Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Live Hearing Protection w/headphones - comp/limiter, what?


Recommended Posts

Hello all,

 

A number of years ago I started a thread asking about a way to monitor the actual dB SPL output of monitoring headphones in a live situation. At the time that thread didn't really go anywhere partly because I was way too vague. Anyways, here I am a few years later, and I'm looking into ways to maximize hearing protection during certain performance situations. For a lot of performances with bands, I've switched over to using headphones to help cut down on stage noise and to try to shield myself from cymbals (lol); granted it's partly due to a sound engineer who has been trying to move my church over to that for a while(all this prior to last March obviously). Anyways, while I haven't had anything for the last year, it looks like I'm going to have a weeklong gig this summer where I know I will be in close proximity on stage to an acoustic drumset in a building that, to put it nicely, is the exact opposite of what you would want to prevent buildup of sound pressure. So I'm planning on going the headphone route for monitoring again; I have some closed-back AKG's that should do the trick. I also have one of those Behringer PM1 beltpack things just to give myself a volume control of some kind. Since I'll be using a rack for some things anyways, and I have some space left, I'm wondering if anyone has any suggestions for something to cap off the monitoring volume at a certain level because it's too easy to turn things up too loud, and to prevent spikes in volume.

 

I've seen a good number of folks using compressors or limiters (or comp/limiters) set to what's effectively brickwall limiting to prevent spikes in volume. My understanding is that something like a Presonus Bluesmax or dbx266XS would work for that side of things. Is that right?

 

Should that prevent spikes in volume, that still doesn't do much for actually giving me a sense of how many decibels I'm actually putting into my ears. I haven't gotten the impression that a VU-meter would do the trick either. I'm not sure if there's something that would actually work for this. Anyone who's done this type of thing before, what are you using to protect your ears? Keep in mind I'm not using IEMs but rather headphones.

 

 

Thanks,

 

Max

Yamaha: Motif XF8, MODX7, YS200, MX61, CVP-305, CLP-130, YPG-235, PSR-295, PSS-470 | Roland: Fantom 7, JV-1000

Kurzweil: PC3-76, PC4 (88) | Korg: N1R, X5DR | Emu: Proteus/1 | Casio: CT-370 | Novation: Launchkey 37 MK3

Former: Emu Proformance Plus & Mo'Phatt, Korg Krome 61, Roland Fantom XR & JV-1010, Behringer CAT

Yamaha Pacifica 112V & APX600 | Washburn WI64 | Ibanez BTB-675 | Alesis SamplePad Pro | Assorted organs, accordions, other instruments

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 34
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Not to be all devil's advocate since I know this isn't the question you asked, but is there a reason why you are sticking to overears and not going the IEM route? They're meant for exactly this purpose, and a basic pair of Shures or comparable model shouldn't break the bank, especially if you're considering picking up an extra piece anyway.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wouldn"t the sensitivity of the headphones/IEMs factor into the dB level reaching your ears? If so, then whatever you would use to monitor levels earlier in the chain would be relative rather than absolute.

 

I use the Rolls PM55P as a headphone mixer and it has a limiter built in, although I couldn"t tell you how it works or at what level the limiter is set. The only settings are off/on. I just set the levels at a comfortable volume and I"m good to go. No issues in 3 years.

 

As for IEMs vs headphones, I use the Westone ambients like @nursers does, but a couple of band mates use the KZ ZS10 Pro IEMs, which I believe are triple driver and only $50. Even if you don"t like them enough to be your main pair, they are inexpensive to try and can be used as a backup.

Nord Stage 3 HA88, Nord Stage 3 Compact, Casio CT-S1, Radial Key Largo, Westone AM Pro 30, Rolls PM55P, K&M 18880 + 18881, Bose S1 Pro, JBL 305p MKII, Zoom Q2n-4K

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IME, if the cans have a good noise rejection rating, they can be run at a low non-fatiguing volume. When I use them I do not use a limiter.

 

This is going to sound like an IEM vs cans thing, but it is just my experience. I've have both IEMs (1964 Ears quads) and cans (David Clark 10S/DC ). For my use, the cans are superior.

