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making a room dead


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k im lookin for the cheapest way to do this, were turnin my drummers extra room into kind of a studio for us. i was thinking buying thick comforter blankets and stapling them to the walls would work im not sure...any ideas? its a square room (which i know is bad) at about 15x15x8.

thanks

ryan

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Why do you want it dead?

 

Because you think it will then sound better in the room...

...or, are you trying to keep the sound from getting out, and also outside noise from getting in?

 

Just making a room dead may not accomplish anything good...for either reason.

So...before you start...be specific about what you are trying to do...and why. Then you might learn the best way to go about doing it.

miroslav - miroslavmusic.com

 

"Just because it happened to you, it doesn't mean it's important."

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Scroll on down to Ethan Winer's Acoustics Forum. You will learn a lot! The kind of deadening you are talking about so far will kill they highs only- it will be dull and boomy. You need to address all frequencies, but especially bass frequencies. Ethan knows how.

A WOP BOP A LU BOP, A LOP BAM BOOM!

 

"There is nothing I regret so much as my good behavior. What demon possessed me that I behaved so well?" -Henry David Thoreau

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Ryan, there's two main areas concerning acoustics for rooms - soundproofing and interior acoustic treatment. Soundproofing requires mass - thick, heavy, decoupled walls are the only thing that will "contain" the sound within the room and prevent it from traveling to other rooms or outside. Sound treatment (acoustic treatment) can improve the sound inside of the room, but will do little or nothing to prevent sound from outside from entering, or the sound in the room from escaping.

 

Things like carpet, blankets and acoustic foam will only help with the sound inside of the room, and will do nothing for preventing sound from traveling out of the room and disturbing others, or outside sounds from getting in and getting on to your recordings. Additionally, those sorts of "soft" treatments will only affect the upper midrange and higher frequencies, and will do nothing at low frequency sounds like kick drums and bass guitars. Putting up nothing but a bunch of "soft" treatment will result in a very unbalanced sounding room - the highs will be absorbed, but the lows will boom like crazy - especially in a room with those dimensions.

 

There's a great acoustics forum here that can help with your problem. Ethan (the moderator) is a very knowledgeable cat, and he can probably give you some suggestions... but you need to let him know what your budget is and what exactly you want to be able to do in the room - is it for recording, mixing, rehersals, etc. Here's a link:

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=forum&f=26&submit=Go

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Particularly for drums and percussion, a dead room is not necessarily a good sounding recording room. Perhaps you could describe more specificially the problems you are encountering recording. It may very well be that a simple change in mic placement or kit placement will solve your dilemna.

Hope this is helpful.

 

NP Recording Studios

Analog approach to digital recording.

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Definitely check out Ethan's forum. But Where, mic placement alone won't help a 15 x 15 x 8 room's sound for drum recording. :D

 

If I may go out on a limb to assume this is simply your attempt to make the room palatable enough because it's all you have available, You'll probably do well to limit reflections around the mics with foam on or near the mic in conjunction with light application of foam to reduce some of the room reflections. If you have the budget, angling one or two walls with new drywall will rid you of the standing waves, but it sounds like you're simply looking for a lowest common denominator solution... not the ideal yet expensive addition. Yes? No?

 

You might want to try Auralex Xpanders:

 

http://www.truesoundcontrol.com/images/products/XPANDER.jpg

http://truesoundcontrol.com/images/products/XPANDER-ex3.jpg

http://truesoundcontrol.com/images/products/XPANDER-ex2.jpg

 

Xpanders allow you a high degree of isolation at the mics, which in a 15 x 15 square may be the easiest, inexpensive way to combat all but the standing waves. At around $40, the set is relatively cheap. (Acoustic treatment in your room will easily go above $40. And again... drums in a 15 x 15 room probably isn't worth the extra expense.)

 

But don't take my word on it... ask the expert. That would be Ethan.

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

Soundclick

fntstcsnd

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Originally posted by fantasticsound:

But Where, mic placement alone won't help a 15 x 15 x 8 room's sound for drum recording. .

I never said that mic placement alone would solve their problems. I'm well aware that mic placement alone does not a good drum sound make. a well tuned kit, properly placed in the room (which I also mentioned) good mics, pres and recording medium (IE properly maintained analog tape deck, good A-D converters etc...) and a top notch drummer all play vital and equal roles along with the room to recording good drum tracks.

Hope this is helpful.

 

NP Recording Studios

Analog approach to digital recording.

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Just put in a rug and some comfy furniture and call it a day. Don't put ugly stuff on the wall because what it gives you in terms of sound dampening you loose in terms of ugliness.

 

The following is good advice (I'm noting that it's good advice because on the rare occassions when I offer advice, it's usually not very good, but the following is really good advice):

 

Don't worry about this right now. Just set up the room and don't obsess about making it sonically dead.

 

From an acoustic point of view, the industry is less "dead-oriented" than it used to be, and for lots of good reasons. The profileration of good quality active near field monitors, and the benefits of mixing in a "real space" are two of many reasons why dead is no longer the goal. You can find reams of information about this if you look -- this sort of info can be particularly helpful if you are looking for a non-drug alternative for insomnia (e.g. much of it will put you to sleep).

 

From a practical point of view, you don't know what the room's issues are, and you may put a lot of effort and expense into something that's not a (or not the) problem.

 

If you're setting up a high end mastering room, go ahead and obsess. Or if you've set up a room and need to cure an acoustic problem, go ahead and obsess (and get the very thing you need). But if you're just setting up a nice little recording space, just get a rug, a comfy chair or sofa, and you'll most likely be fine. Plus, you wont have ugly-ass egg cartons all over the wall that don't do a damn thing, or some otherwise unneccessary and costly solution that you didn't really need.

Dooby Dooby Doo
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Originally posted by where02190:

Particularly for drums and percussion, a dead room is not necessarily a good sounding recording room.

And then some. Too dead = muted, harsh, lifeless drums.
No matter how good something is, there will always be someone blasting away on a forum somewhere about how much they hate it.
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Originally posted by fantasticsound:

Definitely check out Ethan's forum. But Where, mic placement alone won't help a 15 x 15 x 8 room's sound for drum recording. :D

It'll help but some treatment will help more, and you will need all the help you can get.

 

FWIW, Ethan is no acoustics expert, despite his claims to that point, but he has an effective and practical knowledge of band-aid type solutions to rooms with limited acoustic potential. That's what we're looking at here, so go ask Ethan!

A WOP BOP A LU BOP, A LOP BAM BOOM!

 

"There is nothing I regret so much as my good behavior. What demon possessed me that I behaved so well?" -Henry David Thoreau

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Originally posted by where02190:

Originally posted by fantasticsound:

But Where, mic placement alone won't help a 15 x 15 x 8 room's sound for drum recording. .

I never said that mic placement alone would solve their problems. I'm well aware that mic placement alone does not a good drum sound make. a well tuned kit, properly placed in the room (which I also mentioned) good mics, pres and recording medium (IE properly maintained analog tape deck, good A-D converters etc...) and a top notch drummer all play vital and equal roles along with the room to recording good drum tracks.
You missed the :D in my post?? :)

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

Soundclick

fntstcsnd

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