Jump to content
Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Recommended Posts

 

Intro

 

The Yamaha PRS-SX600 is the second arranger keyboard that I've owned.  My first was a 76-key arranger from Yamaha's DGX series which was in production around 2003, but I only used it to practice piano material that I learned from my last piano teacher.  I did not use its arranger features at all, because I didn't understand what an arranger could do for me.   I eventually learned over time about arranger features and started to get more and more interested.  This post is focused on my first impressions of the PSR-SX600, and thus is not intended to be a thorough review of all its capabilities.

 

An arranger keyboard is typically set up so that notes that you play with your left hand will influence the bass line and other harmonies being played by the auto-accompaniment.   The typical way to play an arranger is to manage the auto-accompaniment with your left hand and play the melody with your right hand.  Your virtual backing band will play their harmony parts in a given key until you play a different set of notes with your left hand.

 

Thus, the arranger keyboard will typically be split into 2 zones with the left zone designated for style management - the manuals calls this zone the "chord section" - and the right zone - "voice section" -  for melody.  Some arrangers, such as the PSR-SX600 will let you set this split point between the style side of the keyboard, and the melody side.  The PSR-SX600 gives you two split points - the Style Split Point for splitting the chord and voice sections, and the Left Split Point for splitting between left hand zone and right hand zone.  These two points can be different, although I believe they default to identical positions.

 

Many songs are built out of song sections such as intros, verses, choruses, bridges, outros, etc.  Arranger styles typically include song sections that are intended to match the style - thus a bossa nova intro, R&B intro, and rock intro will sound different from one another.  A lot of songs are also played with variations of how instrumental parts such as the drums and bass line are played.  Arranger keyboard styles typically include at least one variation.  PSR-SX600 styles have 4.

 

Arranger keyboards are designed to allow for easy real-time arrangement of a song, so they typically include buttons that trigger these song sections, so that players can decide on the fly when the auto-accompaniment should, say, switch to another variation, insert a fill, or finish the song with an outro.  Easy real-time arrangement of a song is what distinguishes arranger keyboards from other types of keyboards.

 

Arranger keyboards are well suited for people who want to explore unfamiliar musical styles - and thus, would struggle to create song sections in those unfamiliar styles - people who want to play cover tunes with the greater flexibility that an arranger offers over a backing track player or just pressing play on a sequencer in song mode; and people who want to write an original song in a recognizable musical style.  These users would probably appreciate not having to program all the song sections and variations from scratch.

 

Key features of the Yamaha PSR-SX600 which attracted me:

 

3 Intros, 4 Variations, 4 Fills, Break, 3 Endings

Style Creator

Half-bar Fills

Style Section Reset button

Style Unison (eg. the horn section unison riff in “Sir Duke”), assignable to pedal

Style Accent - velocity values from left-hand input can affect Style performance by adding/removing notes

Multi Pads - can trigger audio files as well as MIDI clips

73 Super Articulation Voices (vs. 14 Super Articulation Lite voices)

 

There are more expensive arranger keyboards which have specs and features that can justify the additional cost.  There are less expensive arrangers which do not support as many song sections/variations and do not provide any onboard editing of styles.   I chose the PSR-SX600 because it had the specs and features that looked like the best match for my interests, and appeared to have a good price-performance ratio.  The Style Unison and Style Accent features are not found in the more expensive PSR-SX models, or even the top-of-the-line Genos.

 

Chord Tutor

 

The PSR-SX600 is not designed to recognize every piano chord voicing of G13Alt known to humankind, or any other chord.  It is only designed to recognize certain voicings, and this is where Chord Tutor can be a handy tool to look up what those voicings are.  Pick the key and chord type, and Chord Tutor will show you the chord in standard notation, as well as what it looks like as a shape on the keyboard.  It should be noted that the chord shapes shown are for rootless voicings, which may be confusing to beginners.  For example, the Fmin9 shape does not include F (the root).  I think I get why Yamaha implemented Chord Tutor this way - if you aspire to play keyboard with a human bass player, you'll have to learn rootless voicings sooner or later, because bassists will be playing the root and might get annoyed with you competing with them for the root.

 

In any case, beginners will appreciate using Chord Tutor to learn more chord shapes.  Experienced musicians without experience in arranger keyboards could use Chord Tutor to help figure out which chord voicings they can and cannot use effectively with this arranger.