 

  • With IEMs, a limiter should be used. Due the small volume of the air column between the transducers and the eardrum, they deliver a much more impactful (scary) impulse due to a transient from a dropped mic' or power glitch somewhere in the chain. Though they were custom molds, they would sometimes leak ambient sound. This can be annoying on stage because you have to stop and fiddle with it. Comply Soft Wraps helped with this.
  • Because of their superior sound rejection capability (DCs have a certified noise reduction rating), over-ears can be run at a very low, non-fatiguing volume. They have a much larger volume between tranducer and ear drum than IEMs and create less impact to the ear due to transients.

 

Regarding appearance, when wearing cans on stage, I've never had one comment about it. (There could be other reasons for that too ;) ).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Measuring SPL of a headphone would be a complex endeavor.

I've never done it and don't know how to do it.

 

Since IEMs are made to allow some ambient sound and some closed ear headphones are designed to block sound intrusion or escape, headphones will provide better protection against loud drums.

 

I've got a pair of the Extreme Isolation headphones, which are intended to prevent your playback from leaking into a recording mic but block sound effectively in both directions. Those are nice.

 

Some AKG headphones allow leakage even though they are designed to fully cover the ears, the K240 is one example. Those are definitely not "sealed",

It took a chunk of my life to get here and I am still not sure where "here" is.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not to be all devil's advocate since I know this isn't the question you asked, but is there a reason why you are sticking to overears and not going the IEM route? They're meant for exactly this purpose, and a basic pair of Shures or comparable model shouldn't break the bank, especially if you're considering picking up an extra piece anyway.

 

1. Direct risk of hearing damage - not comfortable with doing that. Not to mention that every musician I know who's used IEMs primarily has hearing damage, actually worse than the guys who blasted their stage monitors. There's a family history of hearing loss on my father's side so that isn't working in my favor either, and it creates so many problems later in life that one wouldn't think of (can't hear your wife correctly or your boss on the phone or interview questions?). I stay away from earbuds for that reason as well.

 

Less important factors:

2. Would require an ambience mic to be able to have conversations unless multiple mics were set on sends only to the band, etc. We wouldn't have a tech setuip to do this.

3. Ear irritation, and of course you can just take headphones off quickly if need be.

4. Headphones seem to have better isolation in a good way, and the seal issue isn't so present.

Yamaha: Motif XF8, MODX7, YS200, MX61, CVP-305, CLP-130, YPG-235, PSR-295, PSS-470 | Roland: Fantom 7, JV-1000

Kurzweil: PC3-76, PC4 (88) | Korg: N1R, X5DR | Emu: Proteus/1 | Casio: CT-370 | Novation: Launchkey 37 MK3

Former: Emu Proformance Plus & Mo'Phatt, Korg Krome 61, Roland Fantom XR & JV-1010, Behringer CAT

Yamaha Pacifica 112V & APX600 | Washburn WI64 | Ibanez BTB-675 | Alesis SamplePad Pro | Assorted organs, accordions, other instruments

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Measuring SPL of a headphone would be a complex endeavor.

I've never done it and don't know how to do it.

 

Since IEMs are made to allow some ambient sound and some closed ear headphones are designed to block sound intrusion or escape, headphones will provide better protection against loud drums.

 

I've got a pair of the Extreme Isolation headphones, which are intended to prevent your playback from leaking into a recording mic but block sound effectively in both directions. Those are nice.

 

Some AKG headphones allow leakage even though they are designed to fully cover the ears, the K240 is one example. Those are definitely not "sealed",

 

I have K240 Studios, and yeah, those are not sealed. I did use them a few times but obviously it kind of defeated the purpose (though one could always put earplugs underneath them). But I'm going to be using a pair of K275 closed-back headphones that I got last fall. Those have a pretty decent seal.

Yamaha: Motif XF8, MODX7, YS200, MX61, CVP-305, CLP-130, YPG-235, PSR-295, PSS-470 | Roland: Fantom 7, JV-1000

Kurzweil: PC3-76, PC4 (88) | Korg: N1R, X5DR | Emu: Proteus/1 | Casio: CT-370 | Novation: Launchkey 37 MK3

Former: Emu Proformance Plus & Mo'Phatt, Korg Krome 61, Roland Fantom XR & JV-1010, Behringer CAT

Yamaha Pacifica 112V & APX600 | Washburn WI64 | Ibanez BTB-675 | Alesis SamplePad Pro | Assorted organs, accordions, other instruments

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No scientific data, but I know when taking my in-ears out--for instance, doing an "encore" after I've packed them away--it's easily twice as loud if not more without them in. Way more high end from the drums which are typically 5-10 feet from me.

