Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

patches for minimoog


lsj
 Share

Recommended Posts

I know you can get minimoog patches from tom rhea, that came with the original minimoog. I am looking to purchase song charts for the minimoog. I think it would be a good post if we started submissions of sound charts for the minimoog. it can be used for minimoog, Behringer model d and also for Behringer poly d. just a suggestion, there are a ton of these synths out there...â¦â¦â¦..Larry
Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 19
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Or you could just twist a handful of knobs and learn how easy it is to tweak new sounds yourself.

 

Try this: spend 3 minutes per knob one at a time for the following: Osc 2 tune, Osc 3 tune, Filter cutoff, filter resonance, Attack, Release. Invest those 18 minutes and you will have gained a new confidence in making the instrument do what you want.

 

Once you are happy with that, check out LFO modulation, Noise, and Glide. Apply some filter envelope to the filter. Congrats, you are a Mini programming master!

Moe

---

"I keep wanting to like it's sound, but every demo seems to demonstrate that it has the earth-shaking punch and peerless sonics of the Roland Gaia. " - Tusker

http://www.hotrodmotm.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't remember which musician it was, but I heard a sax player once describe how he would pick a particular sax master and spend part of his practice sessions listening to the details in that player's tone. Then he would experiment with tongue placement,embouchure, etc to find ways to replicate those sounds, much the way that an impressionist like Rich Little would have spent time learning how to replicate other people's voices. Through this process, the sax player was trying to learn how to control elements of tone and develop his own beautiful personal sound.

 

The MiniMoog is a pretty good instrument to learn basic synth functions, as there are no hidden menus and esoteric functions. I liked Moe's suggestion of focussing on each individual control to hear how it affects sound. You could worry about explaining what is happening, or not. (Do I really know exactly WHAT the clutch is doing? I don't care.) Then transition to imitating classic patches that you dig. It's not much different than learning a DAW by taking on a project, instead of just reading the manual. Having said all that though, I WOULD recomend starting with the filter knob turned past halfway, the envelope attacks at zero, the sustain knobs on full, decay at zero or near zero, volume turned up (ð), glide at zero, mod wheel at zero, and noise and oscillators two and three turned to zero at the mixer. Then proceed methodically, rather than turn various knobs randomly. (Pardon me if I missed any crucial controls MM owners. Though I wish it was otherwise, I don't own a Mini. I have played and programmed them.)

 

Depending on the context, I think of programming a Minimoog-style synth in much the same way that I think of "programming" a drawbar organ. i.e. I kind of don't. I know a few good starting points and then I'm just doing it on the fly, making changes as dictated by the music.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Reddit sub r/synthesizers is full of requests for settings for a particular song. Invariably the answer is two saws slightly detuned. Every damn time. I get the impression that many noobie synth owners cannot distinguish one waveform from another. Tone deafness that extends beyond pitch. Timbre deafness. I'm not saying this is the case with the OP. Just an observation.

9 Moog things, 3 Roland things, 2 Hammond things and a computer with stuff on it

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why does everyone assume the OP doesn"t know how to use a Mini?

 

I think it would be a good post if we started submissions of sound charts for the minimoog. it can be used for minimoog, Behringer model d and also for Behringer poly d. just a suggestion, there are a ton of these synths out there...â¦â¦â¦..Larry

 

I didn"t think it was such a bad idea. :popcorn:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanx Mark. I just thought that posting sound charts would really interest the many owner's of these instruments. there are so many great programmers out there which I am definitely not one of them. I love going through all the sounds in the too many plug-ins that I have purchased and all the synths that I have. I have purchased sound libraries from programmers like for my Yamaha MODX that are great. I would never be able to program all my synths and plug-ins anywhere near to these guys. what I do is edit these sounds to my liking once I have a starting point. I am familiar with the Minimoog as I have owned an earlier model, and now own Model D, Arturia minimoog plug-in, and a Poly D...â¦..hoping for some great posts...â¦â¦.Larry
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah that's a great point keyman27. I was just going through Moog (and moog-like) presets yesterday for a project that called for one of my patented lame synth solos :D. I have Monark, which is a faithful emulation, but also Diva and I'll even put Repro-1 into the mix. Looking at all those patches is quite helpful. The minimoog is one of the simpler synths out there, I tried to mess with my computer magazine copy of Bazille the other day and quickly found out that modular is quite the different beast!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back when I was the moderator at an audio electronics website, we'd get people asking how to, say, calculate heat dissipation in a resistor. Without fail, there'd be a dozen posts within the first hour lambasting the poor fellow for not knowing how to calculate Pd in a resistor. From peoples' reactions, you'd think that it was costing them money, out of pocket, to answer the question. I confess that I never understood that point of view. If you don't want to chip in, that's okay, just don't answer--leave it to others.