 

Chord Fingering Types

 

For the auto-accompaniment to play in the desired harmony, you play certain notes in the chord/auto-accompaniment zone of the keyboard.  When you want the harmony to change to a different chord, you play another set of notes in that zone.  The Yamaha PSR-SX600 manuals refer to this as “specifying the chord”.

 

The notes that you have to play so specify a chord depends on which Chord Fingering Type (CFT) you select. .  Some CFTs are meant for people who want the auto-accompaniment to play more notes in a chord than they are comfortable playing with the left hand.  Some allow more direct control over the harmony but require a greater vocabulary of chord shapes.  Below is a listing of CFTs that I tried, and corresponding comments:

 

Single Finger

Fingered

AI Fingered

Multi Finger 

Full Keyboard

AI Full Keyboard

Smart Chord  

 

Single Finger lets you play major triads with just 1 finger,  minor triads and unaltered dominant 7th chords with just 2 fingers;  and minor 7th chords with just 3 fingers.  It’s a good CFT for users who want to play 4-note chords but aren’t comfortable playing all 4 notes at once.  It’s really good for users who want to hear major and minor  triads but are not comfortable with those yet.  Yamaha seems to assume whoever uses this CFT doesn’t know what diminished or augmented triads are.

 

Fingered is for specifying the chord by playing 3 or more notes, which you will have to do anyway if you want chords that are more sophisticated than the ones available in the Single Finger CFT..  A selection of chord shapes that the arranger understands is shown in the reference manual.  These shapes are root voicings in the key of C, such as C6, CMaj7, Cm7b5, C7sus, and so on.  A table of chord spellings is provided, for those who want to extrapolate what the shapes should look like in other keys.   The manual also suggests using the onboard Chord Tutor for looking up chords, although beginners may be confused by the Chord Tutor shapes in the key of C being different because, again, they're rootless.  So, in exchange for having to learn more chord shapes,  this CFT gives you a lot more control over the harmony compared to Single Finger.  Note that you may have to move the Style split point, because the default auto-accompaniment zone may not have enough room for chord shapes in certain keys, such as A.

 

Fingered On Bass works a lot like Fingered, except the lowest note of the chord played is always the bass note.  The name of this CFT might make you think it will let you play a bass line with your left hand without triggering a change in key for the auto-accompaniment.  If this is indeed the case, you might prefer to just flip the chord and voice sections, so that you can specify chords with your right hand, and play the bass line with your left hand.

 

AI Fingered is basically the same as Fingered, according to the Reference Manual, except you may be able to just use 2 fingers to specify a chord, based on the previously played chord.  Yes, I find this description vague.  You're giving up some control over the harmony because, as implied by the AI, some artificial intelligence is trying to guess a good harmony to play.  This CFT might be worth exploring for happy accidents, as it may be annoying if you have a clear idea of how you want the chord progression to go, and it doesn't make the right guesses.

 

Multi Finger is the default CFT.  The arranger is generally smart enough to  detect whether you are specifying a chord in Single or Fingered CFT as you play.

 

Full Keyboard works like the Fingered CFT, except chords are detected in the entire key range.  It seems to detect most of the two-handed chord voicings that I learned from the Jazz Chords for Beginners course on the Open Studio Jazz website, except the dominant 13th, which has left hand playing  root and 7th, and right hand playing the 3rd, 13th, and 9th.  It also does not detect the altered dominant shape that I know, in which the right hand plays a flatted 9th and 13th.

 

AI Full Keyboard works like Full Keyboard, but like AI Fingered requires less than 3 notes to be played.  9th, 11th and 13th chords cannot be played - according to the manual.  This might also have happy accident potential.

 

Smart Chord CFT  lets you play a chord with your left hand, by only using one finger of your left hand.  You set the key signature and the Smart Chord Type.  For example, if the key signature is C Major, and you want to hear a C Major triad, you just play the C note - you don’t have to play the other 2 notes.  Similarly if you want to play a B diminished triad, you only play the B note.  If you have some music theory knowledge, you might recognize Smart Chord as an implementation of scale harmonization.  This feature would appeal to players who want to play a chord progression in a given key signature, using only one finger at a time, as it is much easier than having to memorize the keyboard patterns for various chords in different keys.  Smart Chord Type settings include Standard, Pop, Jazz,  Dance and Simple.  The Jazz Type setting generates the most sophisticated chords, as expected.   A disadvantage of the Smart Chord feature is that it is not suited to blues, as dominant chords are frequently substituted for major chords in blues styles.  The I chord in a C Major blues, for example, could be a C Major triad, or it could be a C7, which includes a Bb.   Bb is not part of the C Major scale, so if you use only chords from harmonizing C Major, you won’t have C7 available.  For similar reasons, this CFT is ill-suited for chord substitutions and reharmonizations in general.