 

Also the in-ears pass the "ears ringing after shows" test, as in I don't have it anymore.

 

Just a note, I got custom non-ported in-ears and don't really like them. Lots of isolation but when I sing it blocks out the rest of the signal due to pressure in my head. I wish I had gotten ported, I'm going back to using my trusty Shure 215s even though they are single driver vs my triple driver customs. Honestly I never got that much quality improvement anyway, and the extra bass bleed through the Shures means my monitor mix is simpler. Right now one of the 215s is around 80 bucks on Amazon, and there is a new company whose name escapes me that has great reviews and is even cheaper.

 

I've always had a limiter in the chain right before my ears--a shure bodyback, then two different Behringers (P1 and now the P2). I'm not sure how good the limiters are in these cheap devices but I'd want one there for sure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... Just a note, I got custom non-ported in-ears and don't really like them. Lots of isolation but when I sing it blocks out the rest of the signal due to pressure in my head....
This is a good point. When playing saxophone, earplugs (or IEMs) did not work. The bone conduction sound of the buzzing mouthpiece altered the tone-in-my-head too much. Very kazoo like.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not to mention that every musician I know who's used IEMs primarily has hearing damage, actually worse than the guys who blasted their stage monitors.

Are you sure that "every musician you know" didn't start using IEMs because of hearing damage caused by monitors on a loud stage? That's exactly my situation. The damage was already done, that's why I switched to IEMs! If your hearing is damaged by using IEMs, you're using them wrong, imo. My IEM's primary purpose is to act as earplugs! They absolutely cut the db levels my ears get from the stage by a huge amount. I then turn their level up to the minimum setting that lets me hear everything in balance and play comfortably. It took some getting used to, since the energy & excitement of a live music performance is oftentimes associated with loudness - but I persevered and now it's good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you sure that "every musician you know" didn't start using IEMs because of hearing damage caused by monitors on a loud stage?
This was my situation. Ringing in ears after the gig? I thought that was normal. The ringing in my ears the following morning was quite literally a wake-up call, and I went to in-ears from then on.

 

Cheers, Mike.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are shooting ear muffs that lower the sound pressure levels by 28 db and have an input for right and left stereo monitors. I have used them for practice. Here"s an example:

 

https://www.brownells.com/shooting-accessories/ear-eye-protection/ear-muffs/pro-slim-gold-headsets-prod27554.aspx

 

Much more effective than over-the-ear headphones.

Kawai KG-2C, Nord Stage 3 73, Electro 4D, 5D and Lead 2x, Moog Voyager and Little Phatty Stage II, Slim Phatty, Roland Lucina AX-09, Hohner Piano Melodica, Spacestation V3, pair of QSC 8.2s.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah I guess if you blast your IEMs at high volume it could cause problems. I start at 0 and only turn up as loud as I need to go. It's probably the same volume I listen to podcasts at, mainly because our stage volume is very low--our current drummer isn't that loud, and there are no amps on stage.

 

Even so, it's much louder than my IEMs are.

 

A few years ago, in the same band but with a different drummer, I was struggling with wedges. We were a 6 piece and we'd barely fit on stages, everyone had amps, and where the @#$# am I going to put my wedge where my keyboards wouldn't block it. MAN it was loud, especially in certain clubs with the sound bouncing around. I never could sleep after gigs due to my ears ringing. My final wake up call was the end of "Rockin' in the Free World" of all things (it was a request I think)...the drummer hit four crashes in a row as hard as he could, six feet from me, and I felt my eardrums distort. I immediately started looking into IEMs and if I couldn't have made them work I would have quit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agree with others on the hearing damage stuff: there is no way across the broader population of musicians that IEMS do more damage than those using stage monitors. As mentioned a lot of those with eharing damage have swapped to IEMS plus IEMS have not been that financially available to weekend warriors like me for more than 10-15 years or so, so there's no longitudinal data to support a claim they are worse. Also like others have said, my ear ringing post-gig has reduced substantially since moving to IEMs.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

TL;DR use common sense, a comfortable listening level, and a limiter.