 

There's two kinds of people who use synths: The kind who want to play music on them and the kind who want to design sounds. Yes, that's an oversimplification as there's some overlap, but still...there's more truth to it than some would like to acknowledge.

 

I'm more interested in the music than the sound. Yes, the sound's important, but my focus is on the musical notes themselves. I'm quite content to use presets if I can find one that's anywhere near what I want. At this point, I'm lucky if I can manage an hour a week to play music and it's usually fragmented into five and ten minute segments. Given that I'm trying to write original stuff, it is illogical for me to spend that hour twiddling knobs when I need to be coming up with music. It's the highest, best use of my musical time. (Oh, how I miss the days when I was able to devote as much as six hours a day to music!)

 

Grey

I'm not interested in someone's ability to program. I'm interested in their ability to compose and play.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's two kinds of people who use synths: The kind who want to play music on them and the kind who want to design sounds. Yes, that's an oversimplification as there's some overlap, but still...there's more truth to it than some would like to acknowledge.

 

Grey

There's also the phenomenon where people convince themselves that "tech" is beyond them and are so palsied by this that they are unwilling to try.

Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.

-Mark Twain

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a keys player who loves that P-Funk sound but never touched a synth until I got a great deal on a Behringer Model D from the Garage Sale, I gotta say, with much respect, that it strikes me as odd that newbie synth players would need to pay dues and re-create from scratch those classic Moog sounds in order to learn the instrument. I get that I for sure need to spend the time working the knobs and experimenting, but for me, the priority is learning how to be expressive playing the riffs, using the modulation and pitch bend wheels, getting the musicality that I want out of the keys themselves. Maybe that's the wrong approach, but having a few quick charts to get me the sounds I need to start out would be very helpful in achieving that end! I'm like a guitar player who just wants to plug his Strat into a Fender Twin and match the knobs to his favorite player's tone so he can then go about the business of actually playing the guitar. That said, I completely agree that I've gotta understand and learn the mechanics - definitely going to take that advice to heart and dig in.

Numa X Piano 73 | Yamaha CP4 | Mojo 61 | Motion Sound KP-612s | Hammond M3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Buy the Moog D ios Ipad app. Plenty of sounds come with it, you can hear what each one sounds like before you go to the trouble of setting all the knobs.
Kurzweil Forte, Yamaha Motif ES7, Muse Receptor 2 Pro Max, Neo Ventilator
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Buy the Moog D ios Ipad app. Plenty of sounds come with it, you can hear what each one sounds like before you go to the trouble of setting all the knobs.
Moog might still be offering this app for free like they were at the beginning of quarantine. But if not, it's the best $18 I've ever spent (though I don't have a hardware Moog or Moog clone!).

Samuel B. Lupowitz

Musician. Songwriter. Food Enthusiast. Bad Pun Aficionado.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Buy the Moog D ios Ipad app. Plenty of sounds come with it, you can hear what each one sounds like before you go to the trouble of setting all the knobs.

 

Yep, and the knob settings are actually pretty close to where they'd be on a real Minimoog. Find a sound you like in the app, then recreate it on the real Mini. This will not only help you discover new sounds, but learn some less obvious tricks that the Mini is capable of. I have both the re-issued Model D and an iPad with the Model D app. Layering them together gives me kind of a "poor man's" Memorymoog on the polyphonic patches. :cool:

><>

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a keys player who loves that P-Funk sound but never touched a synth until I got a great deal on a Behringer Model D from the Garage Sale, I gotta say, with much respect, that it strikes me as odd that newbie synth players would need to pay dues and re-create from scratch those classic Moog sounds in order to learn the instrument. I get that I for sure need to spend the time working the knobs and experimenting, but for me, the priority is learning how to be expressive playing the riffs, using the modulation and pitch bend wheels, getting the musicality that I want out of the keys themselves. Maybe that's the wrong approach, but having a few quick charts to get me the sounds I need to start out would be very helpful in achieving that end! I'm like a guitar player who just wants to plug his Strat into a Fender Twin and match the knobs to his favorite player's tone so he can then go about the business of actually playing the guitar. That said, I completely agree that I've gotta understand and learn the mechanics - definitely going to take that advice to heart and dig in.

 

Well the flip side to all the "turn knobs and see what you get" advice--which is good advice!-- is that it does help to understand the basics of how a synth works. In the case of a subtractive synth, that would be oscillators, amplification (meaning volume not an amp!), envelopes, filters and LFOs. It's pretty easy to get into the weeds with even a basic synth like the minimoog with one knob twist, and then none of the others do squat to get you back out!

 

One of the major ways that subtractive synths differ from each other is in how those basic elements can interact (or with simpler ones, they may be limited in flexibility). Or how many of each they have--one, two or more oscillators, or how many LFOS etc.

 

There are some really good youtube tutorials on the subject. It sounds a bit overwhelming and some synths ARE overwhelming (to me at least) but like anything with practice it will come together :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...