 

Voices

 

PSR-SX600 sound presets (“Voices”) are built on instrument multi-samples, which is standard for arranger keyboards.  While the sound design capabilities hardly rival those of, say, a Yamaha Montage or Waldorf Quantum, there is some flexibility for tweaking the Voices.  You can edit settings for envelopes, filters, and even LFOs.  

 

Super Articulation (marked as S.Art) Voices produce sonic effects like trumpet fall-off, guitar hammer-ons, etc. depending on how you play.  These effects can also be triggered by a button or a pedal.   Each comes with an Info screen that you can look at for hints on how to play them expressively. For example, most of  the guitar S.Art Voices have Info screens that advise trying piano legato.  I am more used to the so-called “legato” on guitar, not piano legato playing.  I think I’m starting to get the hang of it though, as I can occasionally get that “guitar legato” sound.  Thankfully the PSR-SX600 has 2 pedal inputs, so one could be used for S.Art playing and the other used as a more typical piano damper.

 

The non-S.Art Voices generally sound like I would expect out of a $1000 keyboard rompler in this price range.  This is neither criticism nor praise - just setting expectations for whoever might be reading this.  The specs say that these include 27 MegaVoice, 27 Sweet!, 64 Cool!, and 71 Live! Voices but I don't really know at this time what makes a Voice Sweet!, Cool!, Live!, or MegaVoice.

 

UI/UX

 

I did not have to read the manual to select Styles and Voices or to activate song sections such as Intros and Outros.

 

I did have to dig into the manuals to learn how to change the CFT, Split Points, and other settings that require menu-diving.  I also needed the manual to get some idea of the intended usage of each CFT, although the manuals fell short in their attempts to explain the AI CFTs.  

 

The Info screens for the S.Art Voices are a very nice touch.

 

Next Steps

 

Explore Style Unison and Style Accent

 

Continue exploring unfamiliar styles, like 90% of the ones in the World category, and all the Entertainment ones.  There are also Voice and Style Expansion Packs like  Indonesia 3 that I want to check out as it appears to have gamelan stuff.

 

Sketch out a composition and save it as MIDI (SMF file).  I will probably use the multi-track recording feature.  Real-time recording is also possible, for those who can manage the auto-accompaniment with one hand, play something with the other hand, and also press the auto-accompaniment buttons to change song variations, insert breaks, etc. without missing a beat.

 

Load the SMF file into Ableton Live or hardware groovebox for further development of the piece.

 

Import an SMF file created on other gear (software or hardware) and see what can do with it on the PSR-SX600

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...
On 4/15/2022 at 6:07 AM, GovernorSilver said:

 

 

Voices

 

PSR-SX600 sound presets (“Voices”) are built on instrument multi-samples, which is standard for arranger keyboards.  While the sound design capabilities hardly rival those of, say, a Yamaha Montage or Waldorf Quantum, there is some flexibility for tweaking the Voices.  You can edit settings for envelopes, filters, and even LFOs.  basket random

 

Super Articulation (marked as S.Art) Voices produce sonic effects like trumpet fall-off, guitar hammer-ons, etc. depending on how you play.  These effects can also be triggered by a button or a pedal.   Each comes with an Info screen that you can look at for hints on how to play them expressively. For example, most of  the guitar S.Art Voices have Info screens that advise trying piano legato.  I am more used to the so-called “legato” on guitar, not piano legato playing.  I think I’m starting to get the hang of it though, as I can occasionally get that “guitar legato” sound.  Thankfully the PSR-SX600 has 2 pedal inputs, so one could be used for S.Art playing and the other used as a more typical piano damper.