 

Measuring SPL in the ear canal is highly problematic; I recommend taking the time to really hear out your playing situation and setting your listening volume to a comfortable level that survives ambient stage noise. If your IEMs don't seal enough to let you do that, you need IEMs with a better seal. I have a set of Extreme Isolation EX-29s that I use sometimes, but usually in studio tracking rooms; they're too much of a PITA when I'm on stage.

 

I use custom IEMs and play them at very low levels. They work great for isolation and give me all I need as I play (note that I do not sing or play winds). They're pretty flat to my ears, so I don't overexaggerate or thin out parts of the frequency spectrum in order to feel "right".

 

Limiting is a very good idea; one transient can ruin your day (and every other day after that). You want something that hard-limits with a mercilessly fast attack time, in other words something designed for safety rather than good sound. The original Aphex Dominator was like this.

Dr. Mike Metlay (PhD in nuclear physics, golly gosh) :D

Janitor and Hall Monitor, Dr. Mike's Studio Workshop

 

clicky!: more about me ~ my schwag ~ my radio station (and my fam) ~ my local tribe ~ my day job

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you everyone. While I get the point about whether the musicians I know switched to IEMs *because* of hearing damage, the ones I'm thinking of are younger and have been IEM users as long as I can remember; not that it's impossible they damaged their hearing really early on, of course. I'm just nervous about putting a speaker actually in my ear. Thank you Dr. Metlay for the info on limiting - sounds like I should go out and get a good limiter and call it good.

Yamaha: Motif XF8, MODX7, YS200, MX61, CVP-305, CLP-130, YPG-235, PSR-295, PSS-470 | Roland: Fantom 7, JV-1000

Kurzweil: PC3-76, PC4 (88) | Korg: N1R, X5DR | Emu: Proteus/1 | Casio: CT-370 | Novation: Launchkey 37 MK3

Former: Emu Proformance Plus & Mo'Phatt, Korg Krome 61, Roland Fantom XR & JV-1010, Behringer CAT

Yamaha Pacifica 112V & APX600 | Washburn WI64 | Ibanez BTB-675 | Alesis SamplePad Pro | Assorted organs, accordions, other instruments

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any limiter recommendations in addition to the Aphex Dominator? Kind of wondering if a compressor set to its maximum ratio and its fastest attack would do the trick. Half-rack would be nice.

Yamaha: Motif XF8, MODX7, YS200, MX61, CVP-305, CLP-130, YPG-235, PSR-295, PSS-470 | Roland: Fantom 7, JV-1000

Kurzweil: PC3-76, PC4 (88) | Korg: N1R, X5DR | Emu: Proteus/1 | Casio: CT-370 | Novation: Launchkey 37 MK3

Former: Emu Proformance Plus & Mo'Phatt, Korg Krome 61, Roland Fantom XR & JV-1010, Behringer CAT

Yamaha Pacifica 112V & APX600 | Washburn WI64 | Ibanez BTB-675 | Alesis SamplePad Pro | Assorted organs, accordions, other instruments

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any limiter recommendations in addition to the Aphex Dominator? Kind of wondering if a compressor set to its maximum ratio and its fastest attack would do the trick. Half-rack would be nice.

 

 

Hard to beat an FMR RNC (Really Nice Compressor). Those are 1/3 rack sized, very quiet and often referred to as "the best compressor you can buy for under $1,000" and they are well under $1k.

There is a brand new one on eBay right now with free shipping for $195. Used can be considerably lower.

It took a chunk of my life to get here and I am still not sure where "here" is.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My experience with a compressor on an ear mix wasn't good. Lost the dynamics, ended up playing harder and louder than normal. I had the engineer remove it after one show. My solution won't work for everybody as it requires individual monitor mixes. I ran lines from the keyboard DIs into a small mixer along with a stereo mix from the monitor desk. In that mix was kick, overheads, acoustic and electric guitars and bass. No other drums, no vocals, no ambience mikes. I got plenty of vocals through the overheads from the Artist's loud af wedges. Took some getting used to being that isolated but my ears didn't ring after a show.

