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Chester Thompson "Squib Cakes" rehearsal solo transcription


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You, sir, are gentleman and a scholar. I was just telling the bass player from one of my bands how badly I wanted to try to learn this... time to put my money where my mouth is, I guess!

 

Also, since getting my clavinet set back up in our new studio space, I've been very grateful to have downloaded your exceptional Superstition transcription that you shared here some years back.

Samuel B. Lupowitz

Musician. Songwriter. Food Enthusiast. Bad Pun Aficionado.

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What a labor doing this! Thank you for sharing it.

 

I have a question about bass: Is the TOP bass guitar player doubling CT's pedals? There are times during his solo when CT breaks away from the basic groove pattern and seems to be freely moving around. What is the bass guitar doing at these times? I guess I'm also asking a general question I've always been curious about: How do you not have a fight over bass frequencies when you have bass pedals and bass guitar playing together?

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What a labor doing this! Thank you for sharing it.

How do you not have a fight over bass frequencies when you have bass pedals and bass guitar playing together?

 

Since Hammond bass pedals sound more like a fart than actual bass frequencies when you tap them, it doesn't conflict. Chester is tapping so fast and short that what you hear is mostly key click.

 

Check out his KC interview to hear him demonstrating this.

Moe

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Thanks Josh! And thanks also to forumite Dave E (Eskridge) for providing that CT-heavy "mix" of the tune as well. :2thu:

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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What a labor doing this! Thank you for sharing it.

 

I have a question about bass: Is the TOP bass guitar player doubling CT's pedals?

I'm pretty sure in this particular instance (the heavily improvised organ feature), the bass guitar is laying out. It's a full-on organ feature (plus drums).

 

Under more typical circumstances, defer to Mate Stubb above.

Samuel B. Lupowitz

Musician. Songwriter. Food Enthusiast. Bad Pun Aficionado.

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You, sir, are gentleman and a scholar. I was just telling the bass player from one of my bands how badly I wanted to try to learn this... time to put my money where my mouth is, I guess!

 

Cool. Good luck!

 

Coincidentally, last week I stumbled on this Open Studio practice video dealing with playing "outside" by moving a pentatonic pattern up in whole steps. It was a trick I knew, but I'd never thought of it in this particular way, and the video ended up being helpful. Then it turned out that what CT was doing here was simply a minor variant of this exact pattern. This is well worth checking out for an organized approach to practicing this concept.

 

[video:youtube]

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Thank you, Josh Paxton, for posting this. I found it helpful esp. for the "outside" parts- something I don't have enough of in my mostly vanilla musical vocabulary.

 

I find transcriptions helpful mostly because they save time. I have a good enough ear to pick out single note parts fairly quickly and accurately but it can still be time consuming. And I rarely have the patience to pick out voicings of dense chords. Also I am better at reading notation than accurately writing it.

 

Some seem to think that it's not worth it to get into the weeds of an accurate transcription, maybe because the original artists didn't overthink it in the 1st place, and may not play it the same way every time, live. But if a sound tickles my fancy I want to know how that sound is created. Over a decade ago I bought 2 of your transcription books, before you were posting here using your name. I found them to be very accurate and helpful- as much for the performance notes as the transcriptions themselves. Although I still haven't learned Crawfish Fiesta (and most of the others, lol- no excuses for that!)

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Another way of thinking about this is playing a lick and moving it up the whole tone scale. It"s the repetition of the phrase plus the natural 'out' feel you get by moving up the whole tone scale that gives this line the ear-crunching symmetry. Love it.
Endorsing Artist/Ambassador for MAG Organs and Motion Sound Amplifiers
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Another way of thinking about this is playing a lick and moving it up the whole tone scale. It"s the repetition of the phrase plus the natural 'out' feel you get by moving up the whole tone scale that gives this line the ear-crunching symmetry. Love it.

 

Another useful variation is to move it up a diminished scale instead of whole tone. The alteration between whole and half steps gives it a more unpredictable shape that can work out nicely.

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