 

The non-S.Art Voices generally sound like I would expect out of a $1000 keyboard rompler in this price range.  This is neither criticism nor praise - just setting expectations for whoever might be reading this.  The specs say that these include 27 MegaVoice, 27 Sweet!, 64 Cool!, and 71 Live! Voices but I don't really know at this time what makes a Voice Sweet!, Cool!, Live!, or MegaVoice.

 

I'm very agree. I have used PSR-SX600 and the voice is a point I like the most.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Sweet voices have built-in vibrato, Live voices are sampled with some inherent ambience/far-miking. Cool voices are programmed to have some gestures or characteristics of their imitated source instrument (I know, harder to define). MegaVoices use velocity switching to not only reproduce the different dynamics of tone changing, but also other articulations etc. So a guitar switching from the pitched notes to harmonics, or deadened notes etc.

 

On 4/14/2022 at 7:07 PM, GovernorSilver said:

The specs say that these include 27 MegaVoice, 27 Sweet!, 64 Cool!, and 71 Live! Voices but I don't really know at this time what makes a Voice Sweet!, Cool!, Live!, or MegaVoice.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 9/6/2022 at 11:06 AM, jerrythek said:

Sweet voices have built-in vibrato, Live voices are sampled with some inherent ambience/far-miking. Cool voices are programmed to have some gestures or characteristics of their imitated source instrument (I know, harder to define). MegaVoices use velocity switching to not only reproduce the different dynamics of tone changing, but also other articulations etc. So a guitar switching from the pitched notes to harmonics, or deadened notes etc.

Based on what I've seen in Yamaha manuals, Live voices are the ones sampled in stereo, Cool voices are for electric source instruments, and yes it's vague, but the impression I get is that, for example, rather than sampling a "clean" rhodes, les paul, whatever and then using EQ and effects to simulate many of their typical sounds, they are sampled with their native "non-claen" variations (sampling their tone as played through a typical tube amp of the era, with their "real" overdrive, that kind of thing)

 

 

Maybe this is the best place for a shameless plug! Our now not-so-new new video at https://youtu.be/3ZRC3b4p4EI is a 40 minute adaptation of T. S. Eliot's "Prufrock" - check it out! And hopefully I'll have something new here this year. ;-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi AS:

 

Yes, the manual lists stereo first, but it's the 2nd sentence that gives the clue to what I wrote, which came from my research and earlier reviews of both the Tyros and Genos back when there was this cool magazine... you know. :fume:

 

From the Genos manual: "These acoustic instrument sounds were sampled in stereo, to produce a truly authentic, rich
sound—full of atmosphere and ambience."

 

Their descriptions are vague to the point of obtuse. Pianos and strings etc. which are clearly sampled in stereo are never listed as Live. All the FM Eps are called Cool, but why? And so on...

 

16 hours ago, AnotherScott said:

Based on what I've seen in Yamaha manuals, Live voices are the ones sampled in stereo, Cool voices are for electric source instruments, and yes it's vague, but the impression I get is that, for example, rather than sampling a "clean" rhodes, les paul, whatever and then using EQ and effects to simulate many of their typical sounds, they are sampled with their native "non-claen" variations (sampling their tone as played through a typical tube amp of the era, with their "real" overdrive, that kind of thing)

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, jerrythek said:

Hi AS:

 

Yes, the manual lists stereo first, but it's the 2nd sentence that gives the clue to what I wrote, which came from my research and earlier reviews of both the Tyros and Genos back when there was this cool magazine... you know. :fume:

 

From the Genos manual: "These acoustic instrument sounds were sampled in stereo, to produce a truly authentic, rich
sound—full of atmosphere and ambience."

I see where you're going, though my interpretation would have been that it is merely the fact that they are sampled in stereo that they're using to justify the rest of that puffery verbiage.

 

3 hours ago, jerrythek said:

Their descriptions are vague to the point of obtuse. Pianos and strings etc. which are clearly sampled in stereo are never listed as Live.

Yes. I'm making this up, but my theory is that calling stereo sounds "Live!" came from their arranger division, whereas the synth division also used stereo samples for some sounds, but did not use that terminology. The closest hybridization of the lines' terminology might have been, for example, the arrangers' "Sweet!" flute which, in a Motif-Montage series board has simply been named Sweet Flute... my guess is that the one product design division borrowed that sound from the other, but is still not fully embracing that line's nomenclature for Sweet! Live! Cool! etc. My guess is that every stereo sound in a PSR arranger is called Live!, while the Motif/Montage also have plenty of stereo sounds but with no special marketing word for them. Or did you find stereo piano and string sounds in the PSR/arranger line that were not listed as "Live!"?