9 Moog things, 3 Roland things, 2 Hammond things and a computer with stuff on it

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A limiter is ok to limit the power, but it creates extra harmonics and changes the sonic balance when in operation. A digital signal can be a problem when limiting, because either the limiter is digital too, which can give serious reconstruction spikes, or the limiter is analog, and it will respond too various kinds of digital rubbish being present in almost every signal that comes from a digital source.

 

Usually, under controlled circumstances you want to create a signal you like from your keyboards and the band mix, as analogue as you can, and then use some eq, well adjusted limiting (will probably require getting used to wrt playing style) and add some realistic reverb (!) so the whole isn't a boundless source of tonal attack on the hearing, but something you can relate to loudness-wise and sound placement-wise.

 

It is unlikely any headphones or buds can stop a significant portion of the dBs produced by a too loud drummer or lousy band amplification, and digital harshness doesn't help with that at all.

 

T

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

It is unlikely any headphones or buds can stop a significant portion of the dBs produced by a too loud drummer or lousy band amplification, and digital harshness doesn't help with that at all.

 

T

 

I'd debate that to say the least. Even ambient IEMs have dropped the volume I hear substantially. As an example, I stand right next to the drummer and on one song I use a patch that's a very fat brass sound. Because I don't have drums coming through the FOH feed, when I play this patch I have to WATCH the drummer's high hat for the tempo as I cannot hear him otherwise. And he's one of those guys that likes hitting them hard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, I'm right next to our drummer, and if I wear my custom earbuds I need a bit of drums in my mix. I don't hear any cymbals at all. They are supposed to knock off a fair bit (18 or more db) and I believe it.

 

The point of a limiter is to set it to avoid damage, not subtly compress your mix like you would a master buss while mixing. You want a brick wall saying "YOU SHALL NOT PASS!!!" like Gandalf. It probably should sound like crap, as that tells you something has gone very wrong. I had mine come on once when I accidentally had the volume way up load, I had been troubleshooting why I wasn't getting a signal. I heard a garbled mess and looked down and saw the limiter light. After that I have been very diligent to double-check that the pack is on, and volume down all the way, before putting them on tentatively.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My experience with a compressor on an ear mix wasn't good. Lost the dynamics, ended up playing harder and louder than normal. I had the engineer remove it after one show. My solution won't work for everybody as it requires individual monitor mixes. I ran lines from the keyboard DIs into a small mixer along with a stereo mix from the monitor desk. In that mix was kick, overheads, acoustic and electric guitars and bass. No other drums, no vocals, no ambience mikes. I got plenty of vocals through the overheads from the Artist's loud af wedges. Took some getting used to being that isolated but my ears didn't ring after a show.

IMO it was a mistake to put compression on your ears mix - I can't imagine having to play while hearing squashed dynamics. You play harder and expect to hear the result of that, and when you don't it messes with you. With in-ears, you want to set up a compressor as a limiter, i.e. with the ratio at infinity but the threshold high enough to allow the full dynamic range of the music to pass. You want limiting to happen only as the result of an accident - someone dropping a mic, unplugging a cable and sending a huge spike through the connection, stuff like that (maybe an exceptionally loud cymbal crash too - whatever you judge to be dangerous to your ears!).

 

Your solution is pretty much how I (and I'm guessing, many others) run my ears â my Rolls box gets an XLR from the monitor desk with the mix I want, minus me. My keys go to a DI box for the house, with the pass-thru going to a separate input on the Rolls. I have two level controls on the Rolls - one for the monitor mix and one for my keys, so I balance things there. You're lucky to get a stereo monitor mix from the house - my cheap Rolls won't do that (but I do get to hear my keys in stereo).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your solution is pretty much how I (and I'm guessing, many others) run my ears â my Rolls box gets an XLR from the monitor desk with the mix I want, minus me. My keys go to a DI box for the house, with the pass-thru going to a separate input on the Rolls. I have two level controls on the Rolls - one for the monitor mix and one for my keys, so I balance things there. You're lucky to get a stereo monitor mix from the house - my cheap Rolls won't do that (but I do get to hear my keys in stereo).

