Dirt. Just plain old dirt. The sweet smell of newly plowed dirt. Or even the sweet smell of newly tilled dirt in the family vegetable garden. I've always thought schools should include courses in gardening and animal husbandry of some sort that would cause kids to be around nature in some way. Just basic stuff. Your entire life revolving around TV, the internet and shopping malls... wow, what are we going to produce? Nothing like memories of ol' Bessie kicking the milk pail to bring you back to what's really real. On the other hand, the country music sound... perhaps it can survive even in the techno age. After all, most country songs are about love the lack of it and that won't change.

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Hey LIVE, Good topic you picked here. I listened to a little country in the 70's, just enough to learn who the big Artists of the day were. Then there were the 80's, Alabama and Oak Ridge Boys pretty much dominated. Jones and Haggard were still there and you should even go back a little further and check out some Vern Gozden (sp?) Jim Reeves. I've been getting to record a new Porter Wagoner album this week. He's in the same bunch and at 74 years old it's great to see him still able to satisfly his earge to make new music. The first wave of "New Country" to me was when George Strait and Randy Travis came into the mix. I have ALWAYS been driven by "New Music" I'm not one who's much into the classic rock station, because I've heard all those songs tooooooooo many times. The late 80's seems like if you weren't Sheryl Crow or Hootie and the Blowfish you just didn't get any airplay, so during this period I turned to Country music as a good source for New Music. The 90's brought a whole new batch of Artists labeled as New Country and they took Country into new hights never enjoyed before. Anybody who was anybody in the 90's, now has a greatest hits CD out there. These I would think are essential. Some of my favorites were Brooks & Dunn, Tracy Lawrence, Trisha Yearwood, Patty Loveless, Clint Black, Dwight Yokem, John Anderson, Lee Roy Parnell, Ty Herndon, David Ball, The Mavericks, Martina McBride, Alan Jackson, Vince Gill, Doug Stone, Billy Dean, Diamond Rio and Collin Raye etc. Today it seems like record companies in Nashville have pretty much turned their back on the Artists of the 90's (who bought them all the fancy new buildings on Music Row) and have signed a whole new batch of youngsters. I'm having a hard time keeping up with the names of everybody new, but there's some great new stuff out there if you take the time to search for it. A few good one's that stand out are Lee Ann Womack, Keith Urban, Rascal Flatts, Gary Allen, Jolie and the Wanted, Cyndi Thompson, Jamie O'Neal, Brad Martin, Jeffery Stelle and Carolyn Dawn Johnson. Seems like the British Invation is alive and well ... the Brits moving here to enjoy a closer look at the music being made right here in the USA. enjoy :p
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[quote]Originally posted by russrags: [b]A few good one's that stand out... Jeffery Stelle[/b][/quote] Jeffrey Steele? This guy has a single out that I am nuts over. "Somethin' in the Water." Man, that song is what I call "sassy!" "Catchy!" Rockin'! What a prolific songwriter this guy is! Man, I see his name everywhere. I am always in search for good music but I especially like to find uptempo country or alt-country stuff. Does this CD have more songs like that single? BTW, I mentioned this on another thread but if you missed it, I bought Rodney Crowell's latest -- Houston Kid. This is a fantastic CD. One of the best I've heard in years. Johnny Cash, his ex-father-in-law, even sings on one song. No bad blood there, I guess. This CD is very emotional... kind of an autobiographical look at his tough life. Definitely not main-stream country. I only hope to find more music like this! I got Keith Urban's CD, too. It's good. Gotta get me a BR549 CD. BTW, my question in the original post... I have identified the Leeann Womack CD I sought... it's her debut CD entitled simply "Leeann Womack." I would have sworn she's been around longer than 1997. I figured she'd been around about ten years. Now, I gotta get her middle CD; then I'll have all three. I saw her live act just after she won her Grammy. Excellent show. Still trying to identify which Vern Gosdin CD considered the classic.

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Uh, from the 70's there was a dj at KMET in LA that had some great stuff. Jimmy Rabbit, NOT EDDIE!!!! Early Waylon & Tom Rush had some too. How about Hoyt Axton? There's just too much out there to pick and choose from. If you HAVE to have something, it's probably a good bet to go with some Hank Williams, Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, Merle Haggard, Lefty Frizzel for some of the greats. EmmyLou & Patsy too, among lots of other of the female persuasion. Go with what you like...

 

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"When you come slam bang up against trouble, it never looks half as bad if you face up to it." The Duke...

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