 

3 hours ago, jerrythek said:

All the FM Eps are called Cool, but why?

Okay, you've totally got me on that one!

Maybe this is the best place for a shameless plug! Our now not-so-new new video at https://youtu.be/3ZRC3b4p4EI is a 40 minute adaptation of T. S. Eliot's "Prufrock" - check it out! And hopefully I'll have something new here this year. ;-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

First Impressions of the Style Creator and Song Recording

 

I've been working with the Jazz Scales for Beginners course on Open Studio and got tired of hunting for a specific section of a lesson video to practice the scale running approach taught in the course, particularly the "marking the dominant" stuff.  This is a section of the video where Adam Maness plays a chord progression repeatedly, to give the student a chance to practice the lesson material.

 

The PSR-SX600 does not have the chord looping functionality of its more expensive brethren.  Google search suggested that the Style Creator could be used for chord looping.  So I gave that a go.  Unfortunately, the learning curve is steep for me.  This is where Yamaha's decision to release separate Owner's Manual, Reference Manual, etc. documents makes the curve a little steeper - one has to go back and forth between multiple PDFs to piece together the info that is needed. 

 

Between multiple readings of the PDFs and trial and error, I got the looping chord progression that I wanted.  The instrumental parts for a Style are called Channels.  I picked one of the Chord channels for my chord progression, and recorded to that Channel.  I didn't save the style though because I got a warning message "The data of the original style must be deleted before recording. Delete?" and didn't want to risk overwriting the big band jazz style that I was using as a template.

 

Jeremy See has a nice intro to Yamaha PSR-SX family Style Creator here:

 

 

So next, I tried Song Recording.  Again, I put up with the same back and forth between manual PDFs, then eventually got around to recording the desired chord progression.  All I did was trigger one of the factory styles with chord shapes.   I recorded 8 iterations of the chord progression to make up for not having a looper.  To record a Song, you have to hit REC and Stop at the same time, THEN hit Play to begin recording.  For some reason, my brain was so addled from fooling around with Style Creator that it took a while to register this.  

 

So Song Recording was the faster way to record a pseudo-looping chord progression for study and practice, compared to messing with Style Creator.  For practice with my violin, I should have hit one of the Intro buttons and recorded an intro, to give myself some time to lift up the violin and bow and get ready to play.  

 

The PSR-SX600 supports playing a Song repeatedly (which to me sounds like looping), repeatedly playing all the Songs in the current folder (random selection or "All" - not sure if that means alpha order), or looping a range of measure within the Song.  I'll get into learning those features at a later date.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cool, Live, Sweet, etc.

 

Looking for precision in marketing-speak is like looking for love in all the wrong places. 😉 More than a little puffery, here.

 

Always thought "Cool" meant "velocity switched." Certainly true of PSR Cool! electric pianos. Another term that got abused in voice names: "Dynamic." A few "dynamic" voices appeared in entry-level arranger keyboards. The "dynamic" voices were also velocity switched. So-called "regular" voices did not employ velocity switching.

 

With evolution, a lot of these distinctions got fuzzy.

 

Hope this helps -- pj

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/12/2023 at 3:32 PM, GovernorSilver said:

So next, I tried Song Recording.  Again, I put up with the same back and forth between manual PDFs, then eventually got around to recording the desired chord progression.  All I did was trigger one of the factory styles with chord shapes.   I recorded 8 iterations of the chord progression to make up for not having a looper.  To record a Song, you have to hit REC and Stop at the same time, THEN hit Play to begin recording.  For some reason, my brain was so addled from fooling around with Style Creator that it took a while to register this.  

 

I am unable to edit my earlier post so I have to post this correction to the above, as what I typed was incorrect.  I tried to follow my own steps and failed to get a song recorded.  I eventually recorded something by rereading the manual and realizing I confused two buttons with each other.

 

I repeated the steps below a couple of times to make sure they reproduce the desired results.

 

To record your performance as a Song, to the following:

 

1. Make sure all the settings are already in place, just like you would before performing your song live in front of an audience.  These settings would include Voice and Style settings.

2. In the Song Control section, press REC and Stop.

2. In the Song Control section, press REC again.  This puts the PRS-SX600 in standby, so it will start recording as soon as you start doing something, whether it's triggering the Style with a left-hand chord shape, or playing something in the main keyboard zone with your right hand.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’ve been thinking about one of these to take over to a friend’s for the occasional jam. We’re both advanced players, so I’m not that interested in a lot of the arranger functions, but I do see it has all the features I’m looking for in the way of decently powered and tuned internal speakers, ‘that Yamaha’ sound set of predictably good pianos, half decent EPs, basses, lots of rhythm opportunities and the like. It’s lightweight and has two pedal inputs, USB audio for running my iPad back for better iOS sounds than onboard. The price point is just at the margin of being not too cheap and not too expensive for what I intend to use it for, and the portability is on the large side, but doable considering what I need from the speakers. 

 

The only info I haven’t found anywhere is the quality of the action. Can anyone give me an impression or comparable? Is it at least somewhere near the better end of Yamaha’s synth-style? Or down in the ‘toy’ spectrum? 

____________________________________
Rod

Here for the gear.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

52 minutes ago, drawback said:

The only info I haven’t found anywhere is the quality of the action. Can anyone give me an impression or comparable? Is it at least somewhere near the better end of Yamaha’s synth-style? Or down in the ‘toy’ spectrum? 

 

The quality of action is a step up from the Casio CT-S1 that was formerly my main practice keyboard.  

 

I have not tried any other Yamaha keyboard in the $1000-$1500 price range, so I can't compare this to a MODX or something like that.

 

Just my opinion as a non-advanced player.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, drawback said:

The only info I haven’t found anywhere is the quality of the action. Can anyone give me an impression or comparable? Is it at least somewhere near the better end of Yamaha’s synth-style? Or down in the ‘toy’ spectrum? 

Based on the spec sheet, It has a lesser action than the "FSB" action in the PSR-SX700/900 above it. About the FSB, Yamaha says:

 

The new FSB Keyboard offers remarkable playability thanks to its heavier initial key resistance and greater key travel. The refined keyboard structure, with an adjusted fulcrum, allows you to play comfortably even on the backs of the keys whilst upgraded components suppress horizontal key movement.

 

The 600 has what they simply call organ action, which is also how they spec the PSR-EW425/473/373/310. I have no personal experience with any of them, though.

 

One thing that appeals to me about the 600 over the more expensive 700/900, though, is that the buttons are easier to see compared to the black-on-black of the others. The sizing/spacing/legends seem better, too. I also happen to prefer the pitch/mod wheels. (Of course, you lose a bunch too.)

 

2101996287_ScreenShot2023-01-20at2_47_28PM.thumb.jpg.a8699499593f04ca841be2bc97c71ab5.jpg

 

I

39 minutes ago, GovernorSilver said:

The quality of action is a step up from the Casio CT-S1 that was formerly my main practice keyboard.  

 

Just my opinion as a non-advanced player.

 

That's pretty encouraging, since the CT-S1 (same action as my recently acquired CT-S500) is surprisingly good (and better than the lower end Korgs and Rolands).

  • Thanks 1

Maybe this is the best place for a shameless plug! Our now not-so-new new video at https://youtu.be/3ZRC3b4p4EI is a 40 minute adaptation of T. S. Eliot's "Prufrock" - check it out! And hopefully I'll have something new here this year. ;-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@AnotherScott  Jeremy See's video below  also mentions the keybed differences, compared to the more expensive PSR-SX models that you mention.   

The SX-700 is about $1600 and the SX-900 is about $2300.  If keybed alone is the highest priority and money is no object, then I suppose one of these or even the Genos would be a better choice than the SX-600.

 

I paid just over $800 for my SX-600, thanks to a deal I found.   I was leaning towards buying an even cheaper arranger keyboard to satisfy my curiosity about that way music-making.   Then I watched the video below.  Then I contemplated the relative merits of onboard style editor, Unison, Accent, etc. features of the SX-600 vs. the even cheaper Yamaha arrangers which don't have these features vs. the SX-700 and SX-900 which have the nicer keybed, as well as several specs and features that I didn't really care about.   

 

It took me under 60 seconds to decide which model I wanted.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...