 

So you're probably using the https://rolls.com/product/PM55P that ajstan also mentioned.

 

I guess the limiting could also be done at the mixer but then you're potentially depending on someone else each time to get that right.

 

Are there any other small mixers with limiters for the headphone output?

 

Yeah, I'm right next to our drummer, and if I wear my custom earbuds I need a bit of drums in my mix. I don't hear any cymbals at all. They are supposed to knock off a fair bit (18 or more db) and I believe it.

 

Earplugs and IEMs seem much better at attenuating the highs than the lows.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Above may be some examples of how important it is to set your Threshold control on your compressor/limiter (really more or less the same device depending on the ratio adjustment).

 

If you only want to limit the overly loud occasional outbursts, the Threshold can be set to allow uncompressed music that is below the undesirable volume threshold.

 

If something is too loud, the compressor/limiter will squash it if the Attack is fast enough. If it never gets that loud, your limiter won't kick in.

It took a chunk of my life to get here and I am still not sure where "here" is.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So you're probably using the https://rolls.com/product/PM55P that ajstan also mentioned.

Yes, that one.

I guess the limiting could also be done at the mixer but then you're potentially depending on someone else each time to get that right.

The PM55P limiter has only an on/off switch so if you think about it, I'm depending on Rolls to get it right! I've never heard the limiter kick in while I've used it. Then again, as I mentioned I try to keep the levels down as much as possible.

Are there any other small mixers with limiters for the headphone output?

I have no idea, but any mixer with compression as part of their built-in efx could potentially work, if you set the ratio at infinity and have enough control of the threshold to let the normal dynamic range of the music through. You do want a very fast attack time too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd get the Behringer p2 and have the mixer go into that. Works on AAA battery, can take 1/4 or XLR (iirc, I use a TRS cable) and you'll have a handy volume control at your belt. Very cheap too. Can be either stereo or mono, there's a little switch under the outside cover. I've used mine for something like 100 gigs.

 

Caveat, I'm not positive of the limiter quality, I only paid 39 bucks for the thing :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd get the Behringer p2 and have the mixer go into that. Works on AAA battery, can take 1/4 or XLR (iirc, I use a TRS cable) and you'll have a handy volume control at your belt. Very cheap too. Can be either stereo or mono, there's a little switch under the outside cover. I've used mine for something like 100 gigs.

 

Caveat, I'm not positive of the limiter quality, I only paid 39 bucks for the thing :)

 

Interesting. I read quite a few reviews on the SW site, mostly overwhelming positive, and no one mentions that this unit DOES NOT have a limiter.

Kawai ES110 & ES920 /// Casio CT-X5000

Yamaha Melodica and Alto Recorder

QSC K8.2 // JBL Eon One Compact // Klipsch KMC 3 // Win10 laptop i7 8GB // iPad Pro 9.7" 32GB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd get the Behringer p2 and have the mixer go into that. Works on AAA battery, can take 1/4 or XLR (iirc, I use a TRS cable) and you'll have a handy volume control at your belt. Very cheap too. Can be either stereo or mono, there's a little switch under the outside cover. I've used mine for something like 100 gigs.

 

Caveat, I'm not positive of the limiter quality, I only paid 39 bucks for the thing :)

 

Interesting. I read quite a few reviews on the SW site, mostly overwhelming positive, and no one mentions that this unit DOES NOT have a limiter.

 

 

Dammit, you appear to be correct.

 

The earlier, larger model the P1 DOES mention it has one, and perhaps it was my assumption that the P2 also had one.

 

Well, I actually own the P1 and only went to the P2 because it was smaller and more convenient...I might have to start using the P1 again.

 

As an aside, I just found out our band switched from using a QSC touchmix to a Behringer air mixer due to form factor (rack)...which means I will likely lose my stereo monitor feeds. There are six mono sends on the Behringer. If I wanted to invest I could get the Behringer P16m, which would take an ethernet signal from the main mixer and I could completely control and even eq instruments in my mix...and it has a limiter. If I owned the main mixer I might do that, but paying 250 bucks for stereo and owning a piece of gear that only works with another piece of gear I don't own...don't think I will!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...