Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Lay down a Hammond T-200 for moving?


rdnzl

Recommended Posts

I have someone offering to give me a perfectly fine, in working order Hammond T-200. I am wondering if I can lay it on its back to move it? I understand that the tonewheel generator on these is solid and does not need to be bolted down.

 

It has been played sparingly over the last 5 years, and they don't remember the last tine it was oiled.

 

Anyone?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 8
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Go ahead and move it on its back. It will be fine.

 

BTW Tony Banks played those back in the day.

 

As soon as you get it home, oil it and change the motor run cap.

Hammond: L111, M100, M3, BC, CV, Franken CV, A100, D152, C3, B3

Leslie: 710, 760, 51C, 147, 145, 122, 22H, 31H

Yamaha: CP4, DGX-620, DX7II-FD-E!, PF85, DX9

Roland: VR-09, RD-800

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had to look up what a T-200 was. Built in Leslie? Was it any good?

 

Not bad, but if the benchmark is a vintage Hammond console (A100/B3/C3), then an M3 or M100 spinet might be the next best thing. Although they are smaller, they both still have tonewheels, scanner vibrato, harmonic percussion, and tube circuitry. The M3 also has waterfall keys; the M100 and other spinets all have diving-board keys. "Green Onions" was recorded on the M3, and "Gimme Some Lovin'" and "A Whiter Shade of Pale" were recorded on the M100.

 

Next in line might be the L100 or its Porta-B portable version, which have tonewheels, harmonic percussion, and tube circuitry, but not scanner vibrato.

 

The T100 (no Leslie) or T200 (inbuilt Leslie) might be next on the list: it does have tonewheels and scanner vibrato but does not have tube circuitry or harmonic percussion, although it does have some percussion effects: "Marimba", "Xylophone", etc. The T200's inbuilt Leslie has a single 10" speaker with a drum rotor and is OK but not in the same league as a classic 2-rotor Leslie like the 122 (or shorter 142) usually used with vintage Hammond consoles or spinets, which has a separate 15" speaker with a drum rotor for bass, and a horn driver and rotor for treble. The tone and interaction of the tube amplifier, speakers, rotors, and cabinet of the classic 2-rotor Leslie (and the rapid speed-up/slow-down of the horn rotor) give it a distinctive sound.

 

Once upon a time, I had a Hammond B3 with a Leslie 122, and a Hammond M100 with a Leslie 142, and over the years, I have played various Hammond L, M, and T models. They all sound good, and better with a Leslie (or even a Ventilator through a good powered speaker.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had to look up what a T-200 was. Built in Leslie? Was it any good?

 

 

 

The T100 (no Leslie) or T200 (inbuilt Leslie) might be next on the list: it does have tonewheels and scanner vibrato but does not have tube circuitry or harmonic percussion, although it does have some percussion effects: "Marimba", "Xylophone", etc. The T200's inbuilt Leslie has a single 10" speaker with a drum rotor and is OK but not in the same league as a classic 2-rotor Leslie like the 122 (or shorter 142) usually used with vintage Hammond consoles or spinets, which has a separate 15" speaker with a drum rotor for bass, and a horn driver and rotor for treble. The tone and interaction of the tube amplifier, speakers, rotors, and cabinet of the classic 2-rotor Leslie (and the rapid speed-up/slow-down of the horn rotor) give it a distinctive sound.

 

 

However, harmonic percussion can be achieved using one of the percussion voices. I think its equivalent to 2nd harmonic. If all you want is to copy the B-3 sound then you probably wont be satisfied. If you want a different sound with additional percussion effects, beyond a B-3, then it can quite interesting. As a teenager, I played a T200 with an external Leslie in church. Some amazing sounds could be had by mixing one Leslie fast and the other slow. As a youth, I was more enthralled with the sound of the Hammond H-100, and to a lesser extent, the X-66, than I was the B-